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Just out of curiosity. I’m looking over the manual before I take delivery of the machine on Wednesday. This is my first SCUT. I grew up around garden tractors and all that but never I’ll be back from travel by Friday night. Do you have any recommendations as to what I should have on hand at all times? Ie: type of oil, type of coolant, grease and grease gun etc..
I just want to make sure I’m starting on the right foot with proper break in and wear and tear etc.. any advise is greatly appreciated.
I know come Saturday morning I’m going to want to practice taking the FEL on and off, mower on and off, and practice hitching up to my rear blade
 

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I’m looking over the manual before I take delivery of the machine on Wednesday... Do you have any recommendations as to what I should have on hand at all times? Ie: type of oil, type of coolant, grease and grease gun etc..
Since you have access to the Operator's Manual the best advice I can give you is to follow what is listed in the manual for engine and hydraulic oil, coolant and grease. It is important to use the proper specification of fluids and lubrication products. You don't HAVE to stick with JD products but most do, especially during the warranty period as it just makes things simpler. As for grease guns, there are a lot of different ones out there and they all pump grease. Most manual ones are in the same price range so pick up one from the dealer (along with a few tubes of grease) or get one from Tractor Supply or any automotive parts store. Most prefer the pistol-grip type with a flexible hose (myself, I prefer the lever type).

I highly recommend that as soon as you take delivery you CHECK all fluids to ensure they are at the proper level - don't rely on the dealer having done it.

Also, this might sound silly but if you have a digital camera or smartphone, take a lot of photos of your tractor upon delivery. Front, back, sides, under the hood, the hydraulic hookups, etc. The more detail the better. You won't believe how many times down the road you will ask yourself "Was it like that originally?" and being able to go back and review the photos is priceless.

Have fun with your new machine.
 

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The maintenance is not much different than your garden tractors, but with a lot more grease zerks. Don't overthink it, and don't try to outsmart John Deere and/or your dealer. Do not fear, you will have no shortage of advice on care and maintenance as many of your fellow John Deere owners weigh in with their personal preferences ;) . Follow the manual, follow JD's service intervals. There is no specified break-in for your machine. Oil brand doesn't matter as long as it's at least the API service classification that Deere specifies. Grease brand doesn't matter either, nor does the brand of grease gun. Any good lithium complex grease in any particular grease gun will be fine. Consider a LocknLube or Lumax grease gun nozzle...those really do simplify the job of attaching to a zerk.

Good luck, have fun, be safe. These things are extraordinarily useful tools.
 

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The maintenance is not much different than your garden tractors, but with a lot more grease zerks.
Not necessarily. JD has eliminated a lot of the zerks on the newer 1-series. I recall there are only around 4 now (two drive shafts).

My X500 garden tractor has the same number of zerks. :cool:
 

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AM116304 is the JD part number for the small fuel filter. Recommend having 1, if not 2, on hand at all times. Not often but sometimes these will plug up 'out of the blue'. Usually something that's in the fuel, but not apparent, that causes them to plug up. They're cheap, at about $5 from the dealer. If you need one, it's nice to be able to replace it quickly.

723709
 

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AM116304 is the JD part number for the small fuel filter. Recommend having 1, if not 2, on hand at all times. Not often but sometimes these will plug up 'out of the blue'. Usually something that's in the fuel, but not apparent, that causes them to plug up. They're cheap, at about $5 from the dealer. If you need one, it's nice to be able to replace it quickly.

View attachment 723709

X2
 

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AM116304 is the JD part number for the small fuel filter. Recommend having 1, if not 2, on hand at all times. Not often but sometimes these will plug up 'out of the blue'. Usually something that's in the fuel, but not apparent, that causes them to plug up. They're cheap, at about $5 from the dealer. If you need one, it's nice to be able to replace it quickly.

View attachment 723709
X3
 

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Do you have any recommendations as to what I should have on hand at all times? Ie: type of oil, type of coolant, grease and grease gun etc..
Will you be doing the recommended maintenance yourself, or will you be depending on your dealer for service.

BTW, check and adjust the tire pressures after delivery and before you start playing around taking the mid mount mower off and on. To little or too much psi can affect the tractor height enough to make the mower installation difficult. My SCUT was delivered with 45 psi in all the tires. Should be 22 front and 20 rear. While you are dealing with the tires, check that all the lug bolts are tight.
 

