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Most everyone with a loader has probably had the problem... you disconnect your loader and then later on you cannot get it connected because pressure has built up in the lines. Most folks just press in on the coupler tip to vent off some fluid and off you go.

I noticed that newer Kubotas have reversed gender hydraulic connections for the loader. Meaning, they have the male fittings on the tractor and the ends of the hoses have female couplers. I started thinking maybe that system was better and less likely to leak when disconnected.

Then today I was watching a video of a guy with a Kubota trying to reattach his loader after being stored for winter and he couldn't get the couplers attached. He was able to easily relieve pressure on the tractor side by moving the joystick. But... with female couplers on the loader side there was no tip to press and the only solution was to loosen the couplers and vent some pressure. No pressing the tip against something and no fancy tool that works.

I'm glad JD kept the female couplers on the tractor side.
 

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Most everyone with a loader has probably had the problem... you disconnect your loader and then later on you cannot get it connected because pressure has built up in the lines. Most folks just press in on the coupler tip to vent off some fluid and off you go.

I noticed that newer Kubotas have reversed gender hydraulic connections for the loader. Meaning, they have the male fittings on the tractor and the ends of the hoses have female couplers. I started thinking maybe that system was better and less likely to leak when disconnected.

Then today I was watching a video of a guy with a Kubota trying to reattach his loader after being stored for winter and he couldn't get the couplers attached. He was able to easily relieve pressure on the tractor side by moving the joystick. But... with female couplers on the loader side there was no tip to press and the only solution was to loosen the couplers and vent some pressure. No pressing the tip against something and no fancy tool that works.

I'm glad JD kept the female couplers on the tractor side.
So you saying it pays to go Green :bigthumb:
 

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Most everyone with a loader has probably had the problem... you disconnect your loader and then later on you cannot get it connected because pressure has built up in the lines. Most folks just press in on the coupler tip to vent off some fluid and off you go.

I noticed that newer Kubotas have reversed gender hydraulic connections for the loader. Meaning, they have the male fittings on the tractor and the ends of the hoses have female couplers. I started thinking maybe that system was better and less likely to leak when disconnected.

Then today I was watching a video of a guy with a Kubota trying to reattach his loader after being stored for winter and he couldn't get the couplers attached. He was able to easily relieve pressure on the tractor side by moving the joystick. But... with female couplers on the loader side there was no tip to press and the only solution was to loosen the couplers and vent some pressure. No pressing the tip against something and no fancy tool that works.

I'm glad JD kept the female couplers on the tractor side.
What would be Kubota's logic for reversing the fittings? Could it be to prevent dirt and debris from getting in the female couplers which have historically been left on the tractor to be subject to tough conditions by having the male connections on the tractor instead, which would be easier to clean?

Also, did you know the fittings were reversed before the guy had trouble or did you notice it while he was trying to resolve the problem? Just wondered if that was the reason you were watching the video (that the fittings were reversed)......
 

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What would be Kubota's logic for reversing the fittings? Could it be to prevent dirt and debris from getting in the female couplers which have historically been left on the tractor to be subject to tough conditions by having the male connections on the tractor instead, which would be easier to clean?

Also, did you know the fittings were reversed before the guy had trouble or did you notice it while he was trying to resolve the problem? Just wondered if that was the reason you were watching the video (that the fittings were reversed)......
I noticed it while he was trying to solve the problem. He has a Kubota B-series tractor. Back when Kubota released the new BX models I noticed they had reversed couplers but I thought it was just to accommodate the single-point that they now come with. This video was just a guy I watch all the time and he was talking about problems he has getting the loader reattached each spring. One issue was having it on uneven ground and the other was due to pressure in the lines. My initial thought was "Oh, so they have the problem too". But then he went on to describe how it was difficult to release the pressure due to not being able to push on the tip. I then became aware that some of the B-series also have reverse couplers.
 

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What would be Kubota's logic for reversing the fittings? Could it be to prevent dirt and debris from getting in the female couplers which have historically been left on the tractor to be subject to tough conditions by having the male connections on the tractor instead, which would be easier to clean?
That can't be it because 'skid steer' style flat face female couplers, have the orifice all the way flush to the face. Unlike the female AG couplers which leave the female side wide open (much like an Ex GF of mine, but I digress lol).
I'm thinking because it's easier to pull back on the sliding collar while pushing it over the male side at the same time, with both hands on it, then it is to have one hand on the female side holding the collar open, while the other hand has to push the male side in. About the only reason I can come up with.
I agree with the OP, silly for it to be backwards, and unable to bleed the pressure with the FEL lever.
 

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That can't be it because 'skid steer' style flat face female couplers, have the orifice all the way flush to the face. Unlike the female AG couplers which leave the female side wide open (much like an Ex GF of mine, but I digress lol).
I'm thinking because it's easier to pull back on the sliding collar while pushing it over the male side at the same time, with both hands on it, then it is to have one hand on the female side holding the collar open, while the other hand has to push the male side in. About the only reason I can come up with.
I agree with the OP, silly for it to be backwards, and unable to bleed the pressure with the FEL lever.
Well, I think I will just take you at your word on this matter........

Those goofy Kubota kids, you just never know what they are going to come up with next........
 

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I noticed it while he was trying to solve the problem. He has a Kubota B-series tractor. Back when Kubota released the new BX models I noticed they had reversed couplers but I thought it was just to accommodate the single-point that they now come with. This video was just a guy I watch all the time and he was talking about problems he has getting the loader reattached each spring. One issue was having it on uneven ground and the other was due to pressure in the lines. My initial thought was "Oh, so they have the problem too". But then he went on to describe how it was difficult to release the pressure due to not being able to push on the tip. I then became aware that some of the B-series also have reverse couplers.
Was this the video?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FF80JPmpKEM
 

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Discussion Starter #12

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I think a dowel or plastic push rod would have worked to release the pressure.


It looks to me 1/2 his issue was he didn’t line up correctly before hooking up the hydraulics. You see when he pulls in that the right side is hitting its spot but the left is still 1-2” infront of its mount spot. If he had fixed his approach it would have dropped on close enough to install 1 pin and use hydraulics to adjust the second to deal with a tilt.
 
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