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Awesome craftsmanship

This popped up on my suggested videos tonight. Part of it triggers my depression, part of it warms my soul to the core.

This is poetry.

It's a great video. I'm not sure anyone in this country could do that except maybe some of the Amish families. I'm glad that someone still has those skills.

Treefarmer
 

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There's still a very small group of people teaching and practicing timber framing in the US. You're right about it being a dying art though.

If my neck and hands weren't fubar, I'd be doing it myself too. I still want to try doing some kind of log building, and I would love to timber frame at least part of my next house. If I'll be using traditional methods or not is yet to be seen since I have trouble with grasping things more than a few minutes at a time so beating a chisel isn't something that's good for me.

I like the look of post and beam, but the artisan in me has too much respect for mortise and tenon with pegs. The joinery is what makes the form. Any jackhole can bolt logs together.
 

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Great video and love the looks of your house. :bigthumb: Very few houses are built like yours . :bigthumb: Beautiful great job.:bigthumb:

Thanks for sharing.
 

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Sorry missed the part it wasn't your house... Either way they did a great job.:bigthumb:
 

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Sounds Norwegian to me. Thanks for sharing. What we do today isn't difficult despite how it may look and every modern building technique is missing the "art" from the world of old. There are untouched timber framed buildings in New England that are centuries old. I've been to and in them. I've been a builder for over 30 years but I step inside one of these buildings and I'm nobody with 0 skills. Not everyone can appreciate the pure raw craftsmanship it takes to build this. To me, it speaks to something much larger than a the sum of its parts where daily life was much more simple and meaningful. True to life happiness at its finest.
 

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This family has lots of patience and love, to spend years building their house/home. I'm almost certain this family lives in Latvis.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'll watch the video later from the comfort of my recliner.
Only 2 of my fb friends watched it. Their loss!

Grab a beer, get cozy, and enjoy.

I love watching the old ways home and barn construction videos. Balloon framing has nothing on mortise and tenon. It's not for everyone, that's for sure. Then again, I'm not fond of too many cheap and quick products of the modern age. :)
 

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Awesome vid! I have a lot of envy of the skill sets these folks have.

If I knew what they did in my 20's and early 30's (which I put most of the folks in the video), I would have loved to attempt this (if I knew what I was doing)!

Now, I see a lot of very hard work, hard excellently executed work, but exceptionally hard work nonetheless.

My "ignorance" of work scope to "ambition" ratio is different than it would have been in my earlier years. You need to know enough to be confident that you can do the job and want to do it without knowing the extent of the sacrifice, time and challenges you'll face along the way that go into an endeavor of massive scale to enthusiastically embrace the challenge. Now, even if I had the skill set, I would look at this project with apprehension of the road ahead. Oh, to be young(er)...

I focused my efforts in my earlier years honing skills best utilized behind a desk with a computer because that provided a high probability of earning a good living. Not the hands-on skills these folks have and execute so well. My head is behind my desk, but heart is with these folks.

Matt
 

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I wish I had their ambition. I had mixed feelings about this build, most of which were good; but I felt compelled to leave the following comment in the doodly-doo as AvE calls the comments section.

A well executed video of a house with impeccable craftsmanship and the builder's skill of using old time tools. However; watching the oldest girl grow significantly makes me wonder if the romance of building with old-school tools was worth it when they could have had the house done sooner using modern tools, and enjoy it longer with their children. As long as they are happy, that's all that matters.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
They built it over one winter and three summers according to another video the mother made. I don't think this took away any family time.

I'm totally with you guys in employing modern tools at various levels - first and foremost, I'd use a Horrible Freight bandmill before I hewed a single log!
 

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Depends on the situation

I wish I had their ambition. I had mixed feelings about this build, most of which were good; but I felt compelled to leave the following comment in the doodly-doo as AvE calls the comments section.

A well executed video of a house with impeccable craftsmanship and the builder's skill of using old time tools. However; watching the oldest girl grow significantly makes me wonder if the romance of building with old-school tools was worth it when they could have had the house done sooner using modern tools, and enjoy it longer with their children. As long as they are happy, that's all that matters.
I understand the comment but would have to say that it depends on the rest of the family situation. If they were living in a tent and conditions were miserable, then by all means get that sucker built as quickly as possible. However, if their living situation was ok and this was their dream house then I think the kids will have this process as a cherished memory. Family time can be lots of different things. I cherish my memories of working with my Dad and Granddad putting hay up although frankly I hated it at the time. But watching my 80 year old Granddad stacking hay and getting aggravated when we didn't throw him enough bales is something I'll always remember. As a kid, I would have been all in on a build like that although probably would have moaned and complained.

Your last line sums it up perfectly- as long as they are happy, that's all that matters.

Treefarmer
 
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