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I put down a good asphalt roof 16 yrs ago. Because of strong prevailing winds I've repaired parts of it each year for the last several years. The faces not facing into the wind have no damage other than the caps being beat up. I'm looking at putting down steel roofing to fight the wind damage. The brand I'm looking at is TERRABELLA. Specs include 52" by 14" with 2" overlap on end of shingle, 21 shingles per square, about 140 lbs per square, hidden fasteners about 100 1.5" screws per square, current Menard's sale price is $7 per shingle.

My questions are: Has anyone done this and how satisfied are you? Is it a do it yourself job. I've put down a lot of asphalt shingles over the years but just cannot carry 80 lb bundles up a ladder any more.

There are costs for specialty parts, drip edge, valleys, caps, etc. that I would have to figure in. I'm looking at good asphalt shingles at about $90+ per square with an expected life of maybe 20 yrs vs steel at $147 per square with an expected life of 40-50 years.

Opinions? Thanks

David
 

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Here in my area the steel roofing/material is not very expensive, i did metal roof over 2 -12x12 shed , garage 18x 20, barn 24x36 I did the work myself I like the metal roofing for -light strong and mainly for stain/alge resistance I do not like it for looks/noise Plan to do my home roof BUT i have to hire some one/ did not find a good and decent price For a home you need lots of trim/tools/planning for a pro look I would not advice to do it yourself My home roof is singles and 10 years late is full with stains :banghead::banghead:
 

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I did the metal roof two years ago for the same reason--wind. I am completely happy with it. I hired it done and I recommend you also hire it done. It was only slightly more expensive.

Sent from my Sprint HTC One
 

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I put down a good asphalt roof 16 yrs ago. Because of strong prevailing winds I've repaired parts of it each year for the last several years. The faces not facing into the wind have no damage other than the caps being beat up. I'm looking at putting down steel roofing to fight the wind damage. The brand I'm looking at is TERRABELLA. Specs include 52" by 14" with 2" overlap on end of shingle, 21 shingles per square, about 140 lbs per square, hidden fasteners about 100 1.5" screws per square, current Menard's sale price is $7 per shingle.

My questions are: Has anyone done this and how satisfied are you? Is it a do it yourself job. I've put down a lot of asphalt shingles over the years but just cannot carry 80 lb bundles up a ladder any more.

There are costs for specialty parts, drip edge, valleys, caps, etc. that I would have to figure in. I'm looking at good asphalt shingles at about $90+ per square with an expected life of maybe 20 yrs vs steel at $147 per square with an expected life of 40-50 years.

Opinions? Thanks

David
Not disputing your price ,but WOW $7.00 a sq. ,,to me that sounds low very low. I'd heard a few ago that type roof around here ,not installed was some where around $150.00 a sq.
Just checked Menards Web site for $6.95 one shingle covers. 4.76 of a sq. or $146. a sq.

http://www.menards.com/main/building-materials/roofing/steel-roofing/terrabella-reg-stone-coated-steel-roof-shingle-covers-4-76-sq-ft/p-1444423553859.htm

After reading on down your posting I see where you came up with the $147.

Yes Metal roofs last longer, most of the time easier , depending on the slope of roof and type roof , # of valleys .
Around here a lot of owners in the area are beginning to use just metal roofing to match the metal building or barn.
 

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I read it as $7.00 per shingle, Gene, not $7.00 per square.
Yes it says 7 per shingle,, and as I kept posting mine going back and forth checking Menards site.

Hey ,,,I'm OLD a Part Time Slacker....trying to get back on my feet.:laugh::flag_of_truce:

Please forgive, don't hit me with the wet noodles....no........Please..:munch::hide:
 

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I am becoming confused with the term "shingle" when talking about metal roofing. The only metal roofing I have seen (which I used on my pavilion) comes in sheets that are 36"-40" wide and a custom length.

I really wanted a metal roof when I had mine done 10 years ago but couldn't find a contractor that knew how to install it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
These are the same shape as asphalt shingles but are 50+ inches long. They are laid like regular shingles, parallel to the lower roof edge. Thanks for all your comments and advice. I will move on this project this week before the sale ends.
 

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I have metal roof on two sheds.
Unless someone shows me otherwise,,, I will stick to asphalt shingles on the house.

The few people that have added metal roof to the house have seen insurance cost skyrocket,,,

It seems there is an unusually high number of hail claims related to metal roofing,,, :dunno:
 

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I have metal roof on two sheds.
Unless someone shows me otherwise,,, I will stick to asphalt shingles on the house.

