Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
527 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Been looking at getting a decent new dual axle trailer. I’m set on an 18ft with dovetail. They offer a wooden deck and a steel deck. The steel is about $250 more. My first instinct is go with steel however I recently loaded a buddies steel decked trailer with his implements and they slid everywhere. It was extremely slick. We set his rear blade down and the trailer was not on level ground and it almost slid off the other side. It was easy to maneuver things to tie down but I have had a small utility trailer with a wooden deck for over 10 years and it’s still in great shape and has a lot more traction. What do you guys use and what’s your opinion?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,764 Posts
me--i would go for wood deck:thumbup1gif:u should be able to get at least a good 20 yrs out of the lumber if its taken care off-IMO.

my trailer sits out all yr long, and it still looks good for being 17yrs old this summer. the paint faded more than the lumber on the deck did. if i could of stored it out of the weather-i bet it would of lasted 30 yrs:dunno:

i never oiled it or added anything to it over the yrs. they must of used grade A for that floor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,143 Posts
An idea if you wanted to go with a steel deck, you could add horse mats before you load your tractor or equipment. This would help them from sliding around so much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
I had a tilt bed trailer with steel deck for a skidsteer in the rain or snow completely unusable. The balancing act to load equipment was terrible. But I would never again own a steel deck that wasn’t a dump trailer
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,757 Posts
I recommend wood deck. Steel deck is good for stake body trucks or dump trailers that you want stuff to slide out of.

That’s just my $.02.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Agreed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,315 Posts
I have owned a tilt deck steel bed car/open trailer and currently own a wood deck utility trailer. The wood in my utility trailer rotted out in three years so I am on my second set of boards as of last summer. Not sure if it was just cheap wood from the manufacturer or because I have to keep my trailer outside as to why it rotted so fast. Years ago I also had a car trailer with a wood deck and a dove tail. The frame of it cracked at the dove tail joint the first time I tried to load my Chevelle onto the trailer. The trailer was rated at 7500lbs so it should have held a 3800 Chevelle without issue. I think it was a poor welding job but I was not too enamored with the wood deck surrounded by a metal frame either. I bought that car trailer new because it was a good price but I guess when you don't care about your welding, you can sell it cheap!

I prefer the steel deck I owned but mine was diamond plate. I owned that trailer years before I started with this tractor hobby/disease so I can't comment on slipperiness when loading a tractor. I never had a car or any other load slip when I didn't want it too. I have also never loaded anything on a cross slope either. That's too much risk for me.

I prefer a steel deck because of the longevity of the deck (I don't live in area that gets a lot of road salt) and the robustness of it but I am usually hauling car with my trailers. The steel deck trailers are a bit heavier so that should be taken into consideration when determining if your tow vehicle can tow it. I do like the feedback of the other people on their experiences of a steel deck trailer when loading a tractor. That does give me a little pause as I am in the initial stages of getting another open deck trailer myself because I want the ability to haul my 3E series tractor.

I think either style works just fine, so it's preference and depends on how you use the trailer and the conditions you use it in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
As with many of the opinions, I would go with the wood deck. It will rot out at some point but sealing it will make it last a long time. I sealed my wood trailer deck within a couple weeks of buying it and it looks pretty good after 5 years of abuse. My father has a steel fifth wheel trailer we use on the farm and its tough at nails but gets really slick with any sort of moisture. Now we pretty much use it only for hauling fertilizer tanks that are strapped down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
527 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the reply’s. I think the wood deck will suit me well. My utility trailer is wood and has lasted over 10 years now. Plus the wood is less expensive. Plus if it ever does need replaced I can do that myself. If the metal deck rusts out I’m at the mercy of a shop and probably big $$ to fix. I will probably have a shop reinforce the fenders so that we can haul round bales of hay on it occasionally and not worry about smashing them.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
I'm building a 6x14 tilt bed as we speak, and it will get a PT wood deck. I have owned both, much prefer wood. Not slippery, you can screw pieces to it if you are moving unusual objects that need support. If I had a better source I would go with rough cut 2" oak if you are going to abuse the crap out of it. The PT will be a bit slippery until it weathers a season or 2, but much better than steel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,758 Posts
I've seen a number of the commercial builders offer trailers with wood decks. The problem with what they offer is the wood is not pressure treated (PT). I built a multi-purpose trailer 27 years ago for hauling motorcycles (it has three wheel troughs that run the length of it), the then garden tractor, and general purpose. I utilized 2x8 and 2x10 treated lumber as decking between the wheel troughs. I took some extra time fitting it, utilizing a plane to trim it for a tight fit. As I knew when it dried, it was going to shrink. Treated lumber has an extremely high moisture content when new.

