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I want to get a 30 gallon plastic drum to store diesel to feed my JD 1025R. I would much rather have a steel drum but the plastic ones I have seen are far cheaper. I know, especially the plastic drums need to be sheltered from the sun to avoid algae. I guess; my question is what is the best plastic drum at a cheap price and where to get it. Thanks in advance!


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I’ve never heard of algae growing in a diesel container but you can get a locking lid steel drum with a bung and vent at the local recycle yard for 10 bucks a pop if they have any around.
 

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I want to get a 30 gallon plastic drum to store diesel to feed my JD 1025R. I would much rather have a steel drum but the plastic ones I have seen are far cheaper. I know, especially the plastic drums need to be sheltered from the sun to avoid algae. I guess; my question is what is the best plastic drum at a cheap price and where to get it. Thanks in advance!


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I’ve never heard of algae growing in a diesel container but you can get a locking lid steel drum with a bung and vent at the local recycle yard for 10 bucks a pop if they have any around.
Algae in diesel fuel storage tanks is more common than you might think.

https://www.bellperformance.com/bell-performs-blog/recognizing-diesel-fuel-algae

The problem with steel drums is it's not IF they will start to rust but WHEN. A lot of folks with steel drums are shocked when they find the inside has accumulated significant rust resulting in fuel contamination. That is one reason the poly tanks have started to become so popular.

Below is an informative YT video showing rust in a steel drum. If you aren't familiar with this guy he is incredibly meticulous to the point of being semi-OCD.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05Ma4uEoNWA
 

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Algae in diesel fuel storage tanks is more common than you might think.

https://www.bellperformance.com/bell-performs-blog/recognizing-diesel-fuel-algae

The problem with steel drums is it's not IF they will start to rust but WHEN. A lot of folks with steel drums are shocked when they find the inside has accumulated significant rust resulting in fuel contamination. That is one reason the poly tanks have started to become so popular.

Below is an informative YT video showing rust in a steel drum. If you aren't familiar with this guy he is incredibly meticulous to the point of being semi-OCD.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05Ma4uEoNWA
Not just algae, but bacteria and fungi will also grow in diesel fuel, especially biodiesel. Those bacteria and fungi can degrade the fuel. They need water in the fuel in order to propagate, and their growth is aided by warm temps and sunlight.

As I try to come up with diesel fuel storage options that don't involve trying to muscle 5 gallon cans at awkward angles, I've finally decided that I need to have a storage plan other than 5 gallon cans. I've been wrestling with how much to store, where to store it, and in what kind of container. I considered poly containers vs steel vs stainless steel. Ultimately, I opted for 30 gallons in a steel drum. Here's my thought process FWIW. Sorry if they seem kind of random:

  • I don't want the diesel fuel I'm storing to be sitting around, especially in a partially-filled barrel. Partially-filled barrels, especially larger ones (55 gallons) will suffer more condensation and water accumulation. Diesel fuel will degrade based on bacterial/fungal growth, as well as sludging up based on algea formation.
  • If water accumulates, rust can form. This can lead to filtering problems (plugged filters).
  • If water accumulates, bacteria, fungi, and algae can form. This is more likely if there is low fuel turnover, if the fuel is stored where it can get warmer (outside), and if sunlight is available in a plastic container.
  • It seemed apparent to me that in order to minimize condensation, I needed to be able to keep the drum mostly filled, therefore it had to be easy to fill.
  • Since I would be storing inside the garage to minimize temp changes, I wanted a small footprint. Storing on a pallet is a no-go because I didn't want to waste the floor space
  • Maneuvering the barrel into the back of my truck on anything other than a pallet was going to be dicey. I wanted loading and unloading the barrel to/from the truck to be quick, simple, and painless --> tractor up to the barrel, fork it, load it, drive to the gas pump, fill it, drive it home, unload it.
  • So it came down to 30 gallons, so as to provide more turnover rather than less, to have smaller floor footprint, and to be easier to load into the truck.
  • The choice was now steel vs plastic. I found new carbon steel 30 gallon drums running around $100. New blue poly drums running around $60. Stainless steel, which would have been perfect, run around $500-$600.
  • I'd be storing outside, making me less comfortable with the poly drums, as well as concerns about how well the plastic bung would stand up to the steel crank pump that I'd be screwing into it and cranking, and I was concerned about how I'd be loading the barrel into the truck.
Ultimately, I opted for a new, lined, 30 gallon tight-head steel drum with a Fill-Rite FR112 crank pump, a 3/4" NPT filter. It will be rolling around in the garage on a little drum dolly




