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Discussion Starter #1
We're installing a meter base and electric to our dock. The cost of the building permit was shocking, $485. I was expecting $50-$75. This amount seems excessive? It took the county 37 days to approve it. Funny thing is, we received a letter from the tax office yesterday saying our taxes went up by the amount I estimated the cost of the job to be. Un real!
 

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Wasn't too long ago the meter base and meter were free around here. Not anymore.
The power company dropped off the meter base for free. But the cost of the permit is outrageous...
 

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And they wonder why people don't pull permits.:banghead:
 

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We're installing a meter base and electric to our dock. The cost of the building permit was shocking, $485. I was expecting $50-$75. This amount seems excessive? It took the county 37 days to approve it. Funny thing is, we received a letter from the tax office yesterday saying our taxes went up by the amount I estimated the cost of the job to be. Un real!
That's crazy. It cost me $125 for building permit for my shop and only should have been a $100 but that's a different story. The wife showed the county the building plans and an hour later we had a permit. It's just another way for the county to suck money out of you. :banghead:
 

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That's crazy. It cost me $125 for building permit for my shop and only should have been a $100 but that's a different story. The wife showed the county the building plans and an hour later we had a permit. It's just another way for the county to suck money out of you. :banghead:
I still can't figure out 1) why it cost so much and 2) why it took so long. There is a $95 fee for the Chesapeake Bay Act, but it's robbery what they charge.

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Thats nothing.....out here in Idaho we have to pay a separate electrical permit fee ($400) on top of the building permit ($1500 for a 3500sq ft non commercial workshop - ouch), and pay for the meter base and what ever conduit and wire to run from the transformer to the meter. But at least our electricity is cheap at 6 cents/kwh. Its one of the few things that are not reasonable in Idaho.
 

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Our township is heavily zoned. The "lake" people really want to control each other. So our permits are high too, I am guessing to pay for all the zoning enforcement people. :dunno:
 

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I still can't figure out 1) why it cost so much and 2) why it took so long. There is a $95 fee for the Chesapeake Bay Act, but it's robbery what they charge.

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Its called government!! And some people actually think we need more government!!:banghead:
 

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Permit fees are up around here too. We have a Agricultural Permit for Farms and if the building is related to Farming use it is a $25.00 fee and a mark on your property layout as to where it is going to be located. Long as it stays 100 feet from the well and 10 ft from the property lines you can build pretty much what you want and it is not inspected. I built a 48 x 60 barn with power, a 24 x 30 shop, a 30 x 48 small barn and many small buildings like this steel building with out one. This steel building was fun. I bought a bunch of 20 ft long 2x2 x 3/16" wall box steel plus a bunch of 20ft 3" angle iron 3/16" thick for $200.00 at a auction. I made a rim foundation out of the angle iron and set it on treated wood and put a treated wood floor bolted down on top of the steel. I put up a frame of 2x2 box steel on 4 ft centers and built the roof support out of the same. So the whole building was framed in 3/16" steel and bolted together. Drilled all the steel and welded up all the angles in my shop by building it in my mind did not use a set of plans. It was all bolted together square then I put 2x6's bolted to the steel to screw the steel to. This was my last 10 ft x 20 ft building I built but will last a few life times. You can see the ends of the 2x2 steel working for the rafters and even the little door over hang is supported by steel. One big kids erector set to put together. 100_0457.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Almost done.

Boxes are mounted 195' of trench dug and wire ran. Passed inspection today, so tomorrow I can backfill the trench. We're just waiting on the Power Company to hook it up now. They're backed up from the wind storm , so we don't have a clue when that'll be.
 

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Boxes are mounted 195' of trench dug and wire ran. Passed inspection today, so tomorrow I can backfill the trench. We're just waiting on the Power Company to hook it up now. They're backed up from the wind storm , so we don't have a clue when that'll be.
Around here the codes pretty much state that the cost of providing the inspections should dictate the cost of the permit. If the inspector was there one time the jurisdiction by law cannot charge much more than the cost to provide that one inspection. This has been challenged in court and won by people like yourself. Makes a guy want to ask some questions to someone like a building official?:dunno:
 

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My permit fees are.. wait for it.. zero and no inspections. No permits for buildings in the county (ranch land around here) but you do need permits for septic and water well.

No permits means if you hire a contractor, you better make sure you are really familiar with code -or- you know and trust your builder. We are having 1100 sq ft added to our little house and in the contract I specified all work must meet national code. Our little house was not built to code but that will be remediated as part of the addition project.

The people that had this house built were idiots.
 