Well, its been 27 years and the trailer is always stored outdoors. I've replaced the leaf springs once, the fenders have rusted through and there are some other rust areas that need some attention. However, the wood decking is still in great shape.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
735 Posts
I have a tilt deck trailer with a steel deck. I like like it as I don't have to worry about damaging it or it wearing out, also I can weld or bolt tiedowns where ever I want. My 2720 tractor does fine climbing the incline but I do occasionally have issues with the zero turn spinning out if its a really hot day or wet out. But only when the deck is tilted up, zero issues when the deck in down. The deck is a diamond pattern so does offer some traction. I wouldn't ever go with a smooth steel deck. I had a wood tilt deck tilt trailer before this one and had the same problem with the zero turn when it was wet as well.

I have seen a sand like product at the hardware store that you can add to paint to give a surface more grip. If I ever get around to painting the deck I'll use some of that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
837 Posts
I just had a new all aluminum trailer built this past Fall. It has a wood floor that I painted with an industrial floor paint that I got at Sherwin Williams. They put in something called Shark grip that gives you plenty of traction. I did the same with my last trailer and it lasted over 10 years. They both are enclosed but are used daily.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,983 Posts
Kiln dried after treatment

I've seen a number of the commercial builders offer trailers with wood decks. The problem with what they offer is the wood is not pressure treated (PT). I built a multi-purpose trailer 27 years ago for hauling motorcycles (it has three wheel troughs that run the length of it), the then garden tractor, and general purpose. I utilized 2x8 and 2x10 treated lumber as decking between the wheel troughs. I took some extra time fitting it, utilizing a plane to trim it for a tight fit. As I knew when it dried, it was going to shrink. Treated lumber has an extremely high moisture content when new.

Well, its been 27 years and the trailer is always stored outdoors. I've replaced the leaf springs once, the fenders have rusted through and there are some other rust areas that need some attention. However, the wood decking is still in great shape.
It is possible to purchase kiln dried after treatment (KDAT) lumber but not all supply houses stock it. For decks and other outdoor construction, it may not be worth the cost but for something that requires close fitting joints it could be. One caveat is that if you get KDAT lumber and then leave it outside, you can get buckling of a deck as the wood expands due to ambient air moisture. For most of us, buying treated lumber and storing it for a month or so takes most of the excess surface moisture out.

Treated wood also has different ratings. Wood that is certified for ground contact is more thoroughly treated. If you cut the end of a board you can usually see the difference in how far the treatment has penetrated into the wood.

Use all the wood you want, we'll grow more- LOL.

Treefarmer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Hi All
I not only transport my 1025R on my trailer but also 100 + year old OIL ENGINES which weigh between 1.75 Tonnes and 2.25 Tonnes, they are on steel wheels. The wheels tend to distort steel decking and slip around, and go through wooden decks due to there point loading. So what I have done is use flat steel for the deck and then put strips of formply where the wheels go. The formply spreads the load over the steel stop it distorting and stops the steel wheels sliding around, the steel stops the the wheels going through the formply. It works very well.:good2:
regards John
PS below is a picture of my rig ready to go to a rally I also have a trailer so I can take 2 engines to local rally's, the tray of the truck is built the same as the trailer.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
527 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Well today was the day! After looking at trailers for months I decided to pull the trigger today. 18ft wood deck with 5 inch frame. Got great deal on it and couldn’t be happier. Was raining when I went by the trailer dealer and the metal just seemed too slick. This will haul my 2025R and any attachments I want just fine. Thanks for everyone’s input.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top