The few people that have added metal roof to the house have seen insurance cost skyrocket,,,

It seems there is an unusually high number of hail claims related to metal roofing,,, :dunno:

My roof is guessing 15 yrs old., been thinking I would go with metal roofing,, may have to check with insurance company , Thanks
 

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I put down a good asphalt roof 16 yrs ago. Because of strong prevailing winds I've repaired parts of it each year for the last several years. The faces not facing into the wind have no damage other than the caps being beat up. I'm looking at putting down steel roofing to fight the wind damage. The brand I'm looking at is TERRABELLA. Specs include 52" by 14" with 2" overlap on end of shingle, 21 shingles per square, about 140 lbs per square, hidden fasteners about 100 1.5" screws per square, current Menard's sale price is $7 per shingle.

My questions are: Has anyone done this and how satisfied are you? Is it a do it yourself job. I've put down a lot of asphalt shingles over the years but just cannot carry 80 lb bundles up a ladder any more.

There are costs for specialty parts, drip edge, valleys, caps, etc. that I would have to figure in. I'm looking at good asphalt shingles at about $90+ per square with an expected life of maybe 20 yrs vs steel at $147 per square with an expected life of 40-50 years.

Opinions? Thanks

David
Do you need to frame out for air space under the metal?

I have metal roof on two sheds.
Unless someone shows me otherwise,,, I will stick to asphalt shingles on the house.

The few people that have added metal roof to the house have seen insurance cost skyrocket,,,

It seems there is an unusually high number of hail claims related to metal roofing,,, :dunno:
Some say metal roofs can be a fire hazard also.

IMO, Metal roofs are ugly on a house. We redid our roof a few years ago with 50 year architectural shingles, I'll be dead before it leaks, hopefully.
 

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Do you need to frame out for air space under the metal?


Some say metal roofs can be a fire hazard also.

IMO, Metal roofs are ugly on a house. We redid our roof a few years ago with 50 year architectural shingles, I'll be dead before it leaks, hopefully.
The trend here is to switch to metal. We did also. I did some research about framing out the air space..... Some say yes and some say no. We did. 1x4" spacing under. Off the top I think they are called perlins. They allow the air to circulate as stated. We have full length metal sheeting that has !" full length risers to allow the air to circulate anyway. The perlins are just an added measure I would guess. Seems all the roof here have the spacers added also. On the TV show Building Araska, they don't and attach the metal straight over the Ice shield. Six of one and Half a dozen of the other. Heat may or may not build up during a fire if at all. Asphalt shingles are petroleum based and should insulate the heat also. May take a little longer to repair a burnt roof either way. Fire is always a bad issue. Smoke damage, Fire damage and Water damage from suppression. My insurance stayed the same and I my new roof qualified for an IRS tax deduction for energy efficiency. My old roof didn't leak but, it was at it's end of it's expected life cycle. No more Snow build up. Just have to watch where it sheds too. like over an Doorway or AC unit. My next home WILL have a metal roof. Can't be beat. Architectural metal roofs should be of the same qualities of full length sheeting I would guess. Go for it. Do some Googling.
 

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My installer also used 1x4 spacers under the metal.

Sent from my Sprint HTC One
 

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We have steel roofs on 3 of our buildings. The Pole Barn, 2 car garage and car port for the 5th wheel camper. The 1.5 car garage and house have asphalt shingles. The shingles on the garage are pretty bad so I am looking at switching that over to steel. I would like to try and get to that this summer but we will see. When I do that I think I might also build a lean-to off the south end of that building. It would be nice to get some protection for some stuff that doesn't really need to be inside so it sits outside now like the box grader. This roof is pretty straight forward and not that big so I will do it myself. Before too long we will be doing the same thing with the house and for that I think I will hire it out if we go steel. If we go asphalt again we will do it ourselves. Don't know yet. The reasoning is because I don't want to mess with the valley and vents that are in the house but not the garage. So should it be done professionally or DIY, I think a big part of that will depend on how complex the roof is.

That said, I have never seen those steel shingles mentioned by the OP. Maybe working with them would be more like a traditional install so it wouldn't be too bad. Do they provide better protection from wind as you mentioned? I ask because I am used to the steel roof panels that mount from the peak to the eve and lock together or overlap so once done it basically becomes one big sheet of steel.
 