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AM116304 is the JD part number for the small fuel filter.
View attachment 723709
AM116304 is the JD part number for the small fuel filter. Recommend having 1, if not 2, on hand at all times. Not often but sometimes these will plug up 'out of the blue'. Usually something that's in the fuel, but not apparent, that causes them to plug up. They're cheap, at about $5 from the dealer. If you need one, it's nice to be able to replace it quickly.

View attachment 723709
This. You can also buy them at Lowe's. Same part number in JD packaging because they fit a long list of mowers.
 

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While it is good for the mechanically savvy owner to keep some fluids and other service parts on hand, the OP is starting with a brand new tractor. So I offer him some perspective from 5 years and almost 900 hours. I do all recommended service myself by the tractor manual recommendations.

Number of times I have had to add engine oil, coolant, or hydraulic fluid, - zero.
Number of non-scheduled fuel filter changes - zero
Number of belt or hose replacements - zero.

I bought a case of 12 grease cartridges when the tractor was new, plus a Dewalt 20V grease gun and a loknlube. I still have 2 grease cartridges left on the shelf.
 

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While it is good for the mechanically savvy owner to keep some fluids and other service parts on hand, the OP is starting with a brand new tractor. So I offer him some perspective from 5 years and almost 900 hours. I do all recommended service myself by the tractor manual recommendations.

Number of times I have had to add engine oil, coolant, or hydraulic fluid, - zero.
Like yourself, the majority of new users don't experience any problems. But it is not uncommon, especially on a new machine, for a hose loosen and start leaking or a hydraulic fitting to loosen and start leaking. It is also not uncommon for the engine to burn a little oil during the initial hours. Some folks find they need to add a wee bit of engine oil, others not. I assume you don't have many hydraulic implements. When you add a new implement the cylinders need to fill with fluid and it is almost certain you will need to add a bit of hydraulic fluid. The more implements you have the more you may have to fiddle with the level until everything equalizes.

Number of non-scheduled fuel filter changes - zero
Here again, I'm not sure where the OP is located. Some folks never seem to have fuel problems while others seem to constantly have issues when the temps dip into the single digits. It's no fun having the tractor disabled due to something as simple as a fuel filter. If you live in a cold climate and plan to use the tractor for winter cleanup duties it is very prudent to keep a set of fuel filters on hand. It's like a spare tire... you may never need it but when you do you'll need it bad. :)
 

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Lynch pins
Channel Lock's
"Tractor" rag
Hearing protection/tunes
Gloves
And......
Everything Ken offers at Bolt On Hooks
 

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You are going to find more ways to use your new tractor than you have imagined. And also, you might just find that what you were planning on making the focus of your tractor's activity, doesn't happen as much as you thought.

I would VERY STRONGLY suggest you order the John Deere Technical Service Manual, since you are planning on doing the maintenance work yourself. This book is THE comprehensive repair guide and the one used by the Service Technicians at the dealership, etc. Here is a link to ordering the manual, or you can order it or possibly purchase it right at the dealership parts counter.

SKU TM126919

Make sure to order the TSM for your machine based upon serial number, which I think is going to be the SKU TM126919, but confirm that before you order the manual. Also make sure its in English, assuming that the language you would like the manual in. They are in the $150 price range, depending upon which format you purchase.



You have a choice of downloading the manual, buying it on CD Rom or purchasing the bound book, which is about 3" thick. It's whatever forum you prefer. You can search the CD-Rom version as well as the Downloading version, where you will have to read the table of contents in the book version. I prefer the book version.

Just make sure it's a Genuine, authentic John Deere 1025r (1023e and 1026r) Technical Service Manual as there are cheesy copies, back knockoffs and some outright garbage out there which selling $150 Technical Service Manuals attracts the riff raff trying to steal the hard work and efforts of others.
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One other thing I strongly suggest you do is to purchase new, dedicated diesel fuel jugs for the tractor's diesel fuel. There are threads galore about the different fuel jugs and fuel handling methods so read and think about where you are storing fuel, etc. as to the type of fuel containers you are going to use. Most people keep at least one 5 or 6 gallon diesel fuel jug along with their tractor's tank. I feel you should have a minimum of two fuel containers as that way, when you fill the tractor after purchasing your fuel, you will still have another jug on hand containing fuel for the next fill.

