Green Tractor Talk banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
430 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I noticed that most people seem to prefer a disk to a tiller and have been trying to figure out why. I think alot has to do with the low ground speed when operating a tiller and well people just get restless.:unknown:

It seems that most would need to pull a disk and make three or four passes with it at 6 mph or one pass with a tiller at 1.5 to 2.0 mph. I have used both disks and tillers and prefer the tiller for my current uses. I was recently comparing a Frontier 1508 pull type wheeled disk and a 1396? or 1308? 3pt disk to the Deere 681 tiller. The wheeled disk is kind of pricey but all the wheeled disks I have used have done a better job. Both of these disks are with 22" notched blades front and rear.

Which do you prefer and why? Assume an equal comparison for tillage depth and consistentcy. How many of you have both a good disk and good tiller to compare results?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,564 Posts
For a smaller area, under 1 acre, I think a tiller has an advantage over a disk. A tiller will leave a seen bed perfect without lumps and can aerate much better. The downside is that a tiller will follow the contour of the ground on the outside edges. On rough ground a disk will win.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
971 Posts
I have a tiller. I've never used a disk. I like the tiller because it is a one pass device. It also helps to have hydro so you can adjust your low speed.

I've seen a disk be used a number of times. It's a higher speed operation, but to get even close to the results of a tiller it's a multi pass operation. The high speed also favors gear tractors and does not have the close-in control of the tiller.

Brian's comments make sense- short of making a new golf course it's hard to think of when you would want to till up 20 acres of land.

So on Tillers vs. Disk, what say you? I say:

Tillers are good for an acre or less, great for lawn prep, best on a hydro transmission tractor. Also great for single family vegetable garden type prep.

Disks are good for large areas and great for crop fields or hay fields prep.

The farmer that cuts my hay also does a vegetable crop for selling at the farmers market. He has a specialty machine that tills, embeds perforated water lines, hills, and covers with plastic. The tractor moves about a foot every two seconds. I attached a pix of the finished product even though it's slightly off topic since this takes a specialized machine.

Pete
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
430 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Brian, EEpete,
Thanks for the replies, it seems that most people when tillers are mentioned only consider the small models. Yet when these same people look into disks they consider a wide range of sizes from light to heavy duty models.

I was recently looking into tillage equipment for some small pastures and was comparing the Frontier RT1380 to the DH1508 pull type disk, both of these are in the same price range. I am looking for more information and experiences with the larger heavy duty tillers because they are a lot easier to transport.

Pete looked at your picture posted and would say that is the largest acre I have ever seen.:lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
We sell about equal numbers of tillers and discs. I agree that for food plots and smaller acreage a tiller may be best way to go. Large fields of 5-10-20 acres, most customers prefer a plow and wheel disc. We do sell a few of the new 10 ft roto tillers that can cover a lot of ground fast, however, they are pretty pricey. Ken Sweet
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
733 Posts
Tough question really...IMO every tool has its job. Without knowing the job at hand, I couldnt say one way or another.
Even with a Tiller and a Power Rake here, this summer I wouldnt have minded a disc to take care of some buckwheat I had planted as a soil ammendment... IMO while the tiller does turn the soil nicely, its sometimes a little too aggresive for my super sandy soils...Last fall I planted winter rye, this spring it was spotty & patchy (as for the soil...think dark brown beach sand :mocking:) I just wanted to scratch the surface enough to let some buckwheat seed take hold and with the rye there somewhat established, it was holding a little moisture in...A disc woulda done that for me...

Same story as Plow vs Tiller.....Used to think I had the world by the tail with my tiller in the garden....I now only till in the spring, and plow in the fall. I can already tell you that weeds will be MUCH better controled and I am building my soil up much better with the plow...you shoulda seen the hardpan I pulled up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Kinda old thread, but thought I would ad to it.

I own both a disk and tiller. The disc is almost 7 foot wide and most of the time its too 'big' for my rows of trees on 8 foot centers, tends to take out the seedlings with very little sway'n action and needs extra passes or some sort of harrow or drag pulled behind to leave a nice smooth surface, wich a harrow or drag really likes to flatten the seedlings

With the tiller, wich mine is almost to small 48", It is more in control, leaves a smooth finish one pass and works better if the clay is set up a little harder. Draw backs are more fuel, wear on a higher maintenance implement....but get more seat time 'not a draw back':lol:

I would probably not even have the disc, but the price was right....:tongue: Really looks good lined up with the rest of the toys....er.... uh tools:lol:

The pic is a shot from the seat last fall tilling the rows between the seedlings. The field is four acres worth of seedlings, took a while with the 48" tiller having to make two passes each row.

But the results were rewarding with the smell of fresh worked earth and a clean, smooth field.:cool:

Anybody have a 60-65 inch tiller they look'n to get rid of:question:
 

Attachments

1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top