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I am in the process of replacing the spindle bearings on my D110 mower deck. When I took them out, I noticed that the lower bearing (closest to the blade) was missing the seal on the inner surface of the bearing. Since they are supposed to be sealed bearings, they really shouldn't have to be greased. Is the missing seal and the zerk fitting to allow us to grease a normally "sealed" bearing? If so, then wouldn't the spindle have to have a significant amount of grease to keep it in contact with the bearing? That's a pretty big cavity to fill.

Seems to me to be a poor design. I've only got 34 hours on the tractor and the lower bearings are shot. The upper ones that are completely sealed are still in good shape.

Any advice as to whether I should remove the seal on the new bearings to match the removed ones?
 

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It depends on where the zerk and grease holes are in relation to the bearings. On my old 175 Hydro the grease came out the spindle between the two bearings. The original sealed bearings failed within the first season or so and when I replaced them I noticed they were sealed. So where was the grease going?

When I replaced the bearings I removed the two inner seals on the new bearings so they could accept grease. 20 years later and I was still running on the same set of spindle bearings.

Yes - it is critical that you put in enough grease to fill the spindle cavity. Once filled then it will only take a little bit of grease added to get pushed into the bearing.
 

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Lower bearings are not sealed on the top. Top bearing is sealed top and bottom. That's why there is a zerk fitting, so the lower bearing can recieve grease.

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Lower bearings are not sealed on the top. Top bearing is sealed top and bottom. That's why there is a zerk fitting, so the lower bearing can recieve grease.

Sent from my LGL52VL using Tapatalk
Wouldn't you want to remove the bottom seal on the top bearing? Otherwise the top bearing isn't going to get any grease.
 

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I have no idea why Deere did what they did.
At one time there was a zerk and both bearings were sealed. Fitting was for a one time greasing from the factory.. Makes sense eh!

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I am in the process of replacing the spindle bearings on my D110 mower deck. When I took them out, I noticed that the lower bearing (closest to the blade) was missing the seal on the inner surface of the bearing. Since they are supposed to be sealed bearings, they really shouldn't have to be greased. Is the missing seal and the zerk fitting to allow us to grease a normally "sealed" bearing? If so, then wouldn't the spindle have to have a significant amount of grease to keep it in contact with the bearing? That's a pretty big cavity to fill.

Seems to me to be a poor design. I've only got 34 hours on the tractor and the lower bearings are shot. The upper ones that are completely sealed are still in good shape.

Any advice as to whether I should remove the seal on the new bearings to match the removed ones?
Are you still in your warranty period with the tractor with that few hours?
 

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I am in the process of replacing the spindle bearings on my D110 mower deck. Seems to me to be a poor design. I've only got 34 hours on the tractor and the lower bearings are shot. The upper ones that are completely sealed are still in good shape.
Do you use the deck clean out port a lot that attaches to a garden hose?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It depends on where the zerk and grease holes are in relation to the bearings. On my old 175 Hydro the grease came out the spindle between the two bearings. The original sealed bearings failed within the first season or so and when I replaced them I noticed they were sealed. So where was the grease going?

When I replaced the bearings I removed the two inner seals on the new bearings so they could accept grease. 20 years later and I was still running on the same set of spindle bearings.

Yes - it is critical that you put in enough grease to fill the spindle cavity. Once filled then it will only take a little bit of grease added to get pushed into the bearing.
Since the bearings are so inexpensive ($14.99 for pack of ten), I decided to do an experiment. On the one side, I left all the seals installed. On the other side, I removed the inner seal from the bottom bearing. I greased them both. I didn't bother with removing the inner seals from the upper bearings since they were in good shape, and unless the grease was under pressure, gravity would prevent it from getting into those bearings anyway. If one starts making noise, I'll remove them and inspect for wear. Might take a while though. Thanks for the replies!
 

