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I know there's a lot of threads on this and I have done a ton of research sifting through those threads but I'm having trouble on my decision. I need a tiller for my 1025R and I see the best option is for sure a 4' tiller so I'm good there. It seams the majority of people go with either the King Kutter or the TSC CountryLine tiller for their SCUT.

Comparing between the two; the CountryLine is a bit less than the KK. Any real reason to spend a bit extra for the KK over the CL? I know the KK is not quick hitch compatible, but I cannot find any information about the Country Line being compatible with a quick hitch; is it?

Also I see the depth only shows 4" on the specs for the Countryline, but the KK depth was double that. Is that realistic?

My local JD dealer has a Woods tiller coming in but it is $600 more than the TSC Countryline tiller. The JD tiller is an extra $1k so definitively not going that route. I like the idea of purchasing through the dealer since they would support repairs, I'm just not sure it's worth the extra cost. What happens when the TSC tiller breaks? Are parts readily available? Do shops work on these?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Timely thread. I am planning (hoping?) to go get the CountyLine tiller from Tractor Supply this weekend. I have read a lot on this and still don't feel that I fully understand what's going on. It is my understanding that the CL is quick-hitch compatible (hoping again).

IMHO, the 4" depth is perfectly fine as I would imagine that is about all a SCUT (like a 1025R or my 2305) is going to be able to do, especially depending on the type of soil being tilled.

I think the CL is built by Tarter (?) so parts, etc., should be available. These things appear to be built like tanks.
 

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First things first, the County Line is iMATCH ready, just put the bushing kit on and go. I have a 48", definitely runs about 6-8" on a second pass through the gardens. KK is a very good tiller as well, really can't go wrong with either one, I went with the CL because TSC is near me.
 

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I know there's a lot of threads on this and I have done a ton of research sifting through those threads but I'm having trouble on my decision. I need a tiller for my 1025R and I see the best option is for sure a 4' tiller so I'm good there. It seams the majority of people go with either the King Kutter or the TSC CountryLine tiller for their SCUT.

Comparing between the two; the CountryLine is a bit less than the KK. Any real reason to spend a bit extra for the KK over the CL? I know the KK is not quick hitch compatible, but I cannot find any information about the Country Line being compatible with a quick hitch; is it?

Also I see the depth only shows 4" on the specs for the Countryline, but the KK depth was double that. Is that realistic?

My local JD dealer has a Woods tiller coming in but it is $600 more than the TSC Countryline tiller. The JD tiller is an extra $1k so definitively not going that route. I like the idea of purchasing through the dealer since they would support repairs, I'm just not sure it's worth the extra cost. What happens when the TSC tiller breaks? Are parts readily available? Do shops work on these?

Thanks in advance.
The company is supposed to direct you or "help you locate" and authorized service center if it's a warranty issue. Otherwise, it's going to be whatever tractor dealer or repair shop you can get to fix it, that is assuming you can't or won't be fixing it yourself.

TSC, from what I have been told, can "send some equipment out for repairs" just as the big box stores (Lowe's, HD, etc,.) where they have a "service center" somewhere that handles the repairs. I do know that in the case of our local "Big Box stores" they will literally "fill a trailer" with stuff needing repairs and when the trailer is full, out it goes and it comes back when the trailer comes back. That means that some people were waiting 8 to 10 weeks this winter for their snow blowers, so you can imagine how happy they are......

I know that Rural King, which is a store chain out of either Illinois or Missouri, is similar to a TSC but they are now launching "In Store Small engine and Lawn and Garden Repairs" within a store run service center. While this is certainly better than the "load the trailer" approach, I happen to know the guy hired to be our Rural King's first "Service Manager" as he was previously employed as a service writer at Deere.

Also, the reality is that I don't hear too many people having trouble with these tillers, to be honest. I guess with the money saved, if you did have to pay a local "Small Engine Repair" shop to repair it for you, it might still make sense.

Of all the people who run tillers on various equipment here on GTT, I honestly can't recall too many having problems. Make sure to keep it greased well, try to store it inside out of the elements if possible and make sure the gear box is full of the right kind of oil and you will probably be OK.

Also, there seems to be a fair number of people who buy tillers and don't use them as they planned, so I see them on Craigslist and other sites for sale. A good brand used machine might be an option if they are available in your area. Usually, they come up for sale around the end of summer as people are done with them or realize another season where they didn't use it and now it's time to sell it.

