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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Another "newbie" question from me... I have a 2520 JD and the rear tires are ballasted with what I was told is Rim Guard (beet juice). Today I was a dumb dumb and I went to check air pressures in tires in my new to me tractor and when I checked the rear tires I got a little surprise squirt of watery black liquid. First question is would Rim Guard come out of the tire as a watery black liquid? If so I always heard it smelled... this stuff doesn't smell at all.

Second question is with "loaded" tires do I still fill the other air part of the tire with the same recommended tire pressure that JD lists for my tractor or does it change since 2/3 is now liquid filled? I assume the tire pressure would be the same but just wanted to double check!

Thanks for all of the info you guys have provided me so far. I've had two tractors but didn't own them very long, hoping this 2520 will be around for many many years to come so I'll be looking for guidance from you experts along the way!
 

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Another "newbie" question from me... I have a 2520 JD and the rear tires are ballasted with what I was told is Rim Guard (beet juice). Today I was a dumb dumb and I went to check air pressures in tires in my new to me tractor and when I checked the rear tires I got a little surprise squire of watery black liquid. First question is would Rim Guard come out of the tire as a watery black liquid? If so I always heard it smelled... this stuff doesn't smell.

Second question is with "loaded" tires do I still fill the other air part of the tire with the same recommended tire pressure that JD lists for my tractor or does it change since 2/3 is now liquid filled? I assume the tire pressure would be the same but just wanted to double check!

Thanks for all of the info you guys have provided me so far. I've had two tractors but didn't own them very long, hoping this 2520 will be around for many many years to come so I'll be looking for guidance from you experts along the way!
It's black and it's sticky. Next time you check them have the air valve all the way up at the 12:00 position. I put air in mine. I put about 20 psi in mine. May not need that much but you need enough for the tire to seal against the rim. Fluid is not enough. The rims will spin inside the tire if you get enough traction and HP involved. Found that out the hard way.
 

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It's black and it's sticky. Next time you check them have the air valve all the way up at the 12:00 position. I put air in mine. I put about 20 psi in mine. May not need that much but you need enough for the tire to seal against the rim. Fluid is not enough. The rims will spin inside the tire if you get enough traction and HP involved. Found that out the hard way.
Hmm the stuff I got out was very watery and didnt seem sticky at all. Absolutely no smell. Would Calcium Chloride also be black in color and watery? Trying to figure out what it could be if it somehow isn't Rim Guard (which it still very well may be I guess).
 

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beetjuice is sticky to some degree.

You probly toasted your air gage if it wasn't one for liquid filled tires.....One that is has the spring loaded part with the #'s on it.

Calcium will corode an aluminum air chuck in a short amount of time...you'll see a whitish coating on the chuck within hours or a day probly.

Beet juice could likely be darker....they pump tires (old /flat whatever) into the same tank as they fill new ones....uuuggg.

I new my tire guy and waited till He got a "new" tank in...then had all mine filled with virgin Beatlejuice.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
beetjuice is sticky to some degree.

You probly toasted your air gage if it wasn't one for liquid filled tires.....One that is has the spring loaded part with the #'s on it.

Calcium will corode an aluminum air chuck in a short amount of time...you'll see a whitish coating on the chuck within hours or a day probly.

Beet juice could likely be darker....they pump tires (old /flat whatever) into the same tank as they fill new ones....uuuggg.

I new my tire guy and waited till He got a "new" tank in...then had all mine filled with virgin Beatlejuice.
I might have cleaned it up enough to not get corrosion... but I'll keep an eye out for it. I used some WD-40 on a rag to wipe whatever the fluid was off the rim in hopes to keep it from corroding anything if it was corrosive mix. The stuff was so watery and runny that if you told me it was water with black food coloring in it I would believe you. No sticky aspect to it whatsoever. Hope I didn't get the new kid on his first day that thought they were just putting water in them... :unknown:

The gauge seems fine so far, we will see if anything happens to it over time.
 

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Hmm the stuff I got out was very watery and didnt seem sticky at all. Absolutely no smell. Would Calcium Chloride also be black in color and watery? Trying to figure out what it could be if it somehow isn't Rim Guard (which it still very well may be I guess).
The Calcium Chloride I had in my 9N tires looked like dirty water.

The RimGuard I had in my 2720 was thick brown gunk. I didn't smell it but it reminded me of brown sugar dissolved in water.
 

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Here is a small container of beet juice from a YouTube video.
 

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Here is a small container of beet juice from a YouTube video.
Crap, I think its calcium chloride then. I trust my co-worker I bought this tractor from and his dealer told him it was Rim Guard when he bought it. It makes sense because I see the beginnings of rust at the point where the two sections of rim come together on the inside. I'm sure this will be expensive to replace some day...
 

