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Discussion Starter #1
Ok so I’ve been looking at trailers and trailer threads for quite a few months now. After just renting a uhaul for the 1025r I’m done going that route too much of a pain.
Speaking to the wife the plan is when we get the new place this spring I’m going to buy a trailer. Few factors in what I’d like for a trailer.
- 14 or 16 length 6ft wide with or without dovetail not a must for me as I think the folding gate matters more as I doubt the mmm will drag. Altho I will have attachments rear snow blower tiller etc...
- 2 axels (3500 or 5000lb axels) must both have electric brakes
- side and front stake pockets a must possibly rear if possible
- a half length foldable ramp or a fold in ramp

I plan on using it for hauling the 1025r both local roads and highways, also hauling materials (dirt mulch stonej and supplies
I seem to be between equipment/car haulers and a utility trailer. I like pj and load trail I know they are basically the same, I’m also open to a custom job and don’t mind driving as if I get a pj I’ll order it from an outfit in PA even though I’m in mass.

These two I’m interested in but again open to a local or another brand as well

https://www.pjtrailers.com/trailers/c5-5-inch-channel-carhauler

Really leaning towards the utility...

https://www.pjtrailers.com/trailers/uk-77-inch-tandem-axle-channel-utility



For now I’ll be towing it with a V6 tacoma with tow package that states 6500 capacity. And in a year or two will be getting a full size truck. I’d like this trailer to last a long time I prefer to buy once and buy right if possible.

So any suggestions on another brand or likes/dislikes on pjs I’d love to hear.
 

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As a point of reference, here's my former 1026r on my current Gatormade 18' car hauler:

hslF76Kj4LOgWRbY47IunwrQ1qiC5krwIEFBV6UC1pcLcHO8J-lCAwzdbILvFlkTHLfUkZ6Zgzay3DoUZSPFTz2HyFZzGJwj.jpg

I would have gotten a 20' if they made one at the time. In my area I was down to Gatormade and Big Tex, Gatormade was cheaper, but looked better than the Big Tex trailers when I bought.

I was experimenting, but never ended up towing this load:

Bb9Xq8RbnxBL3XzWoGAzWMTbqzc-CWKyOFQPQg5f4yYaNzJsm-CG0y8YcvEj9TYDd3CfyY0_-nDFXaT8jgw8yHOeXj3bEdie.jpg

You can load from the side with a car hauler, so that might be of interest to you. You can always build sides for it.

I post these pics so you will consider length. If the trailer is too short, you may have a hard time balancing the load, especially if you have a gate and do not have the ability to overhang the rear at all.

Now somebody is going to come along and tell you that you need a 30' deck over goose neck...you don't. :laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
As a point of reference, here's my former 1026r on my current Gatormade 18' car hauler:

View attachment 477114

I would have gotten a 20' if they made one at the time. In my area I was down to Gatormade and Big Tex, Gatormade was cheaper, but looked better than the Big Tex trailers when I bought.

I was experimenting, but never ended up towing this load:

View attachment 477122

You can load from the side with a car hauler, so that might be of interest to you. You can always build sides for it.

I post these pics so you will consider length. If the trailer is too short, you may have a hard time balancing the load, especially if you have a gate and do not have the ability to overhang the rear at all.

Now somebody is going to come along and tell you that you need a 30' deck over goose neck...you don't. :laugh:
That’s a nice trailer! That is one thing I like about the pj I can take the sides off... then again I can always make sides as well with a car hauler. Oh and I’m sure and also a f-450 to haul it which I’d love but right now not in the cards.
 