I would stop by and talk with your local store manager and ask them specifically about the repairs and how they handle them. See what they say. I know I was at TSC recently looking at a fertilizer spreader and they had a retired guy in the back who put the stuff together and he "fiddled with them". The spreader I was looking at was assembled incorrectly and I pointed that out. He told me that he would fix it, but I ended up not wanting that brand anyways......

One last thing. Talk to whomever services your non Deere lawn equipment and see if they can and would work on the tiller for you if you needed something done. If you have a relationship with someone and you like them, why not have them work on the tiller if it should need repairs? It's worth asking them......:dunno: In the case of warranty work, You would have to pay, but at least you would have a repair source and maybe if it is pre arranged with the manufacturer, they might reimburse some of the warranty costs, it's worth checking..
 

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First things first, the County Line is iMATCH ready, just put the bushing kit on and go. I have a 48", definitely runs about 6-8" on a second pass through the gardens. KK is a very good tiller as well, really can't go wrong with either one, I went with the CL because TSC is near me.
To the Original Poster on this thread, pick up a set of the I Match bushings when you are at the Deere dealer and anything which will fit the Category 1 should be able to have these bushings installed on it and then it will work with the I Match. I suggest keeping a set of these on your shelf or in your spare parts inventory so you have them as any 3 ph implement you ever add or use, you will want these on it. They take just a few minutes to put on and a ball peen hammer.

I have read where some have had to modify the Harbor Freight and other "Quick Hitch" "adapters" by grinding out material or modifying the center hook. If you have skills and tools, then this isn't a concern. If you don't have a grinder or such tools or the confidence to modify the Non Deere units, just spend the money and get the Deere I Match adapter and be done with it.

The I-Match is clearly a great item to have on any tractor.......I use mine nearly every day and it makes hooking up and dropping 3ph implements as simple as it could be..........................That's why you rarely see the I Match hitches for sale used as everyone who has a Deere tractor owns one and uses it and wouldn't want to be without it.
 

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I think it boils down to money, muscle and mentality. If you like setting things up and tinkering The King Kutter and Harbor Freight Quick hitch are cheaper and pretty darn good. The King Kutter 48 inch is a Beast. But takes some work to make it quick hitch compatible. My 1025R with the H120 loader can lift it but not by much.

If you want more of a turn key set up and have the coin, go green. As I travel through the journey of life, I get better looking every year. But I don't get any richer. So I went with the Harbor Freight and KK 48 XB. I believe the KK was $1279.00 and the HF quick hitch was $80.00.:usa:greentractorride:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the information! I just ordered the country line tiller from TSC and I'll go pick it up tomorrow. Is any assembly required or they come ready to go?

It sounds like all I'll need to pick up in addition to the tiller is gear oil? Any specific kind? And how much?

I think I'll pick up the imatch hitch if it's really that much better. They're $340 at my JD dealer.
 

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Yes you will have to assemble

I have the CL 48" Tarter and it needs oil and the upper attachments must be put together and bolted on. They have a good manual you can download at the Tarter website. Good Luck I am sure you will enjoy it.:gizmo:
 

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I really like my 48" Hawkline tiller built by Behlen. I got mine at Bomgaar's, but it's the same as the CountyLine tiller TSC offered. With that being said I've seen different area Tractor Supplies have different suppliers for their tillers. My local TSC has different tillers than when I bought mine. They now have a more rounded metal shape and the gear case cover seems to be stamped where mine is a thick chunk of plate steel. Make sure the slipper clutch is in good shape also. Some of them sit outside for a long time and rust up.

-636
 

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I really like my 48" Hawkline tiller built by Behlen. I got mine at Bomgaar's, but it's the same as the CountyLine tiller TSC offered. With that being said I've seen different area Tractor Supplies have different suppliers for their tillers. My local TSC has different tillers than when I bought mine. They now have a more rounded metal shape and the gear case cover seems to be stamped where mine is a thick chunk of plate steel. Make sure the slipper clutch is in good shape also. Some of them sit outside for a long time and rust up.

-636


My local TSC has a brand new 60" tiller sitting inside... My wife has to hold my hand when I pass by, too tempting to say "I'll take it!" :mocking:
 

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I recently bought the 48" yellow TSC tiller made by Tarter. Was going to get the Tarter subcompact orange one but it was used and had a bad seal.

The yellow tiller doesn't have much lift even with my iMatch but once I started going through my rocky soil I was glad I got this one. It digs up some really big rocks.

I had to assemble the top portion and also had to cut 1 1/2 inch from the PTO shaft.

My slip clutch was sticky so I disassembled it and cleaned it with steel wool. Then I burned it in and finally tightened it to about 1 3/4 turns of each nut. That was the part that was the most work but I wanted to make sure the slip clutch was working well.