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I have metal roof on two sheds.
Unless someone shows me otherwise,,, I will stick to asphalt shingles on the house.

The few people that have added metal roof to the house have seen insurance cost skyrocket,,,

It seems there is an unusually high number of hail claims related to metal roofing,,, :dunno:
Our insurance went DOWN after the metal roof. Due to safer from catching fire if embers were to land on it. Ours was NOT installed raised or with an air space, so hail should not be an issue.

Do you need to frame out for air space under the metal?


Some say metal roofs can be a fire hazard also.

IMO, Metal roofs are ugly on a house. We redid our roof a few years ago with 50 year architectural shingles, I'll be dead before it leaks, hopefully.
We went metal almost five years ago. Hidden fasteners, standing rib. No framing for air space.Contractor did a complete tear off of the old shingles then "ice dam" over the entire roof. He said it seals around every screw that pierces it. Venting was done at the ridge. The only thing I felt was ugly were the "snow jacks" little triangle things, to hold the snow. When a friend had his roof done they have changed to a bar the connects to the rib and runs parallel to the eave edge, instead of snow jacks.

I like the sound of rain on the roof. I have enough insulation it does not sound like you are in a metal drum.
 

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I like the sound of rain on the roof. I have enough insulation it does not sound like you are in a metal drum.
When my wife was growing up she lived in a house with a metal roof and was telling me one day how they had a walnut tree that was near the house. The squirrels or gravity would take over in the fall and the walnuts would fall from the tree and make a loud bang scaring the crap out of her. While we have a couple walnut trees in our yard they are not near the house so no problems there.
 

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We have steel roofs on 3 of our buildings. The Pole Barn, 2 car garage and car port for the 5th wheel camper. The 1.5 car garage and house have asphalt shingles. The shingles on the garage are pretty bad so I am looking at switching that over to steel. I would like to try and get to that this summer but we will see. When I do that I think I might also build a lean-to off the south end of that building. It would be nice to get some protection for some stuff that doesn't really need to be inside so it sits outside now like the box grader. This roof is pretty straight forward and not that big so I will do it myself. Before too long we will be doing the same thing with the house and for that I think I will hire it out if we go steel. If we go asphalt again we will do it ourselves. Don't know yet. The reasoning is because I don't want to mess with the valley and vents that are in the house but not the garage. So should it be done professionally or DIY, I think a big part of that will depend on how complex the roof is.

That said, I have never seen those steel shingles mentioned by the OP. Maybe working with them would be more like a traditional install so it wouldn't be too bad. Do they provide better protection from wind as you mentioned? I ask because I am used to the steel roof panels that mount from the peak to the eve and lock together or overlap so once done it basically becomes one big sheet of steel.
I would do it myself now that I know how to do it. When dealing with Valley's that is problematic in my opinion. Best leave that to the professionals. I have seen them folded back like a sarden can lid when heavy shedding snow lifts the other side as it makes it way off the roof. As my roof has no valleys, I would defiantly let someone with more experience in that department handle it.
 

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Our insurance went DOWN after the metal roof. Due to safer from catching fire if embers were to land on it. Ours was NOT installed raised or with an air space, so hail should not be an issue.



We went metal almost five years ago. Hidden fasteners, standing rib. No framing for air space.Contractor did a complete tear off of the old shingles then "ice dam" over the entire roof. He said it seals around every screw that pierces it. Venting was done at the ridge. The only thing I felt was ugly were the "snow jacks" little triangle things, to hold the snow. When a friend had his roof done they have changed to a bar the connects to the rib and runs parallel to the eave edge, instead of snow jacks.

I like the sound of rain on the roof. I have enough insulation it does not sound like you are in a metal drum.
My BIL put a metal roof on his house with a 4/12 pitch roof and he installed the rib that runs parallel to eve. This summer he added a garage to his house and put a 6/12 pitch roof and no rib or triangle to slow the snow sliding off the roof. His step daughter came a couple days after our big 32" snow. Parked infront of the garage doors. I was blowing some snow and heard a load noise inside the Original cab, blower running and tractor noise. OH what was that,, happened to look over at his driveway ,,OH NO all , his driveway was full of snow ,plus the step daughters hood and windshield. Thankfully it didn't break her windshield, if you look at certain angles you can see the damage to the hood.. About 2 weeks later he installed the rib piece on the roof.

We have the triangle hangers on the church roof and really I like the looks of them compared to his. Either one works. :dunno:
 
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