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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So i've always wanted a stone wall along the northeast side of the house. Leftover money was non existent when we built the house. So I tried for 15 years to grow some grass on the slope but it always just dries up and dies and turns to crab grass. I finally decided if i just cut the bank back, it will motivate me to start the Great Wall. :lol:
Plus my FIL needs to get a bucket truck back to corner of back yard this winter to take down a few dead/dying oaks.
The bank cut will also include drainage pipe and stone under wall to keep side yard dryer in winter.
Usure as to wether it will be natural stone or manufactured block as this juncture.
Thank goodness for the KBOH diff lock pedal and the Piranha tooth bar. They got a workout today.

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Factor out the trees and that's a very similar situation at a friend's place. He built his wall from manufactured block and he did a nice job, especially since he's 9-years older than me and dones't have a tractor. I think his wall is somewhere between 100' - 150' long by about 3' high.

Whatever route you go, make there is a drain pipe back there to relieve water pressure on your wall.
 

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Looking good! Is your soil naturally stratified like that, or are you getting into fill that was brought in during house construction? Personally, I wouldn't worry about finishing the wall too soon. That dirt bank should be just fine for a couple years. :lol:
 

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Factor out the trees and that's a very similar situation at a friend's place. He built his wall from manufactured block and he did a nice job, especially since he's 9-years older than me and dones't have a tractor. I think his wall is somewhere between 100' - 150' long by about 3' high.

Whatever route you go, make there is a drain pipe back there to relieve water pressure on your wall.
I'm not an expert on this, but that's never stopped me from jumping in before... :laugh: There was a thread about building retaining walls on another forum that I get on to from time to time. One of the posters linked to a Youtube video done by a guy that does retaining walls for a living. He was talking about the most common mistakes that were made. mjncad is right - you definitely want drainage behind the wall. But this guy was adamant that you don't want to do what most people do - and that is to put pea-gravel in behind the wall. You want crushed stone that will pack and lock into itself and not wash out. Pea gravel won't lock and will wash out between the cracks in the retaining wall. Eventually you have nothing but dirt back there and then it will start caving in behind the wall or plug up and the wall becomes a dam and blows out. The crushed rock eliminates this issue.

I'll try to get back on the other board to find the thread and the video. It might be later this week though - kind of tied up today and tomorrow.

Nice work with the FEL, by the way. Looks like you had someone professionally excavate that bank!! :good2:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Nice job. Looks like sandy soil?

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Yeah, my house is on a gravel hill. When we researched deed there were mining permits from early 1900’s. There is a very small overgrown pit not far from house.
Has a layer of clay then all bank run gravel. Which is coarse sand, fine sand, stones, etc.
A bit wet right now.

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I'm not an expert on this, but that's never stopped me from jumping in before... :laugh: There was a thread about building retaining walls on another forum that I get on to from time to time. One of the posters linked to a Youtube video done by a guy that does retaining walls for a living. He was talking about the most common mistakes that were made. mjncad is right - you definitely want drainage behind the wall. But this guy was adamant that you don't want to do what most people do - and that is to put pea-gravel in behind the wall. You want crushed stone that will pack and lock into itself and not wash out. Pea gravel won't lock and will wash out between the cracks in the retaining wall. Eventually you have nothing but dirt back there and then it will start caving in behind the wall or plug up and the wall becomes a dam and blows out. The crushed rock eliminates this issue.

I'll try to get back on the other board to find the thread and the video. It might be later this week though - kind of tied up today and tomorrow.

Nice work with the FEL, by the way. Looks like you had someone professionally excavate that bank!! :good2:
As I recall, Pavestone has plenty of instructions on their website concerning the construction of just about people will build with their products.

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I'm not an expert on this, but that's never stopped me from jumping in before... :laugh: There was a thread about building retaining walls on another forum that I get on to from time to time. One of the posters linked to a Youtube video done by a guy that does retaining walls for a living. He was talking about the most common mistakes that were made. mjncad is right - you definitely want drainage behind the wall. But this guy was adamant that you don't want to do what most people do - and that is to put pea-gravel in behind the wall. You want crushed stone that will pack and lock into itself and not wash out. Pea gravel won't lock and will wash out between the cracks in the retaining wall. Eventually you have nothing but dirt back there and then it will start caving in behind the wall or plug up and the wall becomes a dam and blows out. The crushed rock eliminates this issue.

I'll try to get back on the other board to find the thread and the video. It might be later this week though - kind of tied up today and tomorrow.

Nice work with the FEL, by the way. Looks like you had someone professionally excavate that bank!! :good2:


Pea stone gravel only belongs on maybe 12" of the pipe so as not to damage the sleeve. Besides that, you would typically use washed stone/crushed stone. I've built multiple walls either way, and the secret is to use geogrid fabric and make sure the water drains away ASAP.
 

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Nice project you taken on. I’ve done residential and commercial walls for about 15 years. Worked on walls from 6”-12’+ Tall , tiered and all. Depending on the products you choose to use precast vs natural stone you can choose different construction methods. Using a natural stone you can get away with certain drainage techniques. Using larger natural stone will demand more of your tractor where large precast wall bricks will demand more from you.

With precast you should ensure proper drainage as others mentioned, hydrostatic pressure from water stuck behind the wall can make a mess of your hard work. Natural stone is more forgiving yet still attractive and natural looking. Attached is a typical construction, a geotextile landscape fabric is recommended to separate the gravel and backfill soil. Also added a few photos from jobs I have done I had on my phone.
 

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We wanted a Jump on Winter and poured the footings for my Daughters New Shop

It was a tough start winter was coming on and we needed the footings done or nothing would get done on her shop till winter ended. They had to cover the forms and heat the ground to pour these but it got done and her building was started at the beginning of winter! Shop3.png Got it pretty much done and poured the floor last! shop.jpg We were so glad it was finished not sure why it could not have been done in nicer weather?
 
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