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Gonna be building a paddock for some goats soon, but I've never had to use t posts and hogwire fencing before. Any pointers?
 

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Get yourself a fence post driver. I've seen waaaayyyy to many guys decide they'll be the tough guy and beat them in with 3 lb sledge hammers and after 30 posts they all end up giving up on it. You're also going to need to figure out how you are going to support your corners.

And for goats, you want you panels/fencing to be 4" (or less!) square mesh. Stoopid goats will get their heads stuck in pretty much anything.
 

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Easy to put in, easy to take out. I put them in by hand till the foot plate just disappears. Take them out with a chain wrapped around them and Ken's Bolt-On hooks on the bucket. If they're really in deep or tight use the three point for removal.
 

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I've used T-posts with 3-4 strands of electric wire a lot - not sure what hog wire is.....

My only recommendation is to not get the cheapest flimsy T-posts - they will cause you more aggravation than the cost savings are worth. Buy the heavier posts.

Also agree with JimR on the post driver unless you are going to be installing 10 posts or less. Again the aggravation factor at work.......
 

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I like to cement in the corner posts as well as the gate posts. It adds quite a bit of rigidity to the paddock. Also, I second the purchase of a post pounder.

If you want all of your posts set to a uniform height, cut a chunk of scrap 2x4 to the same length as how much of the post you want above ground. This is your template to mark all of your posts with a sharpie so you know when to stop pounding. When you are done, screw some open ended eye-hooks into the 2x4 to make a fence fabric stretcher. Use a come-along with your tractor as an anchor to hold the fence fabric taunt while you attach it to the posts.

If I learned anything from trying to raise goats (switched to sheep after a year) is that they will eat nearly anything and are capable of escaping/climbing anything. Electrify the top and bottom of the fence and you shouldn't have as many issues.

Good luck!
 

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Get yourself a fence post driver. I've seen waaaayyyy to many guys decide they'll be the tough guy and beat them in with 3 lb sledge hammers and after 30 posts they all end up giving up on it. You're also going to need to figure out how you are going to support your corners.

And for goats, you want you panels/fencing to be 4" (or less!) square mesh. Stoopid goats will get their heads stuck in pretty much anything.
I don't have any goats, but my neighbor just across the road from me has them. You are soooo right on those goats getting their heads stuck in just about anything. Can't tell you how many times I've seen a goat with his head stuck in the fence & struggling to get free, & I've gone over to get them out of the fence. Then I would go back to my house, take a look across the road & the same dumb ass goat will be stuck in the fence again. These goats are fun to watch, and play with, but boy they sure don't learn much.

:munch:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I've used T-posts with 3-4 strands of electric wire a lot - not sure what hog wire is.....
from my understanding, any wire based panel fence like cow fence or any other welded wire fence is "hogwire fence"

My only recommendation is to not get the cheapest flimsy T-posts - they will cause you more aggravation than the cost savings are worth. Buy the heavier posts.
looking on tractor supply's website.. It's hard to tell which is which, and what length to get. If I'm doing 4 foot tall fencing, do I want 6 foot posts, to be able to have two feet under ground? Do I need to cement the corner posts?

Also agree with JimR on the post driver unless you are going to be installing 10 posts or less. Again the aggravation factor at work.......
yeah, looking at doing an 80x80 foot area, I'm estimating 36 uprights, and then angle braces for corners.

Oh yeah, what do you do for making a gate for t post fence??
 

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I like to cement in the corner posts as well as the gate posts. It adds quite a bit of rigidity to the paddock. Also, I second the purchase of a post pounder.

If you want all of your posts set to a uniform height, cut a chunk of scrap 2x4 to the same length as how much of the post you want above ground. This is your template to mark all of your posts with a sharpie so you know when to stop pounding. When you are done, screw some open ended eye-hooks into the 2x4 to make a fence fabric stretcher. Use a come-along with your tractor as an anchor to hold the fence fabric taunt while you attach it to the posts.

