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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Can somebody explain the difference between working load and break strength of tie down straps and why they advertise both?

Also if you use multiple straps is the working load cumulative or should each strap be higher than your load?

For example lets say a tractor weights 2500 lbs. Should each strap have a working load over 2500 lbs, or if you use 2 straps can they both have a working load of 2000 and you will be safe because the total 4000 working load is higher than 2500 load weight?

I have always tried to have each strap have a working load higher than the load weight. I'm in the market for some new straps now and really don't want or need 25 or 30 foot straps again, but all of the shorter straps have a lower working load weight. This has me pondering the above questions.
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Doing some research I have found that normally working load is 1/3 of the break strength.

This document makes me think I have been really over killing the tie down of by 1023E.

http://ohioline.osu.edu/aex-fact/pdf/0598.pdf

It is recommended that the total working load
limit (WLL) of all used tie-downs must equal at least
half of the cargo’s weight. For example, if you are
hauling a small tractor that weighs 12,000 pounds, at
least four tie-downs with a combined WLL of 6,000
pounds (1,500 pounds each) will need to be used.
To find this aggregate working load limit depends
on how the chain or strap is secured.
One method is to connect directly to a manufactured
anchored point on the trailer then through, over, or
around the cargo to another manufactured trailer
point. This is referred to as an
indirect tie-down
and has the full WLL rating of the chain or strap
The second method is adirect tie-down This is
when a tie-down is attached from a manufactured
anchor point on the truck or trailer to an attachment
point on the cargo (i.e., frame of vehicle or equip
ment). Using this method of tie-down provides half
of the WLL of the chain or strap
 

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They advertise breaking strength because it makes the straps sound stronger.

If you have a 2,000 lb load to secure, your straps need to add up to 2,000lbs working capacity. I prefer to go with straps or chains equivalent to the load in the front and rear. For a 2k load I'd have straps in the rear adding up to 2k, and the same in the front for 4k total. It's probably overkill, but the forces experienced in an accident can be massive.

You can always buy the long ratchet straps and cut off what you don't want.
 

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Load strengt is a static number. When you add motion, i.e. haling your tractor on a trailer, a 2,300 lbs it could weigh double that if stopping fast, thus it is good to know how much the strap will handle before it breaks. I would love to give you all of the math on increase in force due to change in speed but I have forgotten all of the math. :flag_of_truce:
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
If you have a 2,000 lb load to secure, your straps need to add up to 2,000lbs working capacity.
This is always what I though to, but all the sites I have been reading are saying the straps only need to be 1/2 the load to be secured so a total of 1000 lbs working load in this example.

I agree with you that it it better to be safe than sorry and use a higher working load. I will continue to make sure the total WLL is over the weight of my cargo.
 

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I usually just get a 10k strap for each corner. My tractor or my Jeep is not going anywhere I don't want them to go. More importantly is use as short and as straight of connection as you are able and don't cross-over the straps. If one breaks or comes loose the other has a gob of slack.

I believe in overkill.

Jim
 

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I currently am using 2 10,000# straps on the rear and 2 5,000# on the front of my 1025R tractor. I feel the back needs higher rated straps due to the extra stress in case of a panic stop. I would not consider using less. My straps originally were 30 feet long, but that was such a hassle, that I cut them down to 8-10 feet.

Dave
 

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Here is some good article's written by Fritz Dahlin from B/A Products. Fritz is a expert in this stuff, he assisted me (actually I assisted him I guess) in the proof testing of my hooks. This focus of these articles are geared more towards the towing industry (their primary business), but the info applies the same to strapping a tractor down.

http://baprod.com/images/stories/wll_article.pdf

http://baprod.com/images/stories/web_article.pdf

http://baprod.com/images/stories/twist_or_knot.pdf

http://baprod.com/images/stories/recovery_straps.pdf

http://baprod.com/images/stories/chain_article.pdf

http://baprod.com/images/stories/testing_article.pdf
 

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Here is some good article's written by Fritz Dahlin from B/A Products. Fritz is a expert in this stuff, he assisted me (actually I assisted him I guess) in the proof testing of my hooks. This focus of these articles are geared more towards the towing industry (their primary business), but the info applies the same to strapping a tractor down.

http://baprod.com/images/stories/wll_article.pdf

http://baprod.com/images/stories/web_article.pdf

http://baprod.com/images/stories/twist_or_knot.pdf

http://baprod.com/images/stories/recovery_straps.pdf

http://baprod.com/images/stories/chain_article.pdf

http://baprod.com/images/stories/testing_article.pdf
This is great Kenny. Perhaps we should put a copy of these in the tech library?
 

