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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Very little remains of what once was a typical American farm. My granddad bought a small farm after WW2 and pretty much things was set in motion then. Theres a lot I could write about but to keep this short and to the point I'm just hitting the highlights.

Over time his two eldest sons started their own roots farming together and somewhat quickly became a fairly large operation for our area during that specific time. By the early 70's they were to a point of needing to upgrade equipment and pretty much was going to do it by the "go big or go home" mindset. In came a IH 915 combine, 2 IH 1066's tractors, IH 8 row corn planter, 8 row John Deere bean planter, grain trucks, plows, disks, etc etc etc. All of this stuff is considered small in today's world but in the 1970's these boys was farming.

I grew up on this farm and loved every minute of it! As a lot of folks know or remember the agricultural business took some really hard knocks in the early 80's as many other areas of industry did in this country and that is the biggest factor in what kept this farm from growing any larger. Other than trading the 915 combine off for a newer machine, the equipment purchased in the 70's was still in use putting out crops up until 2007. The grain was still being hauled out of the fields in the same trucks purchased back then. These guys drilled into my brain maintenance is everything and using the same equipment for over 30 years says something, to me it does anyways.

The last few years they farmed it was more for passion than business and eventually health and age trumped the passion. Most everything was sold with exception of some acreage, the shop, shed, a few tractors and handful of implements. Last week we buried one of the two uncles that taught me most everything I know to this day. The other has health issues that keeps him pretty much kicked back in his recliner, granddad has been gone for years, and the rest of family has scattered to different counties and many to different states so there's not many of us around these days. I was honored when my aunt called and asked me to come "put away" what equipment is remaining and thought I would share a few pictures of some of the old iron that once made the money.

The 135 Massey Ferguson is the first diesel tractor ever to come onto the farm and granddad purchased it on 10/10/1966. I know this because the dealership put his name and the date purchased onto a small plaque and it's still on the tractor today. This tractor has been flat out amazing, other than replacing one front rim, the injector pump, and the seat this tractor has ran since the day it came home new with virtually NO problems. It has a 3 cylinder Perkins and the tractor is estimated to have around 8 thousand hours. I say estimated because this tractor has worn out several tachs and we simply lost track of the hours each had when replaced. The 1066 is a 1975 and was the tractor that did the majority of tillage work and ran hay equipment. It has had one clutch, a TA, injector pump, and 1 major engine overall. Other than that it's untouched including the turbo. The original engine started knocking around 10 thousand hours and when it was rebuilt, a new tach was installed and its reading 1684 hours today. The other tractor is a 1959 Massey Ferguson 50 gas burner. This tractor had very little to do with our farming operation, it was one of those "think I'll buy that just because I like it" tractors by my uncle in his later years. It's got 6143 hours on the original working tach and other than a cam shaft being replaced, a paint job in the 80's and probably a dozen carb rebuilds, it's pretty much untouched mechanically as well. I removed the bushhog off the 1066, pulled the rear blade off the Massey 50, and lined them up in the shop where the combine and headers once was stored. I pretty much did all it takes to store a tractor for an extended amount of time.

As much as it breaks my heart I'm anticipating these old tractors to sit here until the tires dry rot off them. It's crazy to have looked around at what once was a staple of a small community where everyone gathered to tell stories and borrow tools to patch up the stuff they broke on their properties but those times are long gone, it's now just a pole barn housing what little remains.
 

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What a great piece of history and story. You are correct, there is no stopping time, it is up to us to remember. Thank you for the post. :thumbup1gif:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'd like to read this but find it impossible due to the wall of text. Could you put some paragrahs in there (by hitting the enter button once in a while)?
Sure thing sir, give me a moment.
 

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Thanks for the memories. Has a Farmall employee i probaly put the front tires and Hubs on the 1066. It is a great tractor that still has some work left in it. I worked there from 1972 till the plant closed. Hopefully they find a new home and get back to work. If you have no use for them have your Aunt sell them i know she could use the money and your grandfather would want to keep them going not just setting. that 1066 open station is a good tractor most of them are Cab tractors.:greentractorride:
 

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ky_shawn,

I couldn't agree with you more.

My Great Grandfather started a farm after emigrating to the US in 1901. After he passed, my Grandmother (the eldest child), put her Brother in charge of the farm and he ran it until the early 70's before passing it on to his Son. I visited a few times as a small boy, when my Mother went to visit her aunts, uncles and cousins.

By the early 2000's most of the farm had been sold off. I was one of those that moved to another state at that time. I haven't kept in close contact with my distant cousins that still had the farm. I don't even know if it's still in the family. Time, change and death are things you just can't stop.

That was a wonderful story and great pictures. It brought back memories.
Thanks for sharing!
 

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Sure thing sir, give me a moment.
Thank you very much! Going back up to read it now.

-------------------

Loved your story! Not only the machinery aspect but the heritage of your family and the farm. I see that you really appreciate all of it.

The original equipment being used all that time is awesome. It remimds me of a local highway/road contractor - all major work on roads here in PA is done by contractors. Don't know exacty when or how old - but around 25 years ago this contractor bought close to 100 Peterbuilt tri-axle dump trucks. I would bet that 95% of them are still used everyday.

