Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Getting close to switching over to winter fuel additive on my 1023e. Is it ok to start using winter additive before freezing temps occur?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
929 Posts
Getting close to switching over to winter fuel additive on my 1023e. Is it ok to start using winter additive before freezing temps occur?
I use the winter additive year 'round, as was suggested by my dealer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,448 Posts
Getting close to switching over to winter fuel additive on my 1023e. Is it ok to start using winter additive before freezing temps occur?
It won't hurt anything. Some have properties to help lube the fuel pump and clean the injectors so not only will it not hurt, but it will do some good.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,624 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,682 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,448 Posts
As others have stated, you can use the winter blend all year round. The only difference between the summer and winter is the winter formula includes some additional anti-gelling agents which have no ill effects in warm weather. Otherwise they are identical. I've been running the winter formula year round for 5 years.

The link below explains the differences.

https://jdparts.deere.com/partsmkt/document/english/pmac/5496_fb_SummerWinterDieselConditioner.htm
For additives yes but what you mentioned above could be read that you might be talking about the fuel. At least I read it that way the first time.

There is a difference between the summer and winter fuel. Some truckers go through great lengths to heat fuel lines and fuel filters to prevent gelling so that they can run summer blend in cold weather. There is a gas station that I used to get fuel at when I had a diesel car that would sell I think it was 5 different types (blends) of diesel. Back in the day they would call it #1 and #2 diesel. Their pumps are still marked like that the reason for the 5 types was as follows

#1 100%
#1 75% #2 25% blend
#1 50% #2 50% blend
#1 25% #2 75% blend
#2 100%

They have two tanks one for #1 and one for #2 and the pump does the blending. This is a station that caters to the truckers. As you get to smaller gas stations that are just for the people that don't know the difference they would just have one fuel pump for diesel and they will post a chart showing dates and what temp rating the fuel was good for as the average temps dip colder and colder the rating also adjusted.

The reasoning behind why truckers like #2 year round are two fold. #2 is normally cheaper to make and therefore a little less expensive at the pump. They go through a lot of fuel. But that is only part of the story.

#1 diesel which is kerosene has less energy or BTUs per gallon. #1 is about 135,000 BTU per gallon vs. 139,000 BTU for a gallon for #2. Less energy means less power and less power means less MPG further impacting the wallet of the trucker.

The combination of these two are why they would rather spend some money on modifications (or sometimes they are factory options) to run a heated fuel system so they don't get stranded when running #2 in the winter.

I used to have a Diesel for a daily driver and I would see a dip in my MPG numbers in the winter when running blended fuels. I didn't dare do without them and additives though as we see temps down to -30F. Not for a real extended period but it happens. Without #1 fuel we would have issues at temps much warmer than that.

In the end on a small engine on a tractor, you probably won't notice much difference between #1, #2 or a blend. If you really tracked number of hours per tank, there is probably a slight difference. I doubt many people watch it that close though.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,682 Posts
For additives yes but what you mentioned above could be read that you might be talking about the fuel. At least I read it that way the first time.
Sorry - I was addressing the differences between the JD Summer and Winter blend diesel fuel protect product as that is what the OP was asking about.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,448 Posts
Sorry - I was addressing the differences between the JD Summer and Winter blend diesel fuel protect product as that is what the OP was asking about.
Yeah after rereading your post I caught on to that but I just wanted to clarify that I agree with the aftermarket (or JD branded) additives, but there is some difference with the fuel so I posted the information on that for general education on Diesel for someone that is new to this type of fuel.

Understanding the difference in the fuel might help someone decide when it comes to decisions around storage of large volumes of fuel. More so as most of us likely go through a lot less fuel in the winter months when you are not mowing every week. A tractor will not detect summer fuel in the winter and just stop. Provided you account for that with the proper additives and/or modifications to the fuel system. Also that there are people that run summer (#2) year round for a reason.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,098 Posts
Personally, I run the same diesel fuel treatment year around. Why?

- You are always in the habit of treating the fuel which means all the fuel in my storage barn is suited for +120f or -30f.

- A good additive adds important lubrication qualities to the fuel which were stripped away with the MANDATE of ULSD (Ultra Low Sulfar Diesel fuel).

- Quality diesel fuel treatments increase the cetane level in the diesel, which means more power and less fuel consumption to produce the same amount of power output.

- The specific additive to protect against filter freeze REQUIRE they be used and blended with fuel at above freezing temps. Its on nearly every website of a reputable product I have read.

- Ironically, the lower the protection point level against winter filter freeze and gelling (etc), the closer to freezing the product itself, in its un-blended state, will itself freeze. Perhaps some chemist can explain why, but the products which provide the lowest filter freeze protection points freeze at near 32 Fahrenheit on their own when not blended.

One other very important point which Sennister pointed out. There is an important distinction between "Winter Fuel Blends" and "Winter treated Fuels". Winter fuel blends are mixtures of number 1 diesel and kerosene to lower the filter flow point. Winter treated fuels are additives added to diesel fuel by distributors to help make their diesel fuel product suited to the climate in which it is sold.

Personally, I believe in treating all diesel fuel with a high quality product which is designed for meeting the needs of your fuel use. I happen to like two brands that I use all of the time. Howe's fuel treatment and also "Hot Shot" fuel additives.

I use this product year around......

I add this product or this product (I alternate, no specific order.....) to every 3rd 6 gallon fuel jug and I have them numbered and use the fuel in numerical order so I know that e very 12 hours, I am running a tank full of special cleaners through the tractor. It cuts down on smoke and makes the machine run smoother and also it improves the fuel efficiency.

The debate about brands of fuel treatment is like that of motor oils. everyone has a preference for some reason and most are very loyal and real differences of opinion can exist. :laugh::lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
228 Posts
Diesel fuel additives

I'm diesel fuel ignorant.

And diesel fuel additive ignorant

I'm seeking education . If I'm using JD fuel protect summer and winter products . Is it harmful to add winter formula when summer formula is still in the fuel ? And vice versa ?

Is it OK to have just summer formula all year long?

Is it OK to have winter formula all year long ?

Here in southern Kentucky it can easily be in the twenties for a week then be in the seventies for several days
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,485 Posts
I run the JD winter formula year round with no ill effects. Several other members have stated they do the same. I don't believe running the summer formula year round would offer any cold weather protection.
 
  • Like
Reactions: PJR832 and glc

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,579 Posts
I also run an additive year round! As posted, there are many good products to choose from.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
I have used additive year round, since the 1st tank of fuel. Summer in the summer, and winter formula in the winter time. The amount of winter that you put in the fuel is much more than what you put in of the summer formula.

Kevin.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top