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Okay, hauled by 1025R for the first time the other day, and I really think it needs some tie down locations on the front. Has anyone installed eye bolts or anything to the frame to make it easier to haul it? I could put on some Ken's hooks on the loader, but I'd prefer to secure to the frame of the tractor. Plus, can't scratch the paint :)
 

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Never been a fan of eye-bolts! They are not the strongest steel, and can open up. If you've got a friend at the Telephone or Power Company, see if they can salvage a couple of the fully closed "U" Loops that they use. ~Scotty
 

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Lifting Eye

Never been a fan of eye-bolts! They are not the strongest steel, and can open up. If you've got a friend at the Telephone or Power Company, see if they can salvage a couple of the fully closed "U" Loops that they use. ~Scotty
Oops! Agree 100% on the eye bolts. I meant more the lifting eyes that are forged and have a flange.
 

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Lifting eyes are not ideal for securing a load. They're designed to take strain in line with the threads, basically trying to pull the threads straight out of a hole. If you put a side load on them by pulling at an angle the way we do with chains hauling equipment, lifting eyes will bend. After enough uses, they will break. They're also designed and rated for full thread engagement, where the eye threads fully down into a block. Using a nut on the threads would not engage as many threads and would significantly decrease what the eye will hold.

The shackle through the frame method that Haze posted looks really nice. You could also consider chaining to the brush guard where it attaches to the frame.

The tractor should be secured independent of the loader. Attaching to the rear of the tractor and the loader bucket is a bad plan, just like attaching only to the front of the tractor and a rear implement.
 

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Lifting eyes are not ideal for securing a load. They're designed to take strain in line with the threads, basically trying to pull the threads straight out of a hole. If you put a side load on them by pulling at an angle the way we do with chains hauling equipment, lifting eyes will bend. After enough uses, they will break. They're also designed and rated for full thread engagement, where the eye threads fully down into a block. Using a nut on the threads would not engage as many threads and would significantly decrease what the eye will hold.

The shackle through the frame method that Haze posted looks really nice. You could also consider chaining to the brush guard where it attaches to the frame.

The tractor should be secured independent of the loader. Attaching to the rear of the tractor and the loader bucket is a bad plan, just like attaching only to the front of the tractor and a rear implement.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^What he said^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Lifting eyes have been abused since the day they were invented. They are great for in-line pulls or fairly close, but the moment you go at an angle greater than about 25* they lose a considerable amount of strength. 56 is absolutely right, don't use lifting eyes unless you are pulling on them in a pretty straight, in-line with the hole it's threaded into. Don't risk your multi-thousand dollar investment in a lifting eye at a bad angle.:thumbsdown:
 

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For the rear I have a clevis in the hole under the PTO (draw bar).

For the front I have the weight bracket bolted to the frame and loop the chain through. To keep the chain off paint I raise the loader and set the bucket down on the digging edge (dump position).
 

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On my 2305 I loop an axle strap around the front of the frame and then hook my chain/ ratchet tie down to that. I use one on each front corner.
 

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Here is how I strapped mine in using heavy nylon ratchet straps. I hauled it about 300 miles round trip.









I would haul it this way again. There were no sharp edges on the nylon straps. If I do see that becomes a problem, I will stick a rag between the strap and the metal edge.
 

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Here is how I strapped mine in using heavy nylon ratchet straps. I hauled it about 300 miles round trip.

..............

I would haul it this way again. There were no sharp edges on the nylon straps. If I do see that becomes a problem, I will stick a rag between the strap and the metal edge.
Technically, you are quite illegal with that setup by DOT standards. Since your not hauling commercially they may not ever say anything, but...

I'm not trying to be the safety police, just trying to inform.
 
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What is wrong with using the front bracket and putting your hook on the front part of the frame and rear lower hitch under the PTO or as

psrumors stated .

For the rear I have a clevis in the hole under the PTO (draw bar)

Agree with kennyd ilmo your tractor was not legal according to dot but to everyone there way of securing your tractor.
 

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Texas DOT requires the tractor to be secured and then the bucket to also be independently secured; however, the bucket cannot be used to secure the tractor. You cannot secure the tractor with any independent moving implement attached to the tractor. You can only guess how I found this out. :lol:
 

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I don't mean to start a debate and I am sure every state has their own laws for hauling gear but for a newbie what is the proper way to secure the tractor to a trailer. I know when mine was delivered the dealer had one strap going across the floor boards. I sure you are required more than.

And thanks again for this site, I can't thank everyone enough for all the info I learn from reading through these threads.
 

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I don't mean to start a debate and I am sure every state has their own laws for hauling gear but for a newbie what is the proper way to secure the tractor to a trailer. I know when mine was delivered the dealer had one strap going across the floor boards. I sure you are required more than.

And thanks again for this site, I can't thank everyone enough for all the info I learn from reading through these threads.
I was taught one strap or chain at each corner, pulling away at an angle, then one on each implement/attachment holding it down. Your dealer (actually the driver) is crazy...
 

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I was taught one strap or chain at each corner, pulling away at an angle, then one on each implement/attachment holding it down. Your dealer (actually the driver) is crazy...
I agree with Kenny. The straps or chains should be secured to a solid heavy part of the tractor. It is also always important to secure the implements even if they are attached to a secured tractor.

I would not recommend across the floorboard of a 1 series tractor.

If using straps, be sure the strap does not contact any sharp edges. They can be cut much easier than you would think as the wind vibrates the strap and the trailer rides on rough roads. I am the king of cut straps.:good2:

Be sure you are binding or strapping down to a very secure anchor point on the trailer. I have seen many loads come loose when hooks slide along angle iron or pipe rails on trailers which were anchored to.
 
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Wanted to share my experience carrying the Tractor about 200 miles.

I read the posts here about tying down the tractor independent of the attachments. Found good points on the frame to tie to and tied down the backhoe and loader.

After about 80 miles I was going to check the straps at the rest stop. A trucked pulled up and pointed to the back. Pulled into the rest stop and one of the straps had unraveled from where I had tied up the excess and was dragging behind the trailer. I found the outriggers had bled down and there was a reinforcement plate with a sharp edge that had cut a 1/3 of the way thru my strap. I didn't have extras (will in the future) so reconfigured and tied up the outriggers.

When I picked up the tractor, I strapped down again watching for edges. The back of the bucket that was touching the straps seemed harmless enough. 5 miles and the corner ate thru both straps partially.

Good tie down locations are important. So are the devices holding them down. I'll go with chains from here on out.
 

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For a chafing sleeve, check with your local fire dept. for some old hose! Split firehose works great to protect from sharp edges. ~~ Lowell
 
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