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Just noticed this moisture in the rusted area around valve stem on rear tire. Hadn't really focused on it being moist until I dried it up today. This is a new used tractor (2 months ago) and I think the liquid is calcium chloride in tire for more weight. Not quite sure how to procede and am hesitant to remove collar nut on valve to see what is under. Should I clean up rusted area (about 2 sq inches) and treat? Should I do nothing? Could I used silicone around valve to try to stop leak?

Any ideas? I'm sure this is relatively common.

Thanks in advance for any ideas.
 

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Leak repair

Just noticed this moisture in the rusted area around valve stem on rear tire. Hadn't really focused on it being moist until I dried it up today. This is a new used tractor (2 months ago) and I think the liquid is calcium chloride in tire for more weight. Not quite sure how to procede and am hesitant to remove collar nut on valve to see what is under. Should I clean up rusted area (about 2 sq inches) and treat? Should I do nothing? Could I used silicone around valve to try to stop leak?

Any ideas? I'm sure this is relatively common.

Thanks in advance for any ideas.
If you can afford it and have a tire shop in the area, I would have them come out and pump out the calcium solution and take the tire off the rim. Then you can completely clean the rim, repair and paint and then have them put the tire back on, with a tube if necessary. Calcium in a tubeless tire WILL result in rusting and unfortunately, all too often a tube will leak and again, you will rust the rim.

With two service calls, it could be expensive so check the price before you say "Come on down!". The alternative is to take the tire and wheel off the tractor and haul it to the tire shop but depending on the size of the tractor, that can be a handful. You will have to judge your capabilities against your pocket book. However, you are going to need to get that tire off the rim and fix the problem. Sooner is better than later in this case.

Treefarmer
 
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I would agree with Treefarmer. Calcium chloride is highly corrosive, if you don't properly repair the leak it will get worse and could cost you a set of rims. I would have it removed, and hope your rims are still in a repairable condition. Fix or replace them as needed, then either go with iron wheel weights or have them filled with Rimguard or a methanol/ water mix.
 
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