Personally, I really like these fuel jugs (link below) and I have tried many.............Please note, if your tractor has the Mauser cab, you will need to use either the clear fuel pouring spout or get a funnel which fits the tractor. If your tractor doesn't have the cab, then any diesel fuel jug will likely work. I like these jugs as they are very easy to pour, they don't slosh fuel, they are tall enough I can stand and fill them at the fuel station without having to hunch over. I have 12 of these fuel jugs for my needs, but most people need just the two fuel jugs.


As a general rule of thumb, your tractor will burn approximately 1 gallon of diesel fuel per 1 hours of engine operation. The fuel tank on your tractor is a little over 5 gallons, so 5 hours worth of use per tank full, just to use to judge the amount of fuel you will need to have on hand. Avoid running your tractor out of fuel, while it is a self bleeding fuel system, its best to not run it empty.

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Also, make sure from inception to always treat the diesel fuel year around with a good diesel fuel treatment product. I prefer Howe's Diesel Fuel treatment, but Standyne, Royal Purple and others are also very good. I would make it a habit to always treat your diesel fuel by adding the correct amount of treatment to the fuel container before filling it at the station. Every fuel jug, every time you purchase fuel, no exceptions.


Make sure to purchase your diesel fuel from a station which sells a lot of fuel. The higher the volume of diesel fuel sold, the less likely there is to be water in the fuel tank as the inventory should be changing quite often. Even if it means a little more money, buy the best quality fuel. I suggest checking the website for the fuel station or asking them who is their fuel supplier and going to their website to see the details about their diesel fuel. This will tell you if they blend winter fuel and also inform you about the cetane levels of the diesel, which is somewhat akin to the "Octane" levels, in terms of the ability of the fuel to produce power. The higher the cetane, the greater the power when it burns.
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One other very important point. Personally, I avoid using any BioDiesel fuel. Why? Because Biodiesel has as much as 10 times the amount of "moisture in suspense" which is water in the fuel based upon how it is processed. Water in diesel fuel is the source of most problems, such as filter freeze, fuel gelling, etc. Also, Biodiesel degrades more quickly than "Dino Diesel", which is the full petroleum product from dead dinosaurs, etc. (you know what I mean)

If you see a listing on the pump which says B20 Diesel or something similar, that means that diesel fuel is blended with 20% bio diesel fuel and 80% petroleum or "Dino Diesel" fuel. Personally, I avoid using ANY bio diesel in my equipment. Many people choose to burn bio diesel.

Bio diesel has lower cetane levels, meaning you need to burn more bio diesel to produce the same amount of power as you do with Dino diesel. I avoid using any Bio Diesel and will continue to, others may tell you they burn Bio diesel and have no issues, which is certainly possible. I want the best quality fuel, with the highest cetane levels for power and the least natural "moisture in suspense", which is water in the fuel.

Handle your fuel purchases and storage this way year around and you will avoid having fuel system issues. It also keeps the tractor running well as these high quality diesel fuel treatments not only protect again cold weather filter and fuel issues, but also they provide valuable fuel top lubricants to help reduce wear on the injectors, injector pump, etc. Plus there are important detergents in the fuel additive to keep the fuel system clean.

Take some time and read about fuel and issues such as "Cold Flow / Filter Freeze" and Paraffin Separation so you know how these issues can happen. I also always screen all of my fuel through a dedicated fuel funnel with a brass screen in the funnel. In over 25 years, I have never had a fuel related problem any time of the year. Also, the fuel filters stay cleaner by screening the fuel. Some see this as unnecessary, but I still do it.............

Make sure to have fun, be safe and ask questions here or of your dealer if you aren't sure. We have a policy here on GTT where the only stupid question is the one someone fails to ask or is too ashamed to admit they don't know.......

Welcome to GTT and we look forward to seeing pictures of your machine in use.
 

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Doesn’t say it in the manual, but check all the loader mount bolts and re torque them at 10 hrs if necessary.
 

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Doesn’t say it in the manual, but check all the loader mount bolts and re torque them at 10 hrs if necessary.
Actually, it is in the manual:

First 10 Hours

□  Lubricate fittings on each side of the loader. (See procedure in Every 10 Hours in this section.)
□  Tighten pivot pin nuts on both sides of the loader. (See procedure in Every 50 Hours in this section.)
□  Tighten the mounting frame hardware on both sides. (See procedure in Every 50 Hours in this section.)

The "Every 50 Hours" section lists the torque specs for the various fasteners.
 

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My bad.
 
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