If I learned anything from trying to raise goats (switched to sheep after a year) is that they will eat nearly anything and are capable of escaping/climbing anything. Electrify the top and bottom of the fence and you shouldn't have as many issues.

Good luck!
Agree 100% about putting in the fence. Goats, yep, eat everything, everything gets a nibble. They will eat tree bark, seats on mowers and tractors, and jump onto everything.
 

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My neighbor had goats,,,
he said, the most important part of the fence is the ladder.
Lean two ladders against the fence for them to go over, so they will not tear the fence down!! :bigthumb:

:laugh:
 

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looking on tractor supply's website.. It's hard to tell which is which, and what length to get. If I'm doing 4 foot tall fencing, do I want 6 foot posts, to be able to have two feet under ground? Do I need to cement the corner posts?
The only way to really tell about the different posts is to go to Tractor Supply and pick up the different posts. The difference will imidiately be apparent. The cheaper thin posts I could probably bend over my knee.

As far as depth is concerned that depends. When I use electric multiple single strand wire 2' depth was plenty as the livestock wouldn't be pushing against the wire. It you need any stability a 3' depth might be better but also mich more difficult depending on how many rocks you might find at deeper depths.

For the corners and gate posts I am a fan of taking the extra effort and expense and sinking 4x4 treated posts in the ground. 90% of the pressure from a fence is at the corners and termination points (gate). Also if you are using a stretcher you will need that stability on the corners/ends to get your wire as tight as possible.

Take your time and do it right the first time. There is nothing like coming home from the tavern on a Friday night to 6 150# pigs running wild in the driveway.......
 

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Dad and I built 3/8 to 1/2 mile of temporary fence for hog pastures every spring, which is what you are building for goats. As soon as the frost was out of the ground in spring and ground was getting solid we'd take the old fence down and move it to the next pasture. We'd take the wire off the posts and roll it up in 40 rod rolls. Then pull the posts with the loader.

We'd set the rolls of 42 inch tall woven wire hog fence where the fence would start, then roll it out. We'd use an existing post as an end post or set a new one. We'd put one angle brace on the end posts. Drive-thru gates could pivot on a wood post, never a steel post except for a one use situation. Once one end was tied off solid we could tension the wire. On 440 feet of fence a 5000# tractor was about the right size, low gear at idle till the engine stalls then lock the brakes down. Then we'd tie the last end to the end post. Then walk down the fence and set a steel post about every 15-16 feet and tie the wire to them.

We never set posts in concrete, some of the old hedge posts we used were hard enough to pull the way it was. A 4x4 is NOT a fence post, but for goats may be O-K. We used big hedge posts for end posts, maybe 10" in diameter in places, and 6-7" wood posts other places about 7-8 ft long. Steel posts were all 7 ft long hot rolled "t" posts and we'd set them so the flag was 6 inches below the ground. We'd adjust the path of the woven wire to avoid dips in the fence. Low spots were tough to get and keep the wire down in the low spots. Fence wire was also available in 36 inch height which was too low. Line fences were made from 48" or taller wire. Line fence used all new materials, fence wire, a barb wire on top, 2-3 new steel posts then a new wood post, distance between posts was measured, not eyeballed. The old wire was rolled up and scrapped in most cases. The last 6-8 years Dad farmed he took out about two miles of fence and only replaced a quarter mile. What had been four 20 acre and two 40 acre fields was eventually an 80 and two 40's. The days of having hogs & cattle out in the fields was over, fences just took up space of 2-3 rows of corn or beans.
 

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from my understanding, any wire based panel fence like cow fence or any other welded wire fence is "hogwire fence"

looking on tractor supply's website.. It's hard to tell which is which, and what length to get. If I'm doing 4 foot tall fencing, do I want 6 foot posts, to be able to have two feet under ground? Do I need to cement the corner posts?

yeah, looking at doing an 80x80 foot area, I'm estimating 36 uprights, and then angle braces for corners.