but when it needs filling, I'll load it into the back of my truck by tractoring up to the barrel and lifting it with the drum fork thing. This thing is reported not to work with plastic drums, thereby limiting my options for easily lifting it into the back of my truck to fill it with diesel.

 

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I want to get a 30 gallon plastic drum to store diesel to feed my JD 1025R. I would much rather have a steel drum but the plastic ones I have seen are far cheaper. I know, especially the plastic drums need to be sheltered from the sun to avoid algae. I guess; my question is what is the best plastic drum at a cheap price and where to get it. Thanks in advance!


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Things will grow in steel tanks also not just plastic. Either will require a bio guard additive for long term storage of D.
 
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Not just algae, but bacteria and fungi will also grow in diesel fuel, especially biodiesel. Those bacteria and fungi can degrade the fuel. They need water in the fuel in order to propagate, and their growth is aided by warm temps and sunlight.

As I try to come up with diesel fuel storage options that don't involve trying to muscle 5 gallon cans at awkward angles, I've finally decided that I need to have a storage plan other than 5 gallon cans. I've been wrestling with how much to store, where to store it, and in what kind of container. I considered poly containers vs steel vs stainless steel. Ultimately, I opted for 30 gallons in a steel drum. Here's my thought process FWIW. Sorry if they seem kind of random:

  • I don't want the diesel fuel I'm storing to be sitting around, especially in a partially-filled barrel. Partially-filled barrels, especially larger ones (55 gallons) will suffer more condensation and water accumulation. Diesel fuel will degrade based on bacterial/fungal growth, as well as sludging up based on algea formation.
  • If water accumulates, rust can form. This can lead to filtering problems (plugged filters).
  • If water accumulates, bacteria, fungi, and algae can form. This is more likely if there is low fuel turnover, if the fuel is stored where it can get warmer (outside), and if sunlight is available in a plastic container.
  • It seemed apparent to me that in order to minimize condensation, I needed to be able to keep the drum mostly filled, therefore it had to be easy to fill.
  • Since I would be storing inside the garage to minimize temp changes, I wanted a small footprint. Storing on a pallet is a no-go because I didn't want to waste the floor space
  • Maneuvering the barrel into the back of my truck on anything other than a pallet was going to be dicey. I wanted loading and unloading the barrel to/from the truck to be quick, simple, and painless --> tractor up to the barrel, fork it, load it, drive to the gas pump, fill it, drive it home, unload it.
  • So it came down to 30 gallons, so as to provide more turnover rather than less, to have smaller floor footprint, and to be easier to load into the truck.
  • The choice was now steel vs plastic. I found new carbon steel 30 gallon drums running around $100. New blue poly drums running around $60. Stainless steel, which would have been perfect, run around $500-$600.
  • I'd be storing outside, making me less comfortable with the poly drums, as well as concerns about how well the plastic bung would stand up to the steel crank pump that I'd be screwing into it and cranking, and I was concerned about how I'd be loading the barrel into the truck.
Ultimately, I opted for a new, lined, 30 gallon tight-head steel drum with a Fill-Rite FR112 crank pump, a 3/4" NPT filter. It will be rolling around in the garage on a little drum dolly

[img]

but when it needs filling, I'll load it into the back of my truck by tractoring up to the barrel and lifting it with the drum fork thing. This thing is reported not to work with plastic drums, thereby limiting my options for easily lifting it into the back of my truck to fill it with diesel.