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I have hauled my equipment almost daily for several years and own/use various trailers for the work. I suggest a 16' over the 14' mainly for load balancing with the truck your currently going to use plus you will appreciate the extra length in general. Like mentioned already, someone will probably suggest a 30' gooseneck. To add to that, someone will also say you will need a 1 ton diesel as well. For the equipment you listed as hauling and your planned uses, a 16' car hauler will suit you great. Build some sides to throw on it when your hauling materials and your good to go. I personally like dovetails just for the ease of loading equipment. It helps when/if you have an implement on the 3 point to prevent it dragging while loading/unloading but hey, if you don't need it then why pay for it. As far as drop down gates, what load limits do the gates have on the trailers your looking at? I have been well within spec but still made some drop gates look ragged rather quick when I started rolling 1500ish lbs up and down them several times with previous tractors I have owned. It wasn't as much of a weight issue on the gates as it was where the weight was rolling on them.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I have hauled my equipment almost daily for several years and own/use various trailers for the work. I suggest a 16' over the 14' mainly for load balancing with the truck your currently going to use plus you will appreciate the extra length in general. Like mentioned already, someone will probably suggest a 30' gooseneck. To add to that, someone will also say you will need a 1 ton diesel as well. For the equipment you listed as hauling and your planned uses, a 16' car hauler will suit you great. Build some sides to throw on it when your hauling materials and your good to go. I personally like dovetails just for the ease of loading equipment. It helps when/if you have an implement on the 3 point to prevent it dragging while loading/unloading but hey, if you don't need it then why pay for it. As far as drop down gates, what load limits do the gates have on the trailers your looking at? I have been well within spec but still made some drop gates look ragged rather quick when I started rolling 1500ish lbs up and down them several times with previous tractors I have owned. It wasn't as much of a weight issue on the gates as it was where the weight was rolling on them.

Thanks some great points, I was concerned about the gate as well where the supports are if they would line up with the tractors wheels especially if I’m off loading dirt etc and the constant driving on it with added weight.
I love the idea of slide in ramps and noticed I can get some with the utility trailers as well... I’m wondering how heavy are they usually? When I think of the slide in ramps I think of how much of a pain that long sliding ramp is on the back of some box trucks. Only reason I like the gate is because it’s spring assist. (Granted I’m still young so I was thinking long term and less wear and tear on me ha) I haven’t seen any slide in ramps in person yet all I’ve seen at work sites I’m at are the equipment haulers.
 

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I have a setup like the one you are looking to get. I wanted sides cause I haul a lot of bulk type items besides the Deere. I have a 16' PJ utility trailer if I had it to do over I would have gone 18'. I have found that the PJ trailer is well built. I like the way PJ has the tongue jack mounted, when connected to the truck the jack can be rotated so when I lower the tail gate on the truck the jack is out of the way.

Doug
 

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Question. Will my Toyota Tacoma haul a trailor big enough for my 2038R?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I have a setup like the one you are looking to get. I wanted sides cause I haul a lot of bulk type items besides the Deere. I have a 16' PJ utility trailer if I had it to do over I would have gone 18'. I have found that the PJ trailer is well built. I like the way PJ has the tongue jack mounted, when connected to the truck the jack can be rotated so when I lower the tail gate on the truck the jack is out of the way.

Doug
That looks like what I’ve wanted in a utility trailer! And I agree the fold away jack is nice to save the tailgate.I just have a few questions if you don’t mind?
How is the fold up gate, does the machine ride on the supports or has the gate gotten beaten up over time? Did you get the standard gate or another model? Also wondering I see you got the flat deck any issues with the mmm or implements dragging on or off? I’m between the 72 and 77 inch wide deck is that what you have or did you go wider? How does the Tacoma do when pulling it? Did you consider the carhaulers also or just the utility model? And if you were to do it over other than going longer anything else you would change about the trailer?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Question. Will my Toyota Tacoma haul a trailor big enough for my 2038R?
What is the weight of the2038r? I’m pegging a 1025r with fel and mmm and my heavy hatch setup with 12 weights and fluid (fuel oil)at 2500 lbs that might be off but figure it’s around that. And the heavy old U-Haul 6x12 I’m pulling is 1,730 and Toyota says I can pull 6500 total empty bed and I know that’s not doing the math with the sticker on the truck in the door. But I’d say I’d try it on local roads. But if I had a trailer or was going to buy one I’d make sure it has brakes. As especially the U-Haul that has surge brakes I know the tractor is back there not so much the empty trailer but loaded you have to be mindful. As for pulling I had no problem pulling on on ramps for highway with the ramps even at an incline like I said just drive smart as with any trailer.
Short answer it should be good if under the weight but just my humble opinion. I’m sure there will be others that have the machine or similar and will give a much better answer.
 

