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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys. I am building a stone ramp leading up to the rear of my garage where I park my 1025r. Here is a pic…

Garage.jpg

I have some flat large rocks (average about 20” in diameter and about six+ inches thick. I’d like to build a ramp up to the garage. Can anyone tell me the best foundation for the flat rocks that will keep them in place when I drive over them with the tractor, and so that they won’t heave during the frost/thaw cycles we get here in Vermont? They say to go down at least 4 feet when putting in a foundation, but I don’t think that is necessary for a stone ramp. I have quite a bit of ¾” crushed stone left over from another project. I was thinking of doing the following:

- Scoop out 8” to 12" of the existing soil
- Compact it with a gas powered tamper
- Put down 6” to 8” of the ¾” crushed stone
- Put a layer of road fabric on top of the ¾”
- Put 4” to 6” of hard-pack type material on top of that
- Set the stones in and fill joints with a joint type sand

Does this sound like the right way to do this?

Thanks for your help.
 

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Can we see how the roof line looks in relation to the garage door.
I'd be looking to put down about 6" of crusher run. Seems to me digging down and replacing the dirt with stone will provide a place for water to collect, freeze and heave.
 

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I wouldn't dig much out. You all ready have the stone and gravel fill you need . If it gets moved by the frost, all your out is your time. If you do it the " right way" by digging down below the frost line it may still move.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Can we see how the roof line looks in relation to the garage door.
I'd be looking to put down about 6" of crusher run. Seems to me digging down and replacing the dirt with stone will provide a place for water to collect, freeze and heave.
The garage door is on the gable end so there shouldn't be too much water. Here is a full pic of the back of the house.

Back.jpg

There probably is a good amount of sand that was used to backfill against the foundation - maybe out about two to three feet.
 

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How about remove the soil as you described; compact the crap out of it, put down a 6" or so layer of compacted road base, which out here is almost sand like, then the pavers followed by the joint sand?

You might check Pavestone www.pavestone.com and check out their instructions to get some ideas.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Did they mention anything dealing with snow removal?
I did inquire about that if I use their pavers in front of my garage doors (about 10 - 15 feet out.) One has to be careful when plowing so as to not chip the edges of the paver stones. I think if you are doing your own plowing it may be OK as you can keep a close eye on not dropping the blade right on the surface. It needs to be up a bit with the blade shoes. I don't know that I'd trust the people I've had do our driveway. I ask them every year to try not to scrap too low but they always do and 1/2 my driveway hardpac ends up on the lawn. I'd really like to get a snow blower for the 1025r but at around $3500 (front mount) it is out of the budget for now. I may buy a front mount blade to do some plowing when the plow guy can't come for many hours, which happens often. Sometimes we are stranded up here for a day.

These guys www.ratchetrake.com make a "Snow Edge" which looks cool. It probably won't damage the pavers.

For my rear ramp I was planning on using 6 to 8" thick flat rocks that we used to build a rock wall. I'll probably just sweep that.
 
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