[img]
[/QUOTE]
Most of the parts arrived so I put this together tonight. Looks like it will meet my needs. We'll know soon.

[IMG]http://ssequine.net/fuel drums.jpg
 

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As a side note, putting this diesel refueling thing together along with my scrapping and replacing my 150 gallon gasoline storage tank and reading about options....I was amused and a little astonished to note that it's illegal to pump your own gas and your own diesel at gas stations in Oregon and New Jersey. I had no idea. What's even funnier is to read the published comments from gas customers as well as the blathering of politicians in those states that try to justify such a silly set of legislative prohibitions.
 

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As a side note, putting this diesel refueling thing together along with my scrapping and replacing my 150 gallon gasoline storage tank and reading about options....I was amused and a little astonished to note that it's illegal to pump your own gas and your own diesel at gas stations in Oregon and New Jersey. I had no idea. What's even funnier is to read the published comments from gas customers as well as the blathering of politicians in those states that try to justify such a silly set of legislative prohibitions.
So I knew there were some states that this was the case, but it brings up a question. Can you fill "storage" cans for your equipment/toys?
I would assume... but you never know. :dunno:
 

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So I knew there were some states that this was the case, but it brings up a question. Can you fill "storage" cans for your equipment/toys?
I would assume... but you never know. :dunno:
If it's more than 109 gallons (IIRC), the container has to be DOT certified to be on the road. Not really applicable in my situation since I'll be storing the fuel at home and whatever I store it in, it has to be small enough be able to lift with my 1023E, put it in the bed of my truck, and drive it over to the convenience store to fill with diesel. I opted for 30 gallons since it will be really easy to load and take to the store, and so that I'd have enough turnover that I can minimize condensation/water along with bacteria/fungi/algae. I have a 150 gallon tank at home for gasoline, but I use that gas a lot more than the diesel so it has to be bigger. In that case, I can get the premium non-oxygenated delivered whenever I need it, as long as it's more than 100 gallons, which allows me to avoid the delivery fee.
 

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I was amused and a little astonished to note that it's illegal to pump your own gas and your own diesel at gas stations in Oregon and New Jersey.
I don’t know about New Jersey, but you can legally pump your own diesel at stations in Oregon, just not gas. I’ve not had anyone try and stop me when pumping diesel. The last time pumping your own fuel came up for a vote it resulted in a law that in rural areas of the state where the population is below a certain number and its during off hours, you can pump your own gas too. That translates to the middle of nowhere at midnight.

And, you’re right. It’s extremely stupid. I’m not sure of the reasoning behind it anymore. It used to be a safety reason, but now I think it’s more of trying to keep someone employed. Hopefully another measure will be on the ballot in the future that allows it and it passes.
 
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I don’t know about New Jersey, but you can legally pump your own diesel at stations in Oregon, just not gas. I’ve not had anyone try and stop me when pumping diesel. The last time pumping your own fuel came up for a vote it resulted in a law that in rural areas of the state where the population is below a certain number and its during off hours, you can pump your own gas too. That translates to the middle of nowhere at midnight.

And, you’re right. It’s extremely stupid. I’m not sure of the reasoning behind it anymore. It used to be a safety reason, but now I think it’s more of trying to keep someone employed. Hopefully another measure will be on the ballot in the future that allows it and it passes.
Heh heh I'll never forget the time I was travelling in New Jersey. Even though I live in PA I don't go to New Jersey very often and it had been many years since my last trip. I pulled into a gas station, jumped out, grabbed the pump handle and started to remove my filler cap. This was in the days before pay at the pump was common place and at most self-serve stations you pumped your gas and then went inside to pay.

Anyway, just as I was removing my filler cap this station attendant came running out waving his arms and yelling something about pumping gas. I responded saying "I got it" and thinking "Wow, these guys really want to be helpful". When he reached the pump he said something about not being able to self pump fuel. I was like "Huh?' but as I handed him the pump handle I said, "OK, have at it".