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I have a setup like the one you are looking to get. I wanted sides cause I haul a lot of bulk type items besides the Deere. I have a 16' PJ utility trailer if I had it to do over I would have gone 18'. I have found that the PJ trailer is well built. I like the way PJ has the tongue jack mounted, when connected to the truck the jack can be rotated so when I lower the tail gate on the truck the jack is out of the way.

Doug
That is a good point. I can't open my tailgate with the trailer hooked up.
 

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I agree with the comments on length. Get a little more length than the overall length of the tractor and implements so you can get the balance right. I have a car hauler and at times wish it was a deck over, particularly when hauling hay. I use a couple of boards and stakes if I have to haul loose material. It's not an issue with dirt or rock as I quickly reach the 7,000 weight limit before really getting much on the side boards.

Go for brakes on both axles and the charging circuit is pretty much standard these days but still something to look for. I was surprised the trailers had 2" balls, I'd prefer 2 5/16" on a 7,000 lb trailer. The fold down jack is a very nice touch- wish I had that set up.

I have the individual fold down ramps on the car hauler and they are pretty heavy but manageable without lift assist. I'm in my 60/s so no longer young. I have a dump trailer with pull out ramps and those are also heavy and not as easy to use as I thought they would be. Fortunately, I've never had to use them but did try set up just to see how big of a PITA they are. I'm glad to have them but normally load the tractor on the car hauler. It's a bit long for the dump trailer if I have an implement on the back. I usually scrape the ground with the rear implement when loading onto the car hauler. Not an issue on dirt but could be an issue if I loaded on pavement. If you get a folding tailgate, I'm pretty sure you will see it start to bend over time unless the track area is reinforced for loading equipment. I'm not a real fan of a utility trailer for equipment. They tend to be lighter built plus I like a flat easy step area for getting on and off the equipment. I don't want my foot hitting a rail and me possibly going face first to the ground while my foot is hung up in the rail.

LED lights are worth it, again they are becoming standard but sometimes an option.

I'd take a real good look at how chains would be used on the trailer. Having more strong, secure tie down spots is better. I've wished for additional spots on my trailer and added a couple. D rings in the floor are good, as long as they are strong and securely mounted. D rings on the sides are also good. Better yet is having both in multiple locations.

When you buy the trailer, go ahead and get a set of wheel chocks. 2 is good, 4 are better. When loading there is a time when the weight on the back of the trailer lifts the weight off the truck. If you are on a hill, the truck parking brake doesn't work very well. Fortunately, I learned that from reading about it, not personal experience but I chock the trailer wheels when loading or unloading if there is any slope at all. Equipment ramps usually have a leg to prevent too much drop at the rear, I end up putting blocks under mine to limit it even more. I can pretty much judge the squat on the trailer when loaded so I put enough block to prevent too much dip when loading but then the trailer rises off the blocks when the tractor is in place.

Since you are planning on keeping the trailer for the long haul, I'd get what you want even if it costs a bit more.

Treefarmer
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I agree with the comments on length. Get a little more length than the overall length of the tractor and implements so you can get the balance right. I have a car hauler and at times wish it was a deck over, particularly when hauling hay. I use a couple of boards and stakes if I have to haul loose material. It's not an issue with dirt or rock as I quickly reach the 7,000 weight limit before really getting much on the side boards.

Go for brakes on both axles and the charging circuit is pretty much standard these days but still something to look for. I was surprised the trailers had 2" balls, I'd prefer 2 5/16" on a 7,000 lb trailer. The fold down jack is a very nice touch- wish I had that set up.

