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I have a new Stihl 250 (2days old). Been thinning the brush with my new 1025r. Taking down small trees and cutting them up etc. My chain oiler seems to be clogged. Took off the plate and did a quick cleaning but still doesn't work. I doubt it's the pump. Does anyone know of a quick fix, shop vac, compressor blow out etc. I just moved here and am literally working off the floor. My shop is apart and my tools in boxes on the floor. Would appreciate any help. Why would it clog this early ?

Tax,
Don
 

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Did you remove the chain and bar to see if it's blocked with sawdust?
 

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Agreed!!! Remove the chain and bar and make sure the oiling ports are open. Most likely blocked up.
 
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Thanks Gizmo and Ray.

I took off the cover and cleaned the inside of it. Every nook and cranny. I next took off chain and bar. I took a fine stainless brush and brushed the bar and cleaned out the bar ports. Next I cleaned out the side of the saw under the cover, dental picks, brushes with a shop vac going. Started it up and had oil ooze from the saw port. Put it back together, tightened and sharpened chain and it worked. When I revved it up and pointed the bar close to the concrete I got a line of oil. Thanks again guys. Ready to play lumber jack in the morning!
 

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Also be sure to hold the bar up when you tighten the nuts. This gives the best alignment to the oil hole. The bar has play in it when mounted slightly loose, adjust chain then pull up then tighten.
 

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Great news that you fixed your Stihl saw. You said it is only 2 days old, I'm wondering why you didn't take it back to the dealer? :dunno:

I just wanted to tell you the story with the last new Stihl chainsaw I bought a few years ago. Maybe NOT bringing it back to the dealer was a better choice.

Brand new MS201T, started fine, ran fine, oiled fine (or I thought so). Brought it up to my stepdaughter's to cut a few branches and less than halfway through its first tank the oiler stopped, oil tank was at least 3/4 full, chain just began to start smoking so I stopped. Brought the saw back to the dealer, who "tested" the saw's oiler. I heard them revving my saw in the back and they said it was oiling fine, even showed me the oil streak on the cardboard. I immediately said "can't be right", but I said I'd take it and try it out. As I picked it up, I noticed a small puddle of oil under the saw, so I thought whatever was the problem, their revving it might have cleared it.

Brought it home, tested it, it flung a little oil, but I didn't think it was enough. It started smoking on the first cut. I took it apart, removed the brake/sprocket and found a split oil line from the tank to the oil pump. It was sucking air, but let enough oil pass for the "oil on the cardboard" test. Took the saw back to the dealer and I took it apart on their counter. They sheepishly apologized and gave me a new oil line ... I told them I'd put it in myself, that way I know it will be installed correctly :nunu: (Note that the oil spot under the saw when I picked it up was not excess oil from the bar, it was dripping from the split hose)

Just in case you still have a problem, you may take a look at the oil line. It can be bad from the factory. And some dealers may not be all that smart.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks Tom

I didn't take it back to the dealer because I didn't want to lose 1/2 a day or more. When I finish, I usually clean and check the tractor, top it off with fuel, clean, fuel and oil all my tools so I can fire up in the morning and start at sunrise. With the time I spent on the road and waiting for them to fix it, I figured I would tinker with it. Still a bit disappointed that it clogged after one day of heavy use. I learned the hard way that it is not as rugged as I thought. I will keep a brush around and brush it clean thru out the day and be carefully where I place it on the ground when switching tasks.
 

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I didn't take it back to the dealer because I didn't want to lose 1/2 a day or more. When I finish, I usually clean and check the tractor, top it off with fuel, clean, fuel and oil all my tools so I can fire up in the morning and start at sunrise. With the time I spent on the road and waiting for them to fix it, I figured I would tinker with it. Still a bit disappointed that it clogged after one day of heavy use. I learned the hard way that it is not as rugged as I thought. I will keep a brush around and brush it clean thru out the day and be carefully where I place it on the ground when switching tasks.
This could be a one time deal. What were you cutting?

I've had a few Stihl saws with MANY hours behind them, sure they clog on occasion but I would think all saws do. I could almost say, forget about it, you'll never see it again.
 

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I took off the cover and cleaned the inside of it. Every nook and cranny. I next took off chain and bar. I took a fine stainless brush and brushed the bar and cleaned out the bar ports. Next I cleaned out the side of the saw under the cover, dental picks, brushes with a shop vac going. Started it up and had oil ooze from the saw port. Put it back together, tightened and sharpened chain and it worked. When I revved it up and pointed the bar close to the concrete I got a line of oil. Thanks again guys. Ready to play lumber jack in the morning!
FM- It sounds to me that you took the steps that we do to remediate oiler problems. When it becomes colder and the oil viscosifies, another trick is to add a bit of pre-mix into the bar oil tank to thin it to restore oiling.

Welcome back to saw land...

Brian
 

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Normal issue

I didn't take it back to the dealer because I didn't want to lose 1/2 a day or more. When I finish, I usually clean and check the tractor, top it off with fuel, clean, fuel and oil all my tools so I can fire up in the morning and start at sunrise. With the time I spent on the road and waiting for them to fix it, I figured I would tinker with it. Still a bit disappointed that it clogged after one day of heavy use. I learned the hard way that it is not as rugged as I thought. I will keep a brush around and brush it clean thru out the day and be carefully where I place it on the ground when switching tasks.
That's really not an issue with any particular saw. I have both a Husqvarna and Stihl saws. Depending on what I'm cutting, either or both will clog. So did the older McCulloughs we used to run. I don't carry any special tools in the woods, just the scrench to take the bar off and a pocket knife to clean it up. Usually running a small knife blade down the bar groove and cleaning up the port in the bar is all it takes.