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It always baffled me that 4 straps was all DOT legal, when Mass X Vel. squared was the number rolling around in my head....considering I'm in the truck in front of the thing.

8,000lbs X 50mph squared equals 20 straps and a chain or two.:lol:

I mentioned it one day to my cousin, who is a bit of a Nerd (Spray Pilot/ former Corpsman), and he brought up attachment angle influencing the amount of force exerted in a linear direction, and possibly needing to be considered.:boredom:

The law says one thing, reality dictates others quite often. Like when ya run out of sound attachment points.:laugh:

 

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I currently am using 2 10,000# straps on the rear and 2 5,000# on the front of my 1025R tractor. I feel the back needs higher rated straps due to the extra stress in case of a panic stop. I would not consider using less. My straps originally were 30 feet long, but that was such a hassle, that I cut them down to 8-10 feet.

Dave
Something to think about...
How fast can you stop in a "panic"? I bet not nearly as fast as you can "accelerate" if hit from behind.

I have a bunch of 10,000 lb ratchet straps. I use as many as I can find a place to attach to when hauling stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
The 1 series weight for tractor and front end loader is around 2000 lbs.

According to the document I linked to earlier since its under 10,000 pounds 2 straps should be OK. I usually use indirect tie down method. One strap through the front weight bracket and one strap through the rear hitch.

Using the indirect tie down method you can use the full Working Load Limit (WLL) rating of the strap, and you need 1/2 the weight of the cargo which is 1000 pounds WLL.

Standard 1 inch straps with 1500 Lbs break stregth and 500 Lbs WLL: 2 straps = 1000 LBS WLL = minimum OK way to tie down the 1 series. If you have loaded tires or wheel weights the straps dont have enough WLL.

Heavy Duty 1 inch straps with 3000 Lbs break strength and a 1000 Lbs WLL: 2 straps = 2000 LBS WLL = OK way to tie down the 1 series (2 times the minimum recommended strap )

5K yellow strap 5,000 Lbs Break strength, 1666 Lbs WLL: 2 straps = 3332 Lbs WLL = OK way to tie down the 1 series ( 3.3 times the minimum recommended strap )


10K yellow strap 10,000 Lbs break strength, 3333 Lbs WLL strap (what I have been using) : 2 straps = 6666 LBS WLL = enough strap for 3 1 series tractors :laugh:

OK, the above is based on the document I had linked to earlier...I dont think anyone in their right mind would\should use either one of the 1 inch strap options. Also the above assumes brand new condition straps..some of the documents Kennyd linked to shows you what happens to the WLL when the strap starts to fray, gets knots or twists in them.

I'm thinking of changing to 4 5K straps direct tie down method (i.e each stap from tractor to trailer). With the Direct tie down method you get half the WLL of the strap, so 1666 times 4 divide by 2 = 3332 Lbs WLL. Why the change? I broke\cut one of my 10K straps where it rubbed either on the front weight bracket or the rear hitch I dont remember.

I may actually continue to use my 10K strap on the front, and 2 5K on the back, but I would use a strap protector at the weight bracket. I think I will also start using a 1 inch heavy duty strap on the loader.


My total WLL would be 5998 LBS ... 10 K strap, (indirect method = 3332 WLL), 2 5K straps (direct method = 1666 WLL total) and 1 inch loader strap ( indirect method 1000 WLL)
 

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Here is some good article's written by Fritz Dahlin from B/A Products. Fritz is a expert in this stuff, he assisted me (actually I assisted him I guess) in the proof testing of my hooks. This focus of these articles are geared more towards the towing industry (their primary business), but the info applies the same to strapping a tractor down.

http://baprod.com/images/stories/wll_article.pdf

http://baprod.com/images/stories/web_article.pdf

http://baprod.com/images/stories/twist_or_knot.pdf

http://baprod.com/images/stories/recovery_straps.pdf

http://baprod.com/images/stories/chain_article.pdf

http://baprod.com/images/stories/testing_article.pdf
Very interesting reading Kenny.
 

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The 1 series weight for tractor and front end loader is around 2000 lbs.


10K yellow strap 10,000 Lbs break strength, 3333 Lbs WLL strap (what I have been using) : 2 straps = 6666 LBS WLL = enough strap for 3 1 series tractors :laugh:

I use 4 of these straps on my 1026r, 1 on each corner! :thumbup1gif:
Using 2 straps, 1 front and 1 rear, will only secure the tractor from moving forward or backward, it can still move side to side. Thus the reason for using 4.

Mr. Moose
 

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The key is to also use as short of strap as possible. If say one of the rear straps snap the other won't let the whole tail end move side to side much if it's short.

Jim
 
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