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If this thread doesn't fit here, please remove.

I have come upon a 4310 John Deere at a reasonable price, BUT I do not know enough about them to "pull the trigger". My only question is will it be suitable for our farm, safety-wise. Our farm is a hillside farm with steep slopes. Currently, I will not bushhog these slopes with what I have ('46 Ford-Ferguson and a MF 150) and have it contracted out.

Will the ePower Reverse transmission "hold" on the slopes traveling up and down or, saying it another way, top to bottom and back? Asking it another way, does it have "hold back" in the transmission? Will I use it to bushhog those slopes? Probably not, but I need something to get to the ridge top fields to work. There are roads transversing the slopes to the tops.

Is this tractor a "safe" choice?
 

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It should have no issues. If it starts freewheeling, you always have the brakes, and a very big internal problem with the trans.


the epowerReverser is in many tractors today, including the 4,5, and 6E tractors, and maybe even 3 series at this point. Deere had the EPR trans in the 4010 through 4410, and a fully hydraulic version in the 45-4710, as well as the 3x20 and 4x20. When they changed everything up, they went back to the EPR system

TL;DR, you should be fine.
 

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I have a 4310 that I do some periodic mowing on steep slopes and to answer your question. Yes it will as long as you are in B or A range the tractor should have no issue. The key point to always keep in mind though is if you have to brake don't depress the clutch or flip the selector on the steering column in neutral until you have the brake fully depressed. In low B or A range you can stand on that brake and the tractor will still go forward without stalling but if you do it the other way around it will instantly go into freewheeling then when you hit the brakes the tires have tendency to want to slide or skid.

The other thing to keep in mind is that the stance of the tractor isn't very wide. It's industry standard but when compared to even your '46 it will have a narrow stance so if you have to cover any of that hillside at an angle it is going to feel unstable or top heavy. But this can be alleviated with wheel spacers.

Overall I have been very happy with my 4310. It has done everything I asked of it and then some. If I had one complaint it would be an over-engineered safety interlock for the drive system. It likes everything done in a particular order to get it moving. Forget to do one step and the little blinking orange light will come on. Hit a hard bump and momentarily bounce off the seat the tractor will stop moving. Once you get some seat time in operating it becomes second nature but for people unfamiliar with the tractor it can be a bit frustrating.
 
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