I ordered another adjustable lift arm so I can do the height mod for when I use the tiller.

Overall very happy with it.
 

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You've already ordered your tiller so not trying to offer brand advice. They are all pretty much comparable to each other anyway, even the Frontier ones that you pay almost twice as much for. You'll love the one you're getting.

You did ask a question about depth. I highly doubt that any tiller in this class could get down to 8" depth. Sure doesn't seem like the 60" KK Pro I have gets that deep, even in the great soft black dirt my garden has. But they all will do far better than a walk-behind so it will be fine.

If you're going to use a quick hitch make sure you have it and start out with it so you don't end up cutting your PTO shaft short (hooked up direct to 3pt arms) and then have it be too short later when you use the quick hitch.

Rob
 

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Thanks for all the information! I just ordered the country line tiller from TSC and I'll go pick it up tomorrow. Is any assembly required or they come ready to go?

It sounds like all I'll need to pick up in addition to the tiller is gear oil? Any specific kind? And how much?

I think I'll pick up the imatch hitch if it's really that much better. They're $340 at my JD dealer.
I had to assemble the upper hitch portion, and put the PTO shaft together.

Also, take a look at the tiller tines to make sure they are correct. Mine were backwards when I bought it. 8 bolts, flip the entire thing around and good to go!
 

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Thanks again everyone. I picked up the tiller and assembled it yesterday. Also picked up the iMatch hitch from JD. Can't wait to use it. I'm having trouble with figuring out how to correctly determine the measurements to cut the PTO shaft thought. I watched a bunch of Youtube videos and still am confused, they all seem to show a different method. What's the best / easiest way?
 

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Timely thread. I am planning (hoping?) to go get the CountyLine tiller from Tractor Supply this weekend. I have read a lot on this and still don't feel that I fully understand what's going on. It is my understanding that the CL is quick-hitch compatible (hoping again).

IMHO, the 4" depth is perfectly fine as I would imagine that is about all a SCUT (like a 1025R or my 2305) is going to be able to do, especially depending on the type of soil being tilled.

I think the CL is built by Tarter (?) so parts, etc., should be available. These things appear to be built like tanks.
Something to consider - it may not be wise to till any deeper or more frequently than you have to. It pulverizes the soil and damages the substructure. If the soil becomes reduced to a homogenate of fine particles, there is no room for air pockets or for water to pass through. This is one of the reasons that many are going to no-till garden and farming.

I have a tiller that I plan to use on a field that I have to recover, but I am hoping that I don't have to go down much more than an inch to get a decent seedbed. After that, craigslist...

Tilling does seem to have been elevated to a recreational activity, so I hope this reply doesn't draw any fire! But folks should be aware of the impact that it has on their property, which is often the opposite of what conventional wisdom might suggest.
 

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Thanks again everyone. I picked up the tiller and assembled it yesterday. Also picked up the iMatch hitch from JD. Can't wait to use it. I'm having trouble with figuring out how to correctly determine the measurements to cut the PTO shaft thought. I watched a bunch of Youtube videos and still am confused, they all seem to show a different method. What's the best / easiest way?
What do you have in terms of tools to cut the shaft?

Also, now that you have the specific tiller, the IMatch Hitch, perhaps one of those GTT members who use the same set up on their 1025R can verify the length of their PTO shaft so you have confirmation of the length which will in fact work for your set up.:good2:
 

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Something to consider - it may not be wise to till any deeper or more frequently than you have to. It pulverizes the soil and damages the substructure. If the soil becomes reduced to a homogenate of fine particles, there is no room for air pockets or for water to pass through. This is one of the reasons that many are going to no-till garden and farming.

I have a tiller that I plan to use on a field that I have to recover, but I am hoping that I don't have to go down much more than an inch to get a decent seedbed. After that, craigslist...

Tilling does seem to have been elevated to a recreational activity, so I hope this reply doesn't draw any fire! But folks should be aware of the impact that it has on their property, which is often the opposite of what conventional wisdom might suggest.
I agree with you on the damage that a roto tiller can do, but no till has been around for decades in farming, and it works well but every few years you still have to till to break up compaction. Of course that's real farming, not a compact with a tiller but the concept can be applied just the same.
 

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I agree with you on the damage that a roto tiller can do, but no till has been around for decades in farming, and it works well but every few years you still have to till to break up compaction. Of course that's real farming, not a compact with a tiller but the concept can be applied just the same.
Yes - used wisely, it can solve problems.
 
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