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I didn't bother with removing the inner seals from the upper bearings since they were in good shape, and unless the grease was under pressure, gravity would prevent it from getting into those bearings anyway. If one starts making noise, I'll remove them and inspect for wear. Might take a while though. Thanks for the replies!
Grease zerks work by pressurizing the grease and forcing it into places it wouldn't normally go. Grease never travels by gravity (unless excess globs are dropping on the garage floor). The whole idea of the grease fitting on the spindle housing is that as you pump in grease the housing eventually gets full at which point it starts to build pressure. As you continue to pump the pressurized grease forces its way into the bearings and they get lubricated.

That is why you see grease guns rated for 4,000 to 10,000 lbs of pressure as it sometimes takes that much force to squeeze the grease into the tight spaces.
 

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Since the bearings are so inexpensive ($14.99 for pack of ten), I decided to do an experiment. On the one side, I left all the seals installed. On the other side, I removed the inner seal from the bottom bearing. I greased them both. I didn't bother with removing the inner seals from the upper bearings since they were in good shape, and unless the grease was under pressure, gravity would prevent it from getting into those bearings anyway. If one starts making noise, I'll remove them and inspect for wear. Might take a while though. Thanks for the replies!
Interesting experiment, let us know how it works out!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Results os test

Interesting experiment, let us know how it works out!
I used the mower deck last year from June to October. I just disassembled the spindles and all the bearings are in good shape. Apparently the inner seals don't really change their operation. No corrosion evident in the bearing with the seal removed. I guess it's possible that the factory bearing that were installed in mine were defective. The aftermarket ones seem to be holding up well. I'll check again after this season.
 

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On my old 175 Hydro the spindle bearings went bad twice in a short period of time despite being greased regularly.

I noticed the bearings were all sealed which had me wondering how grease would ever get to them.

So on the third set of bearings I removed the inner seals on both the upper and lower bearings so that grease could get to them.

22 years later when I sold the tractor the bearings were still running smooth and quiet.

The grease inside the spindles is pressurized so it’s easy for grease to get to the upper and lower bearing.
 

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I grease my X310 spindles after every mow. 2 shots per spindle. Engine oil change once a month. Front steering/axle lube at oil change, couple of shots. Cheap insurance. Jd oil, jd filters and New Holland grease. Lol.

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I grease my X310 spindles after every mow. 2 shots per spindle. Engine oil change once a month. Front steering/axle lube at oil change, couple of shots. Cheap insurance. Jd oil, jd filters and New Holland grease. Lol.

Sent from my LGL52VL using Tapatalk
Wow... how many hours do you put on the machine each month?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Wow... how many hours do you put on the machine each month?
The part of my yard that I mow is just over one acre, so I put about 1.5-2 hours on it mowing once per week. In the spring I sometime have to mow twice in a week.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
I grease my X310 spindles after every mow. 2 shots per spindle. Engine oil change once a month. Front steering/axle lube at oil change, couple of shots. Cheap insurance. Jd oil, jd filters and New Holland grease. Lol.

Sent from my LGL52VL using Tapatalk
Monthly oil change! You must do a lot of mowing! I change mine once per season and it's usually pretty clean when I drain it. But like you said, cheap insurance. :) Of course, the mowing season in northern NY state is only about 5 months on a good year.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
On my old 175 Hydro the spindle bearings went bad twice in a short period of time despite being greased regularly.

I noticed the bearings were all sealed which had me wondering how grease would ever get to them.

So on the third set of bearings I removed the inner seals on both the upper and lower bearings so that grease could get to them.

22 years later when I sold the tractor the bearings were still running smooth and quiet.

The grease inside the spindles is pressurized so it’s easy for grease to get to the upper and lower bearing.
I put it back together as is. If there is no change at the end of the season, I'll leave it like that again for another year.
 

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The part of my yard that I mow is just over one acre, so I put about 1.5-2 hours on it mowing once per week. In the spring I sometime have to mow twice in a week.
I was asking xcopterdoc as he said he changes his oil once a month. :) I thought I was bad changing it every 25 hrs.
 
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