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I'm going to put some grass seed out on my newly cleared land thanks to my landscape rake. I guess I need to put straw over it. Is that the case? If so, how much? How thick/dense should it be? I've never tried to start grass from scratch until now. Any other tips that would be helpful to me?
 

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I think all you need is enough to keep moisture in and the dirt from drying out. Its not like you need several inches of it.

So shouldn't take much.
 

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The straw will also keep the seed from washing away during heavy rains. Like was stated earlier, you don't need much if you use it.
 

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I've heard that putting down a perennial grass seed with your regular seed works good. The perennial grass is very quick growing and helps with erosion.
 

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A friend of mine, who is into the landscaping business mixes oats with his normal grass seeds. Oats take hold very fast (and are heavy seeds that are not washed away that easy) and help the grass to get established.
 

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I've heard that putting down a perennial grass seed with your regular seed works good. The perennial grass is very quick growing and helps with erosion.
Wondering if you meant putting down an ANNUAL with your regular seed.

Its common to mix annual rye with your normal grass seed. It is cheap, comes up really really fast but wont be back the next year. Since the Rye comes up fast it helps protect the actual seed you are trying to grow and rye has some nutritional benefits to other vegitation around it including your new lawn grass.

So annual rye has value in stopping erosion, keeping the sun from baking the dirt for your other seed and nutritional value !

Look at the seed label and you will OFTEN see annual rye grass to help get things started.

These comments apply to my area (midwest) and may not apply other places. I have a friend in Arizona and was talking about grass recently and was amazed how little I know about grass in other parts of the country !
 

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I've heard that putting down a perennial grass seed with your regular seed works good. The perennial grass is very quick growing and helps with erosion.
Now I always thought "annual" seed germinated and grew faster than perennial grass, but it only lasts 1 season. If you look at the different seed types "contractor mix" has more annual seed to get coverage faster.

Just my 2 cents, and I've been wrong before.:laugh:
 

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A friend of mine, who is into the landscaping business mixes oats with his normal grass seeds. Oats take hold very fast (and are heavy seeds that are not washed away that easy) and help the grass to get established.
We have done the same. Oats takeoff quick.
 

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Wondering if you meant putting down an ANNUAL with your regular seed.

Its common to mix annual rye with your normal grass seed. It is cheap, comes up really really fast but wont be back the next year. Since the Rye comes up fast it helps protect the actual seed you are trying to grow and rye has some nutritional benefits to other vegitation around it including your new lawn grass.

So annual rye has value in stopping erosion, keeping the sun from baking the dirt for your other seed and nutritional value !

Look at the seed label and you will OFTEN see annual rye grass to help get things started.

These comments apply to my area (midwest) and may not apply other places. I have a friend in Arizona and was talking about grass recently and was amazed how little I know about grass in other parts of the country !
Yes, this is what I meant. I've heard it works very well when starting a new lawn.
 
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