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I'm not too familiar with diesels or emissions but was reading through some posts about exhausts and it got me wondering about if my tractor should have a spark arrestor for the dry season. I see JD sells a tip for them and was curious if anyone has experience with needing one, put one on for brush hogging, or they are just to meet a weird state/federal rule if they(these tractors) were to be used on protected lands by government employees.

I know the cost of fires is huge, so I was wondering if these machines are truly a danger? I've seen smoke roll but never any sparks.
 

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So working on the Railroad for 32 yrs, some Locomotives would often set miles of fires. Usually a loco that was throwing large chunks of burning carbon for some reason? In areas prone to fires we would assign locos with turbos and that would stop the issue. Apparently the carbon would be reduced to soot by the turbo impeller's.

Believe Railroad fuel is probably a cheaper grade than the diesel we are running. However, it would be cheap insurance to install an arrestor. Idling for long periods is never a good idea.
Last year in Western NC we had massive fires. Had to wear a mask to be outside.

What makes me really nervous is operating through heavy leaves and high brush with the hot exhaust pipe so close to the ground. I was picking up leaves with a riding mower several years ago and leaves built up under the machine and caught on fire.

The whole regen cycle on the bigger diesels would give me pause for concern when the soot starts burning off during a cycle? Don't know much about it and probably JD has precautions in place? Someone know?

I am by no means an expert on this subject, but seems like a smart idea to install one. The kit for my 2305 is 26$-a no brainer.
Many states require them unless you are using the machine on a "watered lawn"?
If your tractor was bought out of state or produced for use in a state that doesn't require one and you are using it in a different state- it may be out of compliance?
Just my thoughts.
 

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There are no sparks in a diesel engine, Its uses compression...I don't know how you would ever have the exhaust start a fire...The glow plugs do not spark either they just heat up, so only something in contact with them burn, like the fuel.
 

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There are no sparks in a diesel engine, Its uses compression...I don't know how you would ever have the exhaust start a fire...The glow plugs do not spark either they just heat up, so only something in contact with them burn, like the fuel.
Not sure if joking or not but spark arrestors have nothing to so with how an internal combustion engine is fired. It stops (arrests) any sparks that may emanate from the short exhaust of vehicles. These sparks can be from buildup in mufflers etc. and other causes.


They are mandatory on many off road vehicles as many many fires have been started by exhaust sparks (embers) over the years.
 

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ATVs, dirtbikes, etc off road vehicles all have spark arrestors, if you do a lot of work in very dry brush it would probably give you some piece of mind.

Never been a thought for me since I don't live in an area with wild fires.
 

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Diesels can absolutely emit sparks. If anyone has seen an old Cat that has some buildup in the exhaust and then worked hard, you'll see plenty of sparks going up at high rates of speed. It's a cool sight, but it makes the forestry guys nervous.
 

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I'd be more worried of the high heat from regen in the over 25hp tractors...
 
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