This guy was very demanding about the maintenance and of the drivers. One example is that if you didn't warm up your truck for at least 5 mimutes at the beginning of the day you were done. He also will not let them convoy which is so common with dump truck drivers arounds here - 4 or 5 of them running together. They had to be spaced out if they happened to come upon each other.

Your story gave me a good feeling - a success story in a very hard business during very hard times.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Thanks for the memories. Has a Farmall employee i probaly put the front tires and Hubs on the 1066. It is a great tractor that still has some work left in it. I worked there from 1972 till the plant closed. Hopefully they find a new home and get back to work. If you have no use for them have your Aunt sell them i know she could use the money and your grandfather would want to keep them going not just setting. that 1066 open station is a good tractor most of them are Cab tractors.:greentractorride:
With one uncle still living I'm not sure what will come of the tractors. If the opportunity arises I would be honored to purchase them and keep them in working order. When they started me disking on the 1066 I was to small to push in the clutch sitting down, I had to stand on the clutch to get it depressed. In today's world someone would have had them arrested for putting a kid on a tractor with a cooler full of pop and turning them loose in a field.

The left side fender has the paint worn off in the middle of it from all the butts that sat on the fender to ride along over the years. That alone warrants never wanting this tractor repainted. Lots of memories!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the memories. Has a Farmall employee i probaly put the front tires and Hubs on the 1066. It is a great tractor that still has some work left in it. I worked there from 1972 till the plant closed. Hopefully they find a new home and get back to work. If you have no use for them have your Aunt sell them i know she could use the money and your grandfather would want to keep them going not just setting. that 1066 open station is a good tractor most of them are Cab tractors.:greentractorride:
I also want to thank you for your words about working for farmall and most likely being the one who put the hubs on it when it was new. It's my understanding they were only made at the one plant. The duals are still the original tires it came from the dealer with. The rest had been replaced several times but those duals never was and have been worn out and weathered for as long as I can remember. The insides was always loaded for weight but the duals wasn't and used for floatation to keep the soil from compacting as bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
ky_shawn,

I couldn't agree with you more.

My Great Grandfather started a farm after emigrating to the US in 1901. After he passed, my Grandmother (the eldest child), put her Brother in charge of the farm and he ran it until the early 70's before passing it on to his Son. I visited a few times as a small boy, when my Mother went to visit her aunts, uncles and cousins.

By the early 2000's most of the farm had been sold off. I was one of those that moved to another state at that time. I haven't kept in close contact with my distant cousins that still had the farm. I don't even know if it's still in the family. Time, change and death are things you just can't stop.

That was a wonderful story and great pictures. It brought back memories.
Thanks for sharing!
Amazing to think about a farm being started in 1901 and still being around over 100 years later! Glad it brought back a memory and I welcome any memory from anyone that would like to share something they would like to not be forgotten.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you very much! Going back up to read it now.

-------------------

Loved your story! Not only the machinery aspect but the heritage of your family and the farm. I see that you really appreciate all of it.

The original equipment being used all that time is awesome. It remimds me of a local highway/road contractor - all major work on roads here in PA is done by contractors. Don't know exacty when or how old - but around 25 years ago this contractor bought close to 100 Peterbuilt tri-axle dump trucks. I would bet that 95% of them are still used everyday.

This guy was very demanding about the maintenance and of the drivers. One example is that if you didn't warm up your truck for at least 5 mimutes at the beginning of the day you were done. He also will not let them convoy which is so common with dump truck drivers arounds here - 4 or 5 of them running together. They had to be spaced out if they happened to come upon each other.

Your story gave me a good feeling - a success story in a very hard business during very hard times.

I appreciate you saying that, it gave me a good feeling writing it.
 

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Good story Ky_shawn.

I can see from the looks of the tractors that your family took good care of them.
 

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Great story, great pics!! :good2:

Really like the IH 1066 Turbo, that old animal looks like it has a lot of life left in it, looks in really good shape.
 

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The left side fender has the paint worn off in the middle of it from all the butts that sat on the fender to ride along over the years. That alone warrants never wanting this tractor repainted. Lots of memories!
A bitter sweet story of a good ole farming family. The above quote made me smile, I hope one day to give the same memories I have of the old dairy farm down the road to my daughter. The old man passed away 5 years ago and now the farm is being pieced out and mini-mansions are being built on 2 acre parcels. I will never forget Gene Dansizen and how a cows' tongue feels on my hand.



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Discussion Starter #15
Good story Ky_shawn.

I can see from the looks of the tractors that your family took good care of them.
They were well cared for!
 

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Great story, great pics!! :good2:

Really like the IH 1066 Turbo, that old animal looks like it has a lot of life left in it, looks in really good shape.
The steering is loose and sloppy but I wouldn't be afraid to start off a year having to depend on it to get crops out.
 

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A bitter sweet story of a good ole farming family. The above quote made me smile, I hope one day to give the same memories I have of the old dairy farm down the road to my daughter. The old man passed away 5 years ago and now the farm is being pieced out and mini-mansions are being built on 2 acre parcels. I will never forget Gene Dansizen and how a cows' tongue feels on my hand.



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She will be grateful for every memory you pass on to her, that's a sure bet! I know exactly where your coming from with seeing the land pieced out, I always knew it could happen but never thought it would if that makes sense.
 
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