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Move my bee hives. I had placed my bee hives in a couple of places that were mostly in the shade. Several older local beekeepers advised me the bees did better in full sun. So I figured out a way to move the hives to a couple of spots where they'll be in the sun from just a few minutes after sunrise until just a few minutes before sunset for the most part of the year.

Keep in mind there are approximately 30,000 bees in each of these hives. I moved the first hive about 10 p.m. and the second around 5 a.m. the next morning. here's the photos.
 

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Seems like I read ,along time ago, that ,sometimes,moving a hive,even a little bit,can disorient the bees to where they cant find home again. Am I dreaming this up or ? Are the bees much trouble ? Do you get much honey out of a box? Just curious....be interesting to do,I think. Thanks for the post!
 

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Even though you did that chore at night, I'll bet you wished you had a cabbed tractor! I know I would have.
 

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Cool Project

So Wayne, what do you estimate the weight of one of those boxes?
 

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Seems like I read ,along time ago, that ,sometimes,moving a hive,even a little bit,can disorient the bees to where they cant find home again.
That's exactly right. Unless you move them a few feet a day, or several miles and then back, it messes their "GPS" up. The oldtimers say to place a branch or something to obstruct their exit and it will make them reset their "GPS" to their new location. There are a few who will still fly back to the old location. TO help them I set a spare box there with some empty honey foundation to allow them to figure out something has changed. The first day several dozen went back but the number has gotten fewer each day, almost each hour. There were hardly any left yesterday evening. On the fourth day, I'll carry the spare box with whatever bees are left to the new location and combine it by placing it on top.
 

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So Wayne, what do you estimate the weight of one of those boxes?
The bottom two, which are where the bees "live" will weigh approximately 100 pounds each now. The top box is only about 5 pounds since I've robbed the honey. The bees store their winter food in the bottom two boxes as well as raise new bees and the bottom box is where the queen lays eggs. The middle box stores are also used to feed the developing bees being raised in the bottom box.
Locally here in North Alabama, the local beekeepers say you need about 80 to 100 pounds of honey at the end of October for the bees to use during a normal winter. I believe mine have that.
 

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Are the bees much trouble ? Do you get much honey out of a box? Just curious....be interesting to do,I think. Thanks for the post!
With my two hives, not so much. I usually check them every couple of weeks during the spring and through October. After October you have to be careful because they generate their own heat and to keep their brood alive maintain around 94 degrees inside the hive. You're not doing them any favor to remove the top and lose that heat.

Out of 3 honey supers, the top box, I harvested 44 pounds of honey. It is very rewarding to taste honey produced in your own hive. Only been stung 5 times this year.
 

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Even though you did that chore at night, I'll bet you wished you had a cabbed tractor! I know I would have.
Yeah, it was a little nerve wracking. I took it very, very easy so the hive wouldn't swing back and forth. A friend told me that using a tractor was cheating, that you're supposed to grunt, sweat and swear when you move a hive. Well, using a tractor didn't prevent any of those from happening anyway :laugh:
 

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Wow. Thats is pretty cool. I can see that a hive on a pallet, a cabbed tractor, and forks would be a treat!

I have a bee hive in the top rafters of my deer blind. Mind you this is a fully finished and carpeted blind with nice home windows in it. I have to come up with a way to remove them but o do not haves access to the roof. Any ideas? I have enough room to get my hand in.

Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Tapatalk
 

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Wow. Thats is pretty cool. I can see that a hive on a pallet, a cabbed tractor, and forks would be a treat!

I have a bee hive in the top rafters of my deer blind. Mind you this is a fully finished and carpeted blind with nice home windows in it. I have to come up with a way to remove them but o do not haves access to the roof. Any ideas? I have enough room to get my hand in.

Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Tapatalk
Do a you tube search for "honey bee trap out" or something similar. Several good methods for removing unwanted bees. If you know a local beekeeper, most will be glad to take / help get the bees out of your deer stand.
 

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Wow. Thats is pretty cool. I can see that a hive on a pallet, a cabbed tractor, and forks would be a treat!
The new stands I built for the new location are made so that in the future I can use forks to lift the stands, hives and all for moving. Still working on the cab for the tractor part. About the only regret I have of my purchase: not getting a cab.
 

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Interesting project, thanks for sharing the pics. I would love to have a hive or two but am afraid the bears we have around would destroy them. My neighbor gave up on his hives after a couple of bear invasions.
 
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