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I opened up my shop this morning, and noticed something strange. The dirt, sawdust and debris that normally filled one of the stress joints had somehow made its way up, out of the joint and was wind-rowed on the sides next to the joint. The shop had been shut up, so I knew that the wind was not responsible; the only other thing I could think of was that someone had run a small stick or wire down the joint; but no one had been in there but me.

I studied it for a minute; then I took my toe and pushed the debris back into the joint. In a few seconds, the debris flipped back out, and quite vigorously I might add. That gave me a clue; I took a small stick and ran it down the crack and sure enough, the crack was full of ant lions! They had themselves a ready made pit-fall trap for ants and other small insects. I thought this was indeed very strange; I have seen them take up residence in cracks in the sidewalk, but I've never seen anything like this. I guess you learn something every day; today was no exception.
 

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I always called them "Doodle Bugs"! As a kid, I used to take a stick and gently move it around the top of their lair, to watch them kick the dirt back out!

They can be found easily enough under many of my loafing sheds, since the sand is to their liking in those areas, but I've not seen them as you described.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I always called them "Doodle Bugs"! As a kid, I used to take a stick and gently move it around the top of their lair, to watch them kick the dirt back out!

They can be found easily enough under many of my loafing sheds, since the sand is to their liking in those areas, but I've not seen them as you described.
Yeah, "Doodle Bugs" is what we called them too. Growing up, I lived in the sand hills near the Cimarron River, so I have seen millions of the little buggers. We used to catch ants and put then in the cones and watch the Doodle Bugs flip the sand out until they finally caught the ant. They are not so common around here, but being next to a creek, there is plenty of sand for them to flourish...and ants too! Time to bug-bomb my shop again I guess.
 

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Back in the old days we used to go the flea circus just to see the ant lion act. Never thought they made such tiny whips and chairs!
 

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I must say I have never heard of these insects. However, growing up we had a Ford Model A pickup truck we all called the Doodlebug.
 

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I must say I have never heard of these insects. However, growing up we had a Ford Model A pickup truck we all called the Doodlebug.
You really have led a sheltered and uneventful life by living up north all of it, Gizmo! :flag_of_truce:
 

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You really have led a sheltered and uneventful life by living up north all of it, Gizmo! :flag_of_truce:
Did you have a doodlebug vehicle?:tongue:
 

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You really have led a sheltered and uneventful life by living up north all of it, Gizmo! :flag_of_truce:
We've got them here in Michigan - I'm sure they're in NY as well. The doodlebug is actually the larval stage of a small dragonfly type bug

https://insects.tamu.edu/fieldguide/bimg127.html

You'll see them along beaches - look for small 1-2" diameter perfect cones in the sand. If you scoop down under the cone maybe an extra inch, when you sift the sand you'll find the doodlebug.
 

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