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Discussion Starter #1
I have 100 plus metal "T" fence posts to install . . . they are 7 ft in length . . . will have another 150 to install later in the year

Anyone have any tricks on how to plant the posts with either the 1025r FEL or the back-hoe?

Much appreciate any info or suggestions you may have.

Yes I know about the pipe sliding hammers but at my age an easier way would be great!
 

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Loader push

A loader bucket full of rock will either push them in or bend them, depending on the operator and the soil conditions. It really requires two people- one to operate the loader and the other to set the posts in position. It's also better to have something on the bottom of the loader to hold the post like a shallow inverted pipe cap tack welded to the bucket.

I'm not a huge fan of using a loader because it puts the "post" guy in a position where he/she is holding the posts while the loader bucket is coming down on top of the post. Even just reaching in from one side means part of their body is under a heavy weight not to mention the fun that can happen if the operator doesn't have a good touch on the controls. It's also a bit tricky to keep the posts vertical, at the proper depth and in line.

My suggestion would be to find some strong young kids and offer them a price per post to pound them in. If the ground is dry and hard, it's real work. If you can catch a wet spell the posts go in pretty easily.

Treefarmer
 

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There is no easy way. Wet dirt or sand are the only thing that makes it easier. After putting in thousands of them in with a picket pounder, the long tube used, I would follow Treefarmer advice and hire some kids to do it. The buckets tend to bend them or make them go in crooked more often than not.

Good luck,
WB
 

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The easy way is hire it done. We tried using the FEL and ended up with a bunch of bent post. It was also hard to keep them lined up. Look at bulletin boards around town or in classified ads for odd jobs.
 

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If you have that many to install why not invest in a gas-powered T-post driver? They are like $250 and at the end of the job you can keep it or sell it.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15EXPoBWg84[/QUOTE


That looks like the bomb! Oh where was that last year when I was putting my pool fence? I wonder how it does on aluminum square posts? :bigthumb:
 

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I just checked Everything Attachments and they have some 3point drivers but they start at $2800 and go up from there. You would probably need to go in business or have a LOT of acreage to fence in order to make it worth it.

The Titan driver listed isn't cheap either but at $700 I would be more inclined to fork that kind of money over than for a tractor mounted driver. I suppose you could probably rent a Titan driver?
 

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I've put in thousands of T posts with a loader bucket, but always using bigger tractors, not S/M/CUTs.
With 7' posts, I don't think the 1025 will reach high enough anyway...

If you get a post pounder with handles it works much better than just a capped pipe.
 

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I just checked Everything Attachments and they have some 3point drivers but they start at $2800 and go up from there. You would probably need to go in business or have a LOT of acreage to fence in order to make it worth it.

The Titan driver listed isn't cheap either but at $700 I would be more inclined to fork that kind of money over than for a tractor mounted driver. I suppose you could probably rent a Titan driver?
You can get the non-honda powered Titan for about ~$400 and the Honda powered one for ~$600. There are knock offs for cheaper than that.

Me and my buddy laid out 20 6' posts along a string and drove them all 2' into the ground in 5 minutes. That was more of a time trail and was more work than I normally like, but we wanted to see how quick it would go.

The gas drivers are nice and a ton easier than a manual driver, but they are still work. I bought mine with the thought that I would sell it when I get done with our property, but I may end up keeping it.
 

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Use a torch or a slicer on a angle grinder to cut the corners off the bottom to form a point. Goes in much better than trying to drive a blunt end in the ground.
On 250 T-posts? That's an awful lot of work.
 

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Put 50 in with a friend in MS once. He had a 650 with a loader. He had welded a pipe on the side of his bucket. The bucket filled with gravel pushed them right in. On the other side he had two pegs. Drop the over a t post tilt the bucket and lift and it pops them right back out of the ground.
 

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BTDT
A little light work beforehand saves a lot of extra heavy work when you wind up driving them by hand. JMO. Do as you see fit.
I'm sure it will. I could maybe see torching or plasma cutting them but grinding... no way. :)
 

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I'm sure it will. I could maybe see torching or plasma cutting them but grinding... no way. :)
I think he meant using a cut-off wheel in the grinder. They will make short work of it.
 

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If you have that many to install why not invest in a gas-powered T-post driver? They are like $250 and at the end of the job you can keep it or sell it.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15EXPoBWg84
I have a ground rod driver bit for my rotary hammer that works similar to the gas powered post drivers. The rapid vibration is what does the work. It sure beats using a hammer.

My first choice if I were in your shoes is to rent a gas powered post pounder, my next choice is buy one and then keep or sell it when the job is done. My last choice would be to hire one or more young, dumb and strong Moist Robots as they can be cranky and unreliable.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
THANKS for all of the positive feedback.

The T-posts I bought already have been cut to a point by the manufacturer . . .

I am going to get a gas or electric post-pounder per your recommendations

As noted above having someone under the bucket holding the t-post could be dangerous so I am not going that route

THANKS again.
 

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I have a ground rod driver bit for my rotary hammer that works similar to the gas powered post drivers. The rapid vibration is what does the work. It sure beats using a hammer.
Same here... I have a ground rod bit for my Dewalt SDS-Max demo hammer. It drives in 1/2" ground rods like a toothpick thru soft butter. I'll bet it would drive in T-posts if you made an adapter.
 

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THANKS for all of the positive feedback.

The T-posts I bought already have been cut to a point by the manufacturer . . .

I am going to get a gas or electric post-pounder per your recommendations

As noted above having someone under the bucket holding the t-post could be dangerous so I am not going that route

THANKS again.
Just be very careful as any repetitive motion which you aren't used to, can cause serious issues with your elbow and wrist tendons. I helped a friend power wash his driveway as he has arthritis in his hands pretty severely and he couldn't hang onto the 4,000 PSI power washer wand for more than a minute or two. I did it for him and as a result, the pulsation of the wand water pressure for several hours damaged the tendons in my elbow, much like Tennis Elbow. Not only was it quite painful, it took over a year for the injury to heal and it has always been more "fragile" ever since.

So regardless of what you use, if it involves a vibration or repetitive motion, make sure to frequently take breaks and reposition yourself to avoid such an issue. You also may want to wear the support compression sleeves on your wrist and or elbow, to help provide extra support.......better safe than sorry.

I find despite the heart willing, the body simply can't leap tall buildings in a single bound or stop speeding locomotives like it once did......:mocking: and man does it hurt more as you get older.......:dunno:
 
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