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Well, today was not a very good day. This is one of the issues I ran into with my 1025. I was looking around to install an auxiliary power switch for my new sprayer and when I removed the right rear tire, I noticed one bolt just spun loose. I have never removed this tire before.

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A few questions -

How safe is it to operate with only 4 lugs?

How easy would it be to tap a new hole?

How much does the whole hub cost in case I wanted to replace it?
 

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That's a bummer. New rear axle is $354. I can think of a couple ways to fix it (assuming the axle is steel). Weld the hole back up, drill it and re-tap it to the original size. A new bolt and you are back in business. You could also just put a bolt with a nut on the backside assuming you can find a longer bolt with the tapered shoulder.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You could also just put a bolt with a nut on the backside assuming you can find a longer bolt with the tapered shoulder.
Brilliant! I guess I've been so blind with rage that I didn't even think of that.
 

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Well, today was not a very good day. This is one of the issues I ran into with my 1025. I was looking around to install an auxiliary power switch for my new sprayer and when I removed the right rear tire, I noticed one bolt just spun loose. I have never removed this tire before.

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View attachment 399554
View attachment 399562



A few questions -

How safe is it to operate with only 4 lugs?

How easy would it be to tap a new hole?

How much does the whole hub cost in case I wanted to replace it?
This machine still under warranty? If so call your dealer and tell them what you found. See if they can do anything for you.

It's safe to cut the grass for now but you don't want to leave it this way. I'd hold off on any heavy ground engaging use until it is fixed.

Check with the dealer or on line for a axle price.

The way to fix the bad hole the correct way is with a thread insert. It will come in a kit usually. You have to drill out the hole with a specific size bit. They tap the hole with the supplied tool. Then screw the insert into the hole. After the repair the hole will accept the stock size bolt. You also need to make sure it is drilled and tapped straight.

Do not drill the hole & wheel oversized to use a bigger bolt. That's ghetto.

Forgot to mention buying a new lug/bolt if that's not obvious.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That's ghetto.
Hahaha. Yes. I will look into your suggestions, too. The machine is not under warranty anymore. However, I may call and see what they can do.

Thanks for your time.
 

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The way to fix the bad hole the correct way is with a thread insert. It will come in a kit usually. You have to drill out the hole with a specific size bit. They tap the hole with the supplied tool. Then screw the insert into the hole. After the repair the hole will accept the stock size bolt. You also need to make sure it is drilled and tapped straight.

Do not drill the hole & wheel oversized to use a bigger bolt. That's ghetto.

This.

Timesert's or Heli-Coil's are what should be used here.
 

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Brilliant! I guess I've been so blind with rage that I didn't even think of that.


This idea is also ghetto. Not as much as an oversized bolt but still ghetto. lol

If you don't feel comfortable with doing a proper repair. Take it to a shop that you can trust. It would also save you the cost of the Heli-Coil kit. Normally the shop will just change you for the insert and labor to install it.

Either way it will be way cheaper than just the cost of a new axle. It might also save you the labor to remove and install the axle. The hole could be drilled way straighter and easier on a drill press vs a hand drill with the axle still in the transmission. It would be up to the shop doing the repair.

Good luck
 

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A Heli coil should be no problem here.

Take your time and be careful drilling the old threads out as straight as you can for the Heli coil tap and the Heli coil.
 

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A Heli coil should be no problem here.

Take your time and be careful drilling the old threads out as straight as you can for the Heli coil tap and the Heli coil.
If you have the tooling (once you get over 1/2 inch fasteners this can be a problem).....

Generally speaking, a twist drill will continually self-center in a existing hole as long as you don't try to hog out too much at once or force it. Assuming a 5/8" SAE (fine) lug bolt, the existing threaded hole is 9/16 in diameter. The Heli coil tap will require a 5/8" hole AT A MINIMUM for it's tap (you have to clear out all the existing thread remnants), so you can start with, say, a 19/32 drill (if you have one...) and work your way up to the repair kit tap drill size.

This is a lot easier with fasteners less than 1/2" since even a modestly equipped home shop has a set of twist drills in 1/64" increments up to 1/2". Note that I am assuming US UTS fasteners. The same idea holds if it is metric, with the exception that the tooling is even rarer in an American home shop, or you have to be handy at converting inches to mm. :banghead:

Al
 

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They make lug nuts in this size. I'd run a tap through the hole (same thread) put a new bolt in from the inside of the hub out (like a wheel stud), and put a lug nut on that one.