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Ok so I took a few photos of the rust and also squirted our another tablespoon of fluid to take photo and also mess around with to see if I can confirm what it is. To me there is still very little odor, based on what I do smell I’m actually leaning toward windshield washer fluid? Not sure if it’d look like this thought. Anybody have an idea of how I can test this sample to confirm? If I remember correctly adding baking soda to calcium chloride creates a reaction that bubbles... am I remembering my 8th grade science class experiments correctly?
 

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Rim corrosion is minor on outside, was going to touch up this when the cold arrives in the fall. If the fluid is calcium chloride I would fear it’s rust showing from inside though which would be really bad I would guess?

Please tell me I am over reacting and this is just beet juice haha
 

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If you have a fairly accurate scale, you could pull a gallon out and weigh it. That should tell you what it is.

That looks like rimguard from that picture. Maybe it's a mixture of windshield washer fluid and rimguard?

I would not expect the rim to rust there if it was rusting from the inside.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

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Well I think it’s definitively solved. I called the John Deere dealer who sold this tractor to my coworker and they said they used a local tire shop and calcium chloride until 2016 when they switched to beet juice. My tractor is a 2012 so it’s calcium chloride.

Local tire shop that fills tractor tires said if I bring in the wheels or the tractor they can remove the fluid and clean rim and re mount for $30 each. I might see if they can apply some rust treatment at the same time on the inside while they are at it for insurance. Does anyone have anything to suggest to spray the insides with, which I assume will be a little rusty after 7 years with this stuff in there?
 

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The CC did not cause that rust, my 4110 wheels started doing the same after 8 or so years.
 

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Rim corrosion is minor on outside, was going to touch up this when the cold arrives in the fall. If the fluid is calcium chloride I would fear it’s rust showing from inside though which would be really bad I would guess?

Please tell me I am over reacting and this is just beet juice haha
You're over reacting.

It's not beet juice.

What is done is done. Calcium chloride is in your tires, as it it with many thousand other tires.

I would be more concerned removing the CC and actually being able to get it all cleaned off.

I am thinking that the rims will last longer if left alone and properly filled than they will if it is removed.

I'd just make sure they are filled to the valve stem at 12:00 which keeps 99% of the metal submerged.

Keep the rims clean and make sure the stems don't leak. If they do, address it then.

FWIW, Beet Juice has its own issues as well.

Till then, Tractor On.
 

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You're over reacting.

It's not beet juice.

What is done is done. Calcium chloride is in your tires, as it it with many thousand other tires.

I would be more concerned removing the CC and actually being able to get it all cleaned off.

I am thinking that the rims will last longer if left alone and properly filled than they will if it is removed.

I'd just make sure they are filled to the valve stem at 12:00 which keeps 99% of the metal submerged.

Keep the rims clean and make sure the stems don't leak. If they do, address it then.

FWIW, Beet Juice has its own issues as well.

Till then, Tractor On.


Fair enough. I almost always over react when it comes to these types of things... I am "ver particular" when it comes to my cars/tractors/etc and each small issue (real or imagined) bothers me.

I will leave it through the summer at a minimum. I had planned to address the small spots of rust starting anyways so I will do some reading to see if folks have tips about changing out of calcium chloride (rim coating or something else to protect rim) that will make me feel confident in removing the fluid and not having any rust issues. Honestly one of the big reasons I am leaning towards still taking it out is to remove the ballast (weight) as I already have a box blade with weights and a backhoe that I can use as functional ballast. Ever couple hundred pounds of weight I can take off this tractor will mean a little less impact on my grass when I drive around the yard.


Appreciate all of the input, you guys have put my mind at ease on this subject.
 

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Fair enough. I almost always over react when it comes to these types of things... I am "very particular" when it comes to my cars/tractors/etc and each small issue (real or imagined) bothers me.
I can be the same way and every so often I have to take a chill pill or someone hits me over the head with a 2x4.

Sometimes they just break a good 2x4. :lol:

If you are wanting to loose the weight, maybe you can find someone that wants the weight and swap with them.
 

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I have "tested" the fluid more than a dozen times,,
if it is bitter (not salty, bitter) it is calcium chloride (put a little on your finger, and touch it to your tongue,, it will not harm you)
If it smells like alcohol,, it is methanol
Most of us can recognize antifreeze,,

So,, some say beet juice is sweet?? I have not run into that,,, yet,,, :dunno:
 

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I have "tested" the fluid more than a dozen times,,
if it is bitter (not salty, bitter) it is calcium chloride (put a little on your finger, and touch it to your tongue,, it will not harm you)
If it smells like alcohol,, it is methanol
Most of us can recognize antifreeze,,

So,, some say beet juice is sweet?? I have not run into that,,, yet,,, :dunno:
Hmm...sugar beets? :unknown:
 
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