I have the individual fold down ramps on the car hauler and they are pretty heavy but manageable without lift assist. I'm in my 60/s so no longer young. I have a dump trailer with pull out ramps and those are also heavy and not as easy to use as I thought they would be. Fortunately, I've never had to use them but did try set up just to see how big of a PITA they are. I'm glad to have them but normally load the tractor on the car hauler. It's a bit long for the dump trailer if I have an implement on the back. I usually scrape the ground with the rear implement when loading onto the car hauler. Not an issue on dirt but could be an issue if I loaded on pavement. If you get a folding tailgate, I'm pretty sure you will see it start to bend over time unless the track area is reinforced for loading equipment. I'm not a real fan of a utility trailer for equipment. They tend to be lighter built plus I like a flat easy step area for getting on and off the equipment. I don't want my foot hitting a rail and me possibly going face first to the ground while my foot is hung up in the rail.

LED lights are worth it, again they are becoming standard but sometimes an option.

I'd take a real good look at how chains would be used on the trailer. Having more strong, secure tie down spots is better. I've wished for additional spots on my trailer and added a couple. D rings in the floor are good, as long as they are strong and securely mounted. D rings on the sides are also good. Better yet is having both in multiple locations.

When you buy the trailer, go ahead and get a set of wheel chocks. 2 is good, 4 are better. When loading there is a time when the weight on the back of the trailer lifts the weight off the truck. If you are on a hill, the truck parking brake doesn't work very well. Fortunately, I learned that from reading about it, not personal experience but I chock the trailer wheels when loading or unloading if there is any slope at all. Equipment ramps usually have a leg to prevent too much drop at the rear, I end up putting blocks under mine to limit it even more. I can pretty much judge the squat on the trailer when loaded so I put enough block to prevent too much dip when loading but then the trailer rises off the blocks when the tractor is in place.

Since you are planning on keeping the trailer for the long haul, I'd get what you want even if it costs a bit more.

Treefarmer
Thanks for the points I’ll say so far this thread with your post and everyone else’s has been very helpful! I was actually looking at adding a drop jack that rotates to each side of the back trailer to help with squat. I think I’m set on a 16 footer and good point about wheel chocks! I have not even thought about those. As for d rings I’m going to try to get as many as I can welded on so it gives me loading options not just for my machine but anything else I may toss on the trailer. Thinking maybe even a box in the front by the jack to store trailer stuff.
Does the charging circuit have to do with the break away system? I was thinking if I needed to hang something off the back wood or such do your ramps fold down on the bed or only up and down on the ground? Granted that is not a big thing as that will rarely happen for example I can’t think of a need for more than 16 ft for right this second. I’m just trying to plan it out as I’d want to pick a good trailer which I know no trailer can do everything but looking for one that will do most. Ideally I’d want two one dump and one flat but I know that’s not in the cards plus to get a dual dump is $$$ I’d say my budget is about 4K.
 

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The weight of the tractor is 2436, or something close to that. With the tires filled and loader on, I say it is near 3500 pounds. Have no clue what one of these trailers weigh.
 

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I tow my 1025r TLB with a V6, automatic Tacoma with tow package. It has no problems handling the loaded trailer and only once on a long incline on an interstate highway was I not able to maintain the speed limit.

As was mentioned by ky_shawn, the shorter trailers make it more difficult to balance the load and with a Tacoma, this is important. My first trailer was a 14' BigTex utility and I was at 450 lbs. tongue weight when balanced. This was a good tongue weight for the loaded trailer, but I had no room for other items on the trailer and I had to rest the backhoe off to the side.

The 14' trailer had a 5' fold-down gate. The tractor's weight did bend the gate's expanded metal and also one of the side hinge pins. This was just from loading and unloading and I never carried material on and off the trailer.

I sold that trailer and bought an 18' BigTex car-hauler with a dove tail. I scraped the dovetail and destroyed the license plate on the way home from the trailer dealer. I ended up installing axle flip kits which raised the trailer 5" and cured the dragging dovetail. The additional height resulted in the backhoe dragging the ground when loading, which was fixed with two 4" thick 2'x2' pads which I place under the ramps. I would not purchase another dovetail.

