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Discussion Starter #1
Just got a really good deal on a 6' Mahindra tiller but the rear flap is missing. A new replacement is about $350 so I'm wondering if using the tiller without the flap will affect it's performance?
I know it's there for safety but isnt it also an adjustable feature that controls how "fine" you can chew the media?
What are your experienced thoughts on using the tiller without the flap or a cheaper alternative for replacing the flap?
 

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AC, I used my tiller....a 48" on a L&G tractor, but the principal is the same...for a few years in Connecticut where my ground was absolutely beautiful...rich, black, soil with no stones. I am now south of you in Athens Tn...where my "ground" is clay & stone! Both in CT & TN, 95% of the time my rear flap is up. I've never had problems with anything "flying out of the back of the tiller" where the rear shield may deflect it. As far as how fine you chew the media, my experience has show that ground speed determines that. The shape of the tines lead me to believe that there're not going to pick up the soil and recirculate it through the tines again. Could be my tiller or my lack of experience, can't say. I WILL say, if you've got a good deal on the tiller, get it! Bob
 

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Just got a really good deal on a 6' Mahindra tiller but the rear flap is missing.
If you got a really good deal “because” the rear flap was missing, you didn’t get a really good deal. You’ll need that rear flap.
 

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Just got a really good deal on a 6' Mahindra tiller but the rear flap is missing. A new replacement is about $350 so I'm wondering if using the tiller without the flap will affect it's performance?
I know it's there for safety but isnt it also an adjustable feature that controls how "fine" you can chew the media?
What are your experienced thoughts on using the tiller without the flap or a cheaper alternative for replacing the flap?
On my old tiller, the flap down leaves a better looking finish. I think it also helps to break down the clumps better, depending on soil type.

Are you handy at all? Don't take this the wrong way. If you or a friend can do it, get a couple of hinges and a chunk of something flat, like plywood for example, and fashion your own flap. That way you won't have much invested and can see the difference in running with it up or down.
 

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Yea, I agree, you'll want that rear flap eventually. Check with the local fab shop for a price but $350 might be hard to beat considering the OEM will be painted and fit as designed.:unknown:
 

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Id think a decent fab shop could build you one for considerably less.
I used to sell one for the 42" hydraulic tiller made from 1/8" steel instead of the sheet metal thing that came with it. It was around $100, and I wasnt giving them away.
The last one I made was 48" wide, and about the same cost.

Now, I didnt roll the end like some of the larger ones have, but if it costs you more than $150-200, something is very very wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for all the replies.
I've thought about making one but finding the material(other than plywood) is the toughest part.
 

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I've thought about making one but finding the material(other than plywood) is the toughest part.
I was only suggesting plywood for a cheap test to see the difference with and without the flap. Then you can decide if it's worth the $$$$ for the OEM part. Sorry I was not more clear.

Another though is you could get a couple of 24"x36" mud flaps. A rattle can of paint if desired.
 

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I was only suggesting plywood for a cheap test to see the difference with and without the flap. Then you can decide if it's worth the $$$$ for the OEM part. Sorry I was not more clear.

Another though is you could get a couple of 24"x36" mud flaps. A rattle can of paint if desired.
A plywood flap will not give a good indication of what a proper flap will do.

One of the main functions of the flap is to break up clods and smooth high spots. They way the flap manages that is with weight. A quality tiller, like the JD 665, has a very heavy rear flap, and the roll of the bottom edge helps it leave a smoother finish, though I would think that is less important than the weight. A cheaper tiller will have a thin gauge flap which is ok for debris deflection, but wont do squat as far as finishing the tilled soil.
 

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A plywood flap will not give a good indication of what a proper flap will do. They way the flap manages that is with weight. A quality tiller, like the JD 665, has a very heavy rear flap, and the roll of the bottom edge helps it leave a smoother finish, though I would think that is less important than the weight. A cheaper tiller will have a thin gauge flap which is ok for debris deflection, but wont do squat as far as finishing the tilled soil.
Geez Louise. Weight is easy to add. This ain't exactly rocket surgery. :banghead:
 
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