I later learned about the no self-service rule. I couldn't help but think maybe they should modify those "Welcome to New Jersey" signs and add a note at the bottom saying "It is illegal to pump your own gasoline at a filling station". :)
 

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So I knew there were some states that this was the case, but it brings up a question. Can you fill "storage" cans for your equipment/toys?
I would assume... but you never know. :dunno:
I live in Oregon and have never had an issue pumping my own gas. But at the gas station it is nice to not have to get out and pump especially in winter and it provides jobs
 

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I live in Oregon and have never had an issue pumping my own gas. But at the gas station it is nice to not have to get out and pump especially in winter and it provides jobs
In PA it’s rare to find a station where they pump for you. Probably 95% are self serve.

However the little local chain where I buy my fuel has fuel jockeys - even at their truck stops. If they are really busy I will hop out and pump my own in the summer but in the winter I am spoiled. I’ll wait a minute or two so I don’t have to get out of my truck.
 

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Most of the parts arrived so I put this together tonight. Looks like it will meet my needs. We'll know soon.

I wish I could mock up this setup. I have to have my son help me load my truck and fill my tractor. A 15-20 gallon setup would be nice to a void the whole gas station commute and inconvenience. Perhaps one day
 
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I wish I could mock up this setup. I have to have my son help me load my truck and fill my tractor. A 15-20 gallon setup would be nice to a void the whole gas station commute and inconvenience. Perhaps one day
I liked the 30 gallon tank for its smaller footprint, and the fact that 30 gallons means I won't have unused fuel sitting around - I anticipate filling the drum about every 2-3 weeks. Because of that, I wanted to be able to load it and unload it easily, so I could drive it to the convenience store about a mile up the road.

 

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I liked the 30 gallon tank for its smaller footprint, and the fact that 30 gallons means I won't have unused fuel sitting around - I anticipate filling the drum about every 2-3 weeks. Because of that, I wanted to be able to load it and unload it easily, so I could drive it to the convenience store about a mile up the road.

Why are diesel pump handles always dirty like that? I guess they never clean them...

Glad I have my fuel delivered - I can keep my own handle clean.

When I was thinking of getting a diesel pickup the one thing that turned me off is having to deal with those dirty pumps.
 

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Diesel fuel is oil, it doesn’t really evaporate like gasoline does.
 

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Why are diesel pump handles always dirty like that? I guess they never clean them...

Glad I have my fuel delivered - I can keep my own handle clean.

When I was thinking of getting a diesel pickup the one thing that turned me off is having to deal with those dirty pumps.
This particular store has glove dispensers on the pump, as well as hand cleaner. The glove dispenser is usually empty. I generally have a pair of work gloves in the truck, but I'm not sure they're any cleaner on the inside than the pump handle is on the outside.

The oil company delivers non-oxygenated premium for my 150 gallon gasoline tank, but they charge a hefty delivery fee if they're pumping less than 100 gallons.They'll fill my 30 gallon diesel drum when they come to bring gasoline and won't charge delivery, but it all would depend on whether I need diesel and gasoline at the same time, which will probably be rare.
 

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This particular store has glove dispensers on the pump, as well as hand cleaner. The glove dispenser is usually empty. I generally have a pair of work gloves in the truck, but I'm not sure they're any cleaner on the inside than the pump handle is on the outside.

The oil company delivers non-oxygenated premium for my 150 gallon gasoline tank, but they charge a hefty delivery fee if they're pumping less than 100 gallons.They'll fill my 30 gallon diesel drum when they come to bring gasoline and won't charge delivery, but it all would depend on whether I need diesel and gasoline at the same time, which will probably be rare.
I get my tractor tank (150 gallon) filled when I get my heating fuel delivered. Same fuel from the same truck - no delivery charge since I buy 600+ gallons once a year.

And before it starts - I verified from my supplier that when they deliver heating fuel in the summer it’s exactly the same as off road diesel.
 
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