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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I needed to repair the wobbled out axle holes in my JD Rotary Cutter's tail wheel yoke for while. If I knew how easy it was to fix I would have done it sooner.

First I ordered a JD bushing and axle bolt kit. Then I ground off the washer that Deere uses to hold the yoke on and removed the yoke from the Rotary Cutter.

I drilled out the wobbled-out holes in the yokes arms to 3/4" for two 3/4" bolts I was using to make shoulder bushings for the yoke.

I ordered a 11.80 MM drill bit from MSC to drill holes through the new 3/4" bolts/bushings for the new 11.75 MM axle bolt.

I had to order another 11.75 MM axle bolt from JD and weld the both of them together because the heads of the 3/4 " bolts/ bushings made the width of the yoke wider.

Lucky for me I had a round on the shelf with a hole in it the exact size as the yoke's shaft. I just welded it on and I was done..

The tail wheel tracks better now than when the rotary cutter was brand new. Now the tail wheel starts tracking as soon as the tractors tires start moving, no delay or hanging up whatsoever.

Even when new when I backed up the tail wheel hesitated a bit before it would finally flip around, even after greasing. When I welded on the thicker round I took away some extra length from the yoke's shaft, I think the extra length gave a place for dirt to build up and get inside the tube... now that the shaft is shorter there is less exposed shaft to get funky and work it's way into the tube housing.
 

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That sure is a interesting looking bolt!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Kenny, when the wheel bushings wore out the center of the wheel was turning on the axle bolt.
 

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Nice Job! :thumbup1gif::thumbup1gif::thumbup1gif:
 

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So I'm readying your post, loving the pix, admiring your ability to get things done, and thinking:

"So, for those of us who can't weld, is there some annual maintenance that will put this problem off?"

You mentioned dirt getting in there. Should the tail wheel axle and pivot be torn down and cleaned each season?

Pete
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks Randy.

Pete I always grease the axle and the shaft but the wheel bushing eventually wear from going over rough spots. As far as maintenance goes, it couldn't hurt to take the wheel off when the mowing season ends , clean things up and re lube everything.

As for cleaning the yoke's shaft and tube housing ..... the yoke assembly is held in the tube housing by a thick washer that's been welded to the top of the yoke's shaft. You would need to grind off the washer to allow the yoke assembly to drop out of it's housing, then after you cleaned things up weld on a new washer .. remembering to grease the yoke's shaft only after the new welded on washer and shaft have completely cooled down. It's really not a hard job if you have the tools.

You could possibly use a spritzer bottle filled with mineral spirits to flush the old grease and grime out of the housing by turning the yoke assembly back and forth and working it up and down as much as slop in the assembly will allow.... then let it dry out for a day and grease it. :good2:
 

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So I'm readying your post, loving the pix, admiring your ability to get things done, and thinking:

"So, for those of us who can't weld, is there some annual maintenance that will put this problem off?"

You mentioned dirt getting in there. Should the tail wheel axle and pivot be torn down and cleaned each season?

Pete
It sure couldn't hurt any.. ohh and grease.. Cheap grease is better then no grease.. I try to mount a grease gun on every implement that has a grease zerk on it.. Grease grease grease... :nunu::nunu:
 
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