Oh yeah, what do you do for making a gate for t post fence??
I use 6 1/2 foot T posts from tractor supply. I pound them in 2 feet, and leave 4 1/2 feet sticking out. I have put in 1000's of feet of fence like that. I actually like used, older T posts better, they are heavier. The ones at tractor supply are the lighter ones, but that's all I ever see locally.
They are about 5 bucks each at TS, but used ones go for about 1.50 at auction. Most used ones are 6 feet, but that's fine, I pound them in a foot and a half.
TS sells aluminum angle brackets that work pretty well for corners and gates. I used them for temporary fences, and they have been up for 5 years.
Here is what they look like:

775.jpg


This is what I do now. I put in 3000 feet of this Last fall.

811.jpg 809.jpg 763.jpg
 

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I use 6 1/2 foot T posts from tractor supply. I pound them in 2 feet, and leave 4 1/2 feet sticking out. I have put in 1000's of feet of fence like that. I actually like used, older T posts better, they are heavier. The ones at tractor supply are the lighter ones, but that's all I ever see locally.
They are about 5 bucks each at TS, but used ones go for about 1.50 at auction. Most used ones are 6 feet, but that's fine, I pound them in a foot and a half.
TS sells aluminum angle brackets that work pretty well for corners and gates. I used them for temporary fences, and they have been up for 5 years.
Here is what they look like:


This is what I do now. I put in 3000 feet of this Last fall.

View attachment 49455 View attachment 49456 View attachment 49457
That's a good looking fence and the rest of the place looks great too! We've got to put in about the same amount of fence in the next few months and will use a combination of wood posts and t posts. Wood for the corners and every 30 ft in the line with T posts between. At least part of it will be barbed wire as it will be in the trees and keeping stuff off the electric fence is problematic.

Treefarmer
 

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I used this for my corners and braces..

Wedge-Loc Corner/InLine Brace Set | TractorSupply

It is available at TSC.

A bit pricey, but I was doing a small area and needed something fast and easy. My fence was just for dogs. Not that mine are any smarter that goats at times...:laugh:
 

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When I first moved down here to SC.I was going to get me one or two goats as pets. The kind that run around & fall over & go to sleep, or one of those real small ones. But after seeing how stubborn they can be to handle & what they can do to fencing, the cost, the work, & vet bills???, I've changed my mind. Every now & then I cross the road to my neighbor & pet the dumb things while I get their heads unstuck from the fencing.

:laugh::laugh::laugh::lolol:
 

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When I first moved down here to SC.I was going to get me one or two goats as pets. The kind that run around & fall over & go to sleep, or one of those real small ones. But after seeing how stubborn they can be to handle & what they can do to fencing, the cost, the work, & vet bills???, I've changed my mind. Every now & then I cross the road to my neighbor & pet the dumb things while I get their heads unstuck from the fencing.

:laugh::laugh::laugh::lolol:
Yep, goats are great . . . . . as long as someone else owns them. :laugh::laugh:

Been there, done that! . . . . got the damage to prove it!
 

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These goats are fun to watch, and play with, but boy they sure don't learn much.

:munch:
A goat can learn to do anything in about three days if there's food involved. They are stubborn, but they certainly are not dumb. I have one that knows how to open a sure-latch gate.

I use 6" wood posts and build proper H braces for all corners and gates. I plant them as deep as I can, I try to get at least 32" in the ground but sometimes it's not possible due to rocks. Some are pounded in, but most are augered and tamped. For straight runs between braces I use 6' T posts, 2' in the ground, spaced 10' apart. In soft ground I can push them in with the loader, but I have also used a Shaver 3 point hydraulic post driver. If the goats have horns you should use the 4" square woven wire that's made specifically for goats. The standard 6" field fence is cheaper, but horned goats will put their heads through and get stuck.

Redbrand has some good instructional videos on fence building.
 
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