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My permit fees are.. wait for it.. zero and no inspections. No permits for buildings in the county (ranch land around here) but you do need permits for septic and water well.

No permits means if you hire a contractor, you better make sure you are really familiar with code -or- you know and trust your builder. We are having 1100 sq ft added to our little house and in the contract I specified all work must meet national code. Our little house was not built to code but that will be remediated as part of the addition project.

The people that had this house built were idiots.
Who verifies that it does?:dunno: Do banks lend money on possibly dangerous or sub standard dwellings that had no professional inspections. Would insurance pay up on a house that burned down due to faulty construction. :dunno:
 

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Who verifies that it does?:dunno: Do banks lend money on possibly dangerous or sub standard dwellings that had no professional inspections. Would insurance pay up on a house that burned down due to faulty construction. :dunno:
That wouldn't fly here either. I've seen buildings erased because the owner tried to circumvent the permit process. It should not be revenue generating and $400 certainly appears to be just that. I can get most things done for a case of Bud Light and the county where I live charges nothing for a permit so long as you or your contractor pulls it prior to construction. No local bank would turn over a dime without a permit and segmented inspections of the construction or remodel. Anybody see the pedestrian bridge in Florida that collapsed? That should have had segmented inspections from a structural engineer/s. $h!t like that just isn't supposed to happen.
 

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Who verifies that it does?:dunno: Do banks lend money on possibly dangerous or sub standard dwellings that had no professional inspections. Would insurance pay up on a house that burned down due to faulty construction. :dunno:
I could hire an inspector but I'm very familiar with typical house wiring, done my own for 35 years. Framing - pretty simple. My concrete slab that was just poured is first-class however I did have to raise a stink when the crew was puncturing the plastic sheeting with rebar stakes in the beams instead of using the wire 'hats' to hold up the rebar. I made them pull the rebar up and cover the holes with special tape.

The electrician and plumber have master certifications and my contractor is first class. (I also downloaded the state of Texas building construction standards and verifying we are good to go during construction.)

Our house is Hardi plank and I didn't discover there was NO sheathing on the outside of the studs until I drilled a hole in the wall. These idiots didn't even put sheathing in the corners of the walls, Hardi plank has zero structural properties. The kitchen island had no electrical outlets which is not compliant with national electric code - I remedied that with a diamond saw blade and chisel. Made a trench in the slab for power and put some floor covering in the kitchen work area. There's really nothing inherently dangerous with our little house but I'm a stickler to do things properly and correctly so we're spending quite a few bucks to make the existing house 'right.'

We paid cash when we bought our small ranch and the addition/remodeling is also a cash deal. We are very blessed to be debt free and have the financial resources to negate the need to borrow money.
 

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I could hire an inspector but I'm very familiar with typical house wiring, done my own for 35 years. Framing - pretty simple. My concrete slab that was just poured is first-class however I did have to raise a stink when the crew was puncturing the plastic sheeting with rebar stakes in the beams instead of using the wire 'hats' to hold up the rebar. I made them pull the rebar up and cover the holes with special tape.

The electrician and plumber have master certifications and my contractor is first class. (I also downloaded the state of Texas building construction standards and verifying we are good to go during construction.)

Our house is Hardi plank and I didn't discover there was NO sheathing on the outside of the studs until I drilled a hole in the wall. These idiots didn't even put sheathing in the corners of the walls, Hardi plank has zero structural properties. The kitchen island had no electrical outlets which is not compliant with national electric code - I remedied that with a diamond saw blade and chisel. Made a trench in the slab for power and put some floor covering in the kitchen work area. There's really nothing inherently dangerous with our little house but I'm a stickler to do things properly and correctly so we're spending quite a few bucks to make the existing house 'right.'

We paid cash when we bought our small ranch and the addition/remodeling is also a cash deal. We are very blessed to be debt free and have the financial resources to negate the need to borrow money.
If that house was standing where my house is, with the 60mph sustained winds we get, think little red riding hood. No way it would survive. It sounds like the person or persons who put that together need to stick to birdhouses.
 

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If that house was standing where my house is, with the 60mph sustained winds we get, think little red riding hood. No way it would survive. It sounds like the person or persons who put that together need to stick to birdhouses.
We routinely get sustained winds of 30 and gusts to 40+ but the house was sited in the middle of a grove of live oaks which break up the wind. Also, severe weather is extremely rare in this part of Texas, good thing too since the construction quality of the house is crap. We've had ice on the inside of our north facing windows due to sweating and freezing - all that will be fixed. :munch:
 
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