If you see really fine sawdust coming off the cut, watch for a plugged bar. If you are getting nice chips, it's usually not a problem. Fine dust means either the chain is dull or it's just the characteristic of the wood you are cutting. Dry red cedar is our most frequent issue- even with a sharp chain you get some dust. Dry cherry is another one that will plug things up but green cherry is not an issue.

Treefarmer
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Chain saw

I was cutting mostly pine, some oak. Also, it's harder to start then when it was out of the box.
 

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I was cutting mostly pine, some oak. Also, it's harder to start then when it was out of the box.
I have a fair number of Stihls and they all start the same way...
Choke - pull until it tries to start (usually 2 pulls)
Take the choke off - usually starts on the first pull, sometimes the second.
 

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I've run into the same issue with my MS250 and have gotten the bar pretty warm on occasion when I don't notice it soon enough. I cut a lot of dead pine which makes dust no matter how sharp the saw is.

I have had it checked out by 2 different dealers and both said when it's clean it runs fine, and I tend to agree. I've learned to pay more attention to it and keep it clean.

I am disappointed on how relatively easily it clogs and that the flow is not adjustable though, but for a fairly low level homeowner saw its no big surprise.
 

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I didn't take it back to the dealer because I didn't want to lose 1/2 a day or more. When I finish, I usually clean and check the tractor, top it off with fuel, clean, fuel and oil all my tools so I can fire up in the morning and start at sunrise. With the time I spent on the road and waiting for them to fix it, I figured I would tinker with it. Still a bit disappointed that it clogged after one day of heavy use. I learned the hard way that it is not as rugged as I thought. I will keep a brush around and brush it clean thru out the day and be carefully where I place it on the ground when switching tasks.
Most chain saw oilers work on the same principle. A small gear driven pump behind the clutch. Some of the home line saws use a plastic gear on the oiler pump which at times wears out. Most oiling problems are usually just the ports are blocked. The higher end saws usually have a metal gear pump. Of course, those saws cost three two to three times as much also.
 

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I was cutting mostly pine, some oak. Also, it's harder to start then when it was out of the box.
I'd go right after the air cleaner first thing for a hard starter. Some conditions will clog one fairly quick. I like a couple clean spares in the "possibles bucket" along with a spare/gapped plug, spare chain(s), file/guide, bar tool, etc...
 

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I have a MS180 with the easy start & tool less chain adjuster. Mainly got it for the light weight & easy start. With my bad back it's almost impossible for me to pull start a regular chain saw. After a bunch of shopping I decided on the 180. My big mistake was not trying to start it myself before leaving with my purchase. When I got it home I realized I got the same model without the easy start. Then I finally realized why it was $25 cheaper than I thought. The next day back it went like a boomerang. My local JD dealer was good about taking it back even after it was fueled and run.

Never had any oiling issues with my saw. The pull start rope broke 2 times but it was covered under warranty. The only other problem I had was getting the bar & chain stuck in a tree.

My old saw was a Pulan Wild thing with an 18" bar. That saw was nothing but trouble. It took 2 peeps just to start it. The chain oiler never worked on it. I ended up using motorcycle chain lube on the bar the last time I had to use it.
 

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When I purchased my ms250 the dealer filled it up with gas and oil took the saw outside fired it up and made sure it flung oil off to the tip of the bar. He also spent time showing me the way Stihl saws should be started. I knew all was fine before I left the store. I think most saw starting problems are with the method people employ to pull the string. I've seen many people try drop start method and it is hell on the rope and recoil spring, not to mention unsafe.
 

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Is this model an M tronic autotune saw? I just got a 661cmr and had to get used to always starting in the "start" position (which is the normal choke position) even when warm or hot. Or do you mean harder to pull the rope? Which could mean your saw has broken in some with a resultant increase in compression.
 

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Is this model an M tronic autotune saw? I just got a 661cmr and had to get used to always starting in the "start" position (which is the normal choke position) even when warm or hot. Or do you mean harder to pull the rope? Which could mean your saw has broken in some with a resultant increase in compression.
No it is the largest saw in the "homeowner" line. You need to move up to the "professional" line to get the M Tronic ignition. Your saw should also have a decompression release.

I was talking about pulling the rope to start the saw.
 

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When I purchased my ms250 the dealer filled it up with gas and oil took the saw outside fired it up and made sure it flung oil off to the tip of the bar. He also spent time showing me the way Stihl saws should be started. I knew all was fine before I left the store. I think most saw starting problems are with the method people employ to pull the string. I've seen many people try drop start method and it is hell on the rope and recoil spring, not to mention unsafe.
The Stihl sales guy filled & started my saw in front of me. He asked me if I wanted to try starting it. I was in a hurry working 2 jobs so I said no.
Soon as I pulled the rope starter at home I realized my mistake.

To start it I hold the back handle between my legs/thighs. Then use my 2 hands to hold the saw & pull the rope.
 
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