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Discussion Starter #1
I am fairly new to working on old tractors and need some help.
I have a 620 that has been sitting indoors for 25 years but the motor is stuck.
For a couple of weeks I have been squirting the sparkplug hole with PB blaster.
I have been trying to move the flywheel back and forth with a bar I made that goes in the casting holes.
No movement so I have been taking parts off, I tried to take the head off this weekend.
I had 4 full studs come out pretty easily, the other 3 studs are still in the head but the nuts came off easily.
The head is really stuck to the block. I tried to put small bottle jacks between the block and the head.
I tried gently beating on it with a soft hammer. None of this worked either. Any ideas?
I was thinking the three remaining bolts are hanging me up and maybe I need to heat them up with a torch.
Also I see some people fill the spark plug hole with penetrating oil, maybe that is something that I should do,
it makes sense that the fluid isn't getting completely around the cylinder.
Any help would be much appreciated.

FYI the oil was black but looked good, not cloudy. The antifreeze looked good too, just a little rusty, still had some green in it.
 

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My B John Deere was stuck and I filled the cylinders with diesel fuel and left it for about a month. Then I used a bar to bump forward and back on the flywheel and was able to get it to break loose. It had been sitting for over 30 years in a quanset.

Best of luck to you.
 

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Filling the cylinders with some sort of light oil like diesel fuel is a good bet. A little acetone mixed in will allow it to migrate a little further. Patience is key here. :good2:
 

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If one of the cylinders has the valves closed,,,
put a grease fitting in the spark plug hole with adapter fittings.

Pump in grease with a grease gun,
You will develop way over 100,000 pounds of force,,, something will move. :good2:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Still Stuck

I'm letting it sit for a while with some Kroil penetrating fluid in it, still seems partially full in the spark plug holes.
I have heard of the grease technique, it just seems messy, but it might come to that.
Has anyone ever tried pumping air into the sparkplug hole? The though process is that the air pressure forces the penetrating fluid through and around the rings. I assume I would have to make a plate to seal off the intake to hold air?
I can tell that the piston is closest to the spark plug on the right side of the tractor,
I assume that's the side I want to start with?

I really appreciate all your help, it makes me feel like I'm on the right track.
 

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Hiya,

When dealing with rusted together components and trying to get oil to get into all the areas to work, it's best to heat cycle the components as the thermal changes cause the metal to expand and contract with heating and cooling thus wicking the oil deeper than just sitting there.

Simplest was is to get a torpedo heater, aim it at the block and let it run for about 45 minutes, get that puppy about 200 degrees then turn it off and let it cool on it's own, repeat this a few times and things should come apart a lot easier.
 

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I second the heat and cool approach. The expansion will happen at difderent rates for the cylinder vs. the rings vs. The pistons if you heat it externally. While in the heating mode I would be bumping the flywheel to encourage some movement.

As far as using air, you will only be able to make shop air pressures, use the grease method. If you are worried about the mess of grease, first fill the cylinder with oil then apply the grease gun. Oil can't be compressed so adding the grease will put the pressure on the oil. This will either move the piston in the cylinder or push the oil past the rings. You can pick the viscosity of the oil to accomplish what you want. If you want to press oil past the rings use a low viz oil. If you want to use pressure to move the piston you should choose a higher viz oil.

If your valves aren't closed you can remove the rocker arms to lift the valves to their seats. Be careful as the compressed valve springs will provide rapid lift when the last thread comes off - can ruin lights in the garage ceiling or take out an eye...use caution here.

If you are working the grease gun in one cylinder make sure the valves are open or the spark plugs are out on the other cylinders or you will break connecting rods.

I would also drop the oil pan if you can so you can see what is happening with the oil in the cylider. If oil begins to gush but the piston doesn't move I would switch cyliders as the rings have given up their hold on that hole meaning that is not the siezed cylider or a portion of the ring has let go/deteriorated beyond it's ability to make a seal.

Good luck, keep us posted.

Sent from my SM-G920P using Tapatalk
 

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I vote against pressurizing it in any way.
I didn't state that in my post, but I agree. Using pressure to move the pistons should be the last resort. You can easily damage many parts using pressure, especially the pressures from a grease gun. They are ridiculously powerful, one wouldn't realize it by just looking.

Heat would be my go-to after soaking it well with penetrating oil (which you have already done). Only after many heating cycles have failed would I move to more aggressive measures.
 

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The only way to go for me would be,

Penetrating oil and patience.
Penetrating oil and more patience.
Penetrating oil and even more patience.
Penetrating oil and more than you can bear patience.
And then patience, patience, and lastly more patience.

This thing will free up, you just have to out last it. :thumbup1gif:
 

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Back in the early 72's I freed up the engine on my JD BO by filling cylinders level with spark plug holes with Kerosene BUT Kerosene was a lot cheaper per gallon then than now. Let BO sit for 2 weeks put flywheel turning tool in flywheel hub and turned engine over. BO runs anytime I desire to start it.
 

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On the heat cool cycle thing. If it has a block heater, why not try plugging it in?
 

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Probably more effective to heat it from the outside in and work the flywheel while it is heating. The reason is that you want the block/cylinder to expand faster than the rings so that it will break free. The higher the differential in temperature the more likely it is to break free. Warming it through the cooling system will apply heat in an even fashion.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I don't have a topedo heater, but I do have a torch, if I was careful not to overdo it could I use that from the outside of the block?
 

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Probably more effective to heat it from the outside in and work the flywheel while it is heating. The reason is that you want the block/cylinder to expand faster than the rings so that it will break free. The higher the differential in temperature the more likely it is to break free. Warming it through the cooling system will apply heat in an even fashion.
You "could" but I don't know if you "should"... Personally I would steer clear of using a gas flame because of the expense and likelihood of charring the paint....that said however....

You could use a torch to focus your heat on the area of the cylinder where the rings of the piston are in contact. Using a torch also gives you a more rapid expansion in a smaller area which would be good to move the metal around. The downside is that it will give you a more rapid expansion in a smaller area that will move the metal around giving you a better chance of warping or breaking something unintentionally. :(

The goal here is to release the bond, however time is safest way to accomplish it. If you are in a hurry you could chuck the engine in a lathe and bore out the piston and rings and be done by dinner time but the practicality of you having a large enough lathe to perform that step is somewhat unlikely. :lol:

I am like you, when I decide it is time to do something, it should already be done! Ultimately it is your equipment and your decision. The advice given here is *FREE* so take it for what it is worth. There are several remedies listed here that are all viable the only difference between them is how many broken parts are there in the end.
 
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