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Discussion Starter #1
I really hadn't considered this. I wonder how quickly an experienced semi driver could adapt to one pedal driving (for "routine" stops), after so many years with three pedals? What about switching back & forth between the Tesla and traditional trucks?

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I thought they were going to drive themselves...
 
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Discussion Starter #3
I thought they were going to drive themselves...
Good point, or good joke - whichever!

I think the semi's self driving plans start with getting approval for interstate long-haul (only) initially. A self driving mistake for a large heavy vehicle could do a lot of damage!
 

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I think I could easily adapt to one pedal driving, it's probably easier than switching between the semi I drive now and my stick shift car because of the different clutch and transmission styles.
 

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A good number of the Class 7 & 8 trucks on the roads today are running automatic transmissions. I recently heard that you can no longer purchase a manual transmission HD truck from Mack. They're now all automatics.
 

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A good number of the Class 7 & 8 trucks on the roads today are running automatic transmissions. I recently heard that you can no longer purchase a manual transmission HD truck from Mack. They're now all automatics.
That's too bad. The last place I drove for had automatics, I drove one for a year, it was a new 2017 Peterbilt. It was by far the best heavy truck automatic transmission that I have driven but I still much prefer a manual.

It's a lot harder to learn to drive semi with a manual but I feel like learning how to do things up-shift and down- shift while making a turn in traffic teaches a driver how to stay cool and to pay attention to multiple things at once. It's embarrassing to have to come to a complete stop because you lost track of what gear you were in and have to start over lol.

The autos I've driven weren't good for things like loading a hopper bottom out of an overhead hopper or anything where you need to make small movements, they are really jerky, the clutch seems more like an on and off switch. With the electric trucks I don't think that will be a problem though.
 

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I recently heard that you can no longer purchase a manual transmission HD truck from Mack. They're now all automatics.
That is just wrong on so many levels.

Mack ain't Mack no more.

It's a lot harder to learn to drive semi with a manual but I feel like learning how to do things up-shift and down- shift while making a turn in traffic teaches a driver how to stay cool and to pay attention to multiple things at once. It's embarrassing to have to come to a complete stop because you lost track of what gear you were in and have to start over lol.
Very true statement Trav. Agree 100%.

I had a good laugh reading the last sentence. I can tell you that missing a gear in a Quadraplex really sucks as you cost to a stop on the shoulder............. and every driver on the radio is bustin' yer you know what's.

Dad called the new breed "steering wheel holders" cause that is about all they do and only from point a to point b and then back to point a and then back to.... Yeach, talk about boring.


Every time I read a post like this I thank God for a Father that would whip my butt when needed and a Dad that took the time to teach me stuff.



One pedal electric semi.
Pepsi
Figures.
 

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Good point, or good joke - whichever!

I think the semi's self driving plans start with getting approval for interstate long-haul (only) initially. A self driving mistake for a large heavy vehicle could do a lot of damage!
A little of both. I think it will be interesting to see how electric works in that use case. You would think the local shorter haul scenario is better for an electric platform. We really don't know what kind of range they will be looking at on OTR. It isn't like they can pull in and charge themselves but I am sure they can just set up their own stations kind of like a truck stop where they pull in and an attendant plugs them in. I do get that for now they still have a driver in the cab but that is if/when they get to a point of full self driving.

It will be interesting to see also how they do performance wise. I know that OTR truckers have to maintain log books and only can drive for a certain number of hours then have to take mandatory rest stops. I don't work in that field so I don't know what the limits are. However, a self driving truck may get around that keeping it moving though you would still have down time for charging. So over say a 24hr period is it a wash? Also it is pretty easy to have a vehicle use cameras and GPS to follow the roads on a clear day. I wonder how well it will do say on a snow covered road?
 
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The real question is how long will it take to charge it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Here's an interesting clip describing the economics of the Tesla semi.
A companion article states: "The Semi also stands to benefit from Tesla’s work with its Full Self-Driving suite, whose inner-city driving features are currently being rolled out to its initial batch of testers."


This article linked below predicts 400 miles of range from a 30 minute charge once the new megachargers are deployed. (Maybe not for another year or more...)

 

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once the new megachargers are deployed
.........and then we find out how weak the grid is.

Then there is the price of "fuel" being off-peak rates vs. peak rates per Kw.
 

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That's too bad. The last place I drove for had automatics, I drove one for a year, it was a new 2017 Peterbilt. It was by far the best heavy truck automatic transmission that I have driven but I still much prefer a manual.

It's a lot harder to learn to drive semi with a manual but I feel like learning how to do things up-shift and down- shift while making a turn in traffic teaches a driver how to stay cool and to pay attention to multiple things at once. It's embarrassing to have to come to a complete stop because you lost track of what gear you were in and have to start over lol.

The autos I've driven weren't good for things like loading a hopper bottom out of an overhead hopper or anything where you need to make small movements, they are really jerky, the clutch seems more like an on and off switch. With the electric trucks I don't think that will be a problem though.
They are interesting when hauling fluid loads also. Milk trailers don’t have any baffles in them unless it happens to be an old 2 compartment trailer. The last auto shift I drove eventually learned how to handle the slosh. Just not as well as a good driver with 3 pedals. I also prefer 3 pedals
 

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They are interesting when hauling fluid loads also. Milk trailers don’t have any baffles in them unless it happens to be an old 2 compartment trailer. The last auto shift I drove eventually learned how to handle the slosh. Just not as well as a good driver with 3 pedals. I also prefer 3 pedals
I used to be a milk hauler, farm pick up, no baffles in my trailer so I know what you're talking about. Nothing like having someone kicking the back of your seat all day lol.
 

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The real question is how long will it take to charge it.
That really depends. It takes a lot longer to charge a battery in a Tesla or other EV for that matter to 100% for max range than it does to say charge it to just 70-80% which is all you probably need to get from charge point to charge point. That last 20% or so the chargers have to really slow down. At that point if you have the range to hit the next spot, get in and go. While going to 100% might mean you can skip a charger or two on a long trip, it will take a lot longer sitting to get up to that 100% than just stopping a couple more times. Not only that, but it is harder on the battery pack. I am sure they will space the charge stations with this in mind based on range they are getting with a fully loaded trailer.
 

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I used to be a milk hauler, farm pick up, no baffles in my trailer so I know what you're talking about. Nothing like having someone kicking the back of your seat all day lol.
So I assume it is so you still unload milk at your destination and not butter? I can imagine it would be hard to unload a milk tanker that is full of butter.
 

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So I assume it is so you still unload milk at your destination.
Has to do with the ability to clean the tank. Baffles make it impossible to clean.
 
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