When I took my one wheel off, a few of the bolts felt a little tight, the threads looked OK so I carefully buzzed them in and out several times with oil until they felt better. Another stupidly designed feature plus brainless, nose-picking, 18 year old scrubs working at the dealers = stripped or cross-threaded wheel bolts.
 

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Yea, first time I pulled the right rear on my 1025R one of the bolts was stripped. Took it to the dealer,
they ordered in the helicoil kit for it and fixed it at no charge to me about 6 weeks outside of warranty.
Found it the Thursday before memorial day weekend, showed bolt to dealer on Friday morning, they told me
to torque the other 4 to spec and use it normally for the weekend, just checking torque on the other 4 every day,
then bring them the tractor on Tuesday morning.
 

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If you've not seen or heard of a helicoil they are not complicated. You will NOT be drilling into a blind hole so this would be an easy fix. Here is a video showing how they work. If you can run a drill and have an idea of how a tap works its an easy DIY project.
 

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They make lug nuts in this size. I'd run a tap through the hole (same thread) put a new bolt in from the inside of the hub out (like a wheel stud), and put a lug nut on that one.

When I took my one wheel off, a few of the bolts felt a little tight, the threads looked OK so I carefully buzzed them in and out several times with oil until they felt better. Another stupidly designed feature plus brainless, nose-picking, 18 year old scrubs working at the dealers = stripped or cross-threaded wheel bolts.
Brainless, nosepicking scrubs? Dealer? Get it right.. That's knuckle dragging, donut licking, beer guzzling grease monkeys. And its not the dealer. . its the "Stealership". Geesh!

Sent from my LGL52VL using Tapatalk
 

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Every fastener on anything that's not "hand built" (i.e. the manufacturer is fabricating and fitting parts during assembly process) is torqued to spec on the line. This fault shouldn't happen from the factory unless a part is seriously out of spec.

Why would the dealer be messing with the wheels prior to delivery? Do they regularly change ag tires to turf (and vice versa) as part of the delivery process? Or something else?

Al
 

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Every fastener on anything that's not "hand built" (i.e. the manufacturer is fabricating and fitting parts during assembly process) is torqued to spec on the line. This fault shouldn't happen from the factory unless a part is seriously out of spec.

Why would the dealer be messing with the wheels prior to delivery? Do they regularly change ag tires to turf (and vice versa) as part of the delivery process? Or something else?
On some models there is some assembly required at the dealer - including attaching the wheels. In other cases the wheels may have been removed to swap to the wide position, or to fill will fluid, or to switch from R4 to R3 or visa versa. Or... the tires may have had to be removed to install some other accessory purchased with the tractor. There are all sorts of reasons why the dealer might remove the wheels.

I was concerned the rear lugs on my 2720 may have been stripped the first time I removed them as the dealer had tightened them so much that the little lock washers under the lug bolts had split and started to unwind.

I don't think there is a lot of "torquing" happening outside the factory floor.
 

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They make lug nuts in this size. I'd run a tap through the hole (same thread) put a new bolt in from the inside of the hub out (like a wheel stud), and put a lug nut on that one.

When I took my one wheel off, a few of the bolts felt a little tight, the threads looked OK so I carefully buzzed them in and out several times with oil until they felt better. Another stupidly designed feature plus brainless, nose-picking, 18 year old scrubs working at the dealers = stripped or cross-threaded wheel bolts.
Brainless, nosepicking scrubs? Dealer? Get it right.. That's knuckle dragging, donut licking, beer guzzling grease monkeys. And its not the dealer. . its the "Stealership". Geesh!

Sent from my LGL52VL using Tapatalk
Thanks for the correction!
 

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Every fastener on anything that's not "hand built" (i.e. the manufacturer is fabricating and fitting parts during assembly process) is torqued to spec on the line. This fault shouldn't happen from the factory unless a part is seriously out of spec.

Why would the dealer be messing with the wheels prior to delivery? Do they regularly change ag tires to turf (and vice versa) as part of the delivery process? Or something else?

Al
Yep, like someone else said many reasons why, including mounting the hardware for a MMM. My tractor was a MESS when I first got it thanks to my dealer's "service" department. I could have done a better job in my sleep setting it up.
 

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One of the steps in the pdi check list is to torque the wheels to spec. We have had quite a few 1 series strip out. Axles were replaced.
Also I believe the OM has you torque check wheel bolts at 10hrs along with the loader mounts if installed.

Sent from my LGL52VL using Tapatalk
 
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