The 18' car-hauler has slide-out ramps that are slid in and out from the side of the trailer. They are heavy, but not so much that they are uncomfortable to use. For the 1025r and backhoe, the 18' trailer length is just right.

I now have another truck that will handle a heavier trailer. I will eventually purchase an 18' or 20' flush deck equipment trailer with fold down ladder ramps with knees. The car-hauler is nice, but it has slightly raised sides. I have been loading pallets on the trailer and the flush deck will allow me to side load rather than having to use a chain to drag the pallets to the rear of the trailer to off-load. Along with this, the next trailer will have fork storage pockets so the forks can be easily stored when needed away from home at the same time a bucket is needed.

I mention the ramps with knees because the weight of loading the tractor on the 14' trailer would seriously unload the rear wheels of the Tacoma. I never had an issue with the truck rolling, but I was always careful to park on level ground. I would not have attempted to load or unload on slippery ground without the Tacoma and trailer wheels chocked. The issue could have been cured with rear jacks, but that is hindsight.

I do not have a MMM on my tractor and it is likely that the ramp angle which I currently have would cause a MMM to scrape.

You indicate that you want to buy once and buy right and that's what I wanted to do. Unfortunately, I didn't plan ahead for tractor accessories and other uses I would have for the trailer. I think you are headed the right direction and hopefully, you'll decide on a trailer which will handle your needs for years to come.

1025R on the way home from an out of state dealer on the 14' BigTex. Just big enough, but no room for adjustment.

IMG_1004.JPG
 

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Look at a rice trailer at Tim’s RV on rte 2......greenfield I think.....make a great 16 and 18 foot car hauler with built in tool box
 

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A few comments, all random:

1. Craigslist is your friend. I would never buy new even though I can afford it unless I was going to use it every day to make a living. My life philosophy is that you can't go wrong buying 80% of the service life for 60% of the price.

2. Folding jacks are readily available at Runnings, TSC and many other places. It depends on the tongue design whether it makes sense to retrofit.

3. Too long a trailer is a recipe for exceeding the tongue weight if you don't pay attention to loading. See next point.

4. I'm using a 12' TSC special landscape trailer for a 650 pulled by an F250 SD. It has no brakes and doesn't need them with the truck. With the FEL the tractor probably weighs over 2000lbs. I believe that is in excess of the trailers rated capacity (1500 lbs?). I don't use it often or for long trips and I'm going to buy a replacement some day soon. Problems include:
a. It isn't long enough. I need to raise the bucket and let it hang over the bed of the truck or back onto the trailer and let it rest on the ramp. The latter option is safer but I think it shifts too much weight to the tongue.
b. You need tandem axles. Not so much for the capacity as to make it possible to keep the tongue weight in spec.
c. Ramp seems flimsy.

5. Fill in other semi-useful advice here.

Al
 

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Now somebody is going to come along and tell you that you need a 30' deck over goose neck...you don't. :laugh:
30'? that's kinda small isn't it? :laugh:

I brought my 2320 home on dad's 20' car trailer.

If I bought a trailer today, it would be a 24' gooseneck car trailer, with tandem 7k axles. Way overkill for the MCUT, but plenty for any other hauling I may do.
24' will cover any vehicle I ever want to put on it (read CCLB pickup) as well as many accessories.

Granted, I also have a 3/4 ton diesel to pull it with. :good2:
 

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As you say, you are still young so handling slide in ramps will be OK for now. But, you say you intend to buy a trailer once and keep it for a long time, which I'd guess is what most people do.

I can guarantee that as you get older and lose muscle mass, plus tweaking your lower back and neck a few times too many, those ramps will be harder and harder to use.

What I'd do is take your dad or another older person trailer shopping with you. Let the old guy try out the ramps. That way you'll find a trailer that you can grow old with.
 
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