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With the impending winter I know a lot of us have been pondering whether we need chains when plowing with our SCUTs. Just curious if anyone is using any of the "alternative" traction products.

I'm anticipating needing... something but, I'm not thrilled with what I expect to happen to my driveway if I throw chains on my 2032R.

Deere markets their "Terragrips" for lawn tractors but they don't carry anything like that for the SCUTs. But I did find a company that does. Rubbertirechains.com carries the same product as the Terragrip but in a bunch of additional sizes. And these are about half the cost ($198 incl shipping) of standard steel chains. ($360 w/shipping)

Has anyone played with these? Views? Opinions? Wild guesses? :laugh:
 

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Just an observation dosed with simple logic... Rubber chains is simply adding "AG Tread" strapped onto your "whatever tread" tires. It is well known that Ag's and R4's are only slightly better IN SNOW than turfs. Turfs are useless without chains and Ag's and R4's are only slightly better thus the only way to go is steel on pavement for every tire.

If you are worried about the driveway finish or re-coating (paint:laugh:) simply keep wheel spin to an absolute minimum in all situations. Use the 4WD plus "Rear End Lock" in gear when plowing and judge the amount of tire slip against the amount of snow the machine is pushing. If it slips... push less snow per pass.

Manuvering in tight spots to turn around, unlock the RE locker and if you can manage, unlock the 4wd until you get straight(er) for the next pass. The larger the turning radius, the less chains will mark pavement. (All bets are off with "lugged link" chains, I have never used them other than on a car, they must be real "pavement coating eaters"!) I don't care on my own "worn out" black top, but I'm damned carful with the neighbors especially one where I have to back uphill. "Straight, RE Locked and 4WD IN." Same for backblading away from buildings, etc...

I just can't see rubber traction aids except for possibly 2WD passenger cars and even then properly adjusted chains will be far more useful and safer including the "cable" type. Mine go on when it starts to look like continuous freezing conditions and I take them off when the sun warms my neck in the spring, I don't mess with "off and on" chains all winter.

Experiment! See what it takes to do your plowing and what your machine wants to keep it from spinning. It may take you a couple extra passes (extra seat time!) or higher plowing speed (watch that snow fly!)... Experiment!:good2:
 

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With the impending winter I know a lot of us have been pondering whether we need chains when plowing with our SCUTs. Just curious if anyone is using any of the "alternative" traction products.

I'm anticipating needing... something but, I'm not thrilled with what I expect to happen to my driveway if I throw chains on my 2032R.

Deere markets their "Terragrips" for lawn tractors but they don't carry anything like that for the SCUTs. But I did find a company that does. Rubbertirechains.com carries the same product as the Terragrip but in a bunch of additional sizes. And these are about half the cost ($198 incl shipping) of standard steel chains. ($360 w/shipping)

Has anyone played with these? Views? Opinions? Wild guesses? :laugh:
I have used "rubbertirechains" on my 455(with snow blade).....on my blacktop driveway. For me, on my driveway, in icy conditions, they got very slippery. Yes they protect the driveway, but in freezing rain, sleet and then snow they became a PITA!!!!! My driveway is slightly sloped which made things worse. I have used rear tire chains on my 1026R with a 54 inch snowblower and have had no problems. Yes, if I am not careful,
I can leave slight chain marks on my driveway. I can live with that.
 

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I'll go along with the others. I feel ice will be your enemy. Steel chains may mark up your driveway, but they will help on the ice. I doubt the rubber chains will do much good on ice. :snow:
 

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I'll go along with the others. I feel ice will be your enemy. Steel chains may mark up your driveway, but they will help on the ice. I doubt the rubber chains will do much good on ice. :snow:
I concur! I have a horseshoe drive and both sides climb uphill.... chains are King! Never had an issue with making the drive. Ice, well who goes out during an ice storm?
 

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Agree with the others ,,use steel chains. I only had one pair of JD chains, they lasted me maybe 2 seasons. After that took regular v and bar type car chains and made my own. I've only had one cross link to break or wear out in the past 12 years and believe me they get used. Every time out is a minimum of 2-3 hrs and sometimes all day.
Yes , over the past 40 + yrs of living at my house and plowing my sloped driveway if I spin the wheels you may see some marks on the concrete but nothing of concern. On asphalt again if I try to take a full blade and the snow is 24" deep and wheel or wheels spins again yes a few marks ,but again nothing to worry about, Next time the drive is coated you never know if or where the marks were, so again no concern.
When rubber tire chains first came out a telephone company administrator in charge of our vehicles decided we would switch from steel chains to the new rubber chains and then even the steel cable chains ,,what a PIA . Didn't matter if we were driving around town or out in the country . We was hung up, had more accidents , sliding down hills with these chains on . You would apply your brake to go down a hill , even use low gear and if the the rear tires would slide chains made the vehicle into a big skate board...... SAME YOUR MONEY not yelling just saying.. don't buy them .

Buy steel chains , use them try not to spin your tires and at the end of the winter you'll be safe and your driveway will look fine .
 

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I put steel chains on our 2320 in 2008, haven't taken them off yet. Ran steel chains on the 650 for 20 some years before that. I have never had any issues with damage to the driveway.
 

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I have a little 318 and last winter even with R1 tires I could not go anywhere. I purchased a set from tirechains.com and they have been on ever since. I have a gravel drive put park in a garage with a cement floor and have no issues.


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I guess I'm just lucky, but my driveway is level. I don't use chains at all, and had no trouble plowing out my driveway with 4wd.
 

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Me too. I have a hill at the end of our lane. I plowed almost a quarter mile of road last year every time it snowed. I seriously didn't even spin a tire. Maybe it's cause it is all gravel ?? Either way, we had up to 12" storms with 2' deep drifts that I was shoving my 83" front blade thru. I do have my 3005 loaded down a bit with rear ballast and RimGuard rear tires. I expect I'm well over 4000 lbs.

Jim
 

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I concur! I have a horseshoe drive and both sides climb uphill.... chains are King! Never had an issue with making the drive. Ice, well who goes out during an ice storm?[/QUOTE]

Last year here in the Hudson Valley of NY we had 2 storms nearly back to back of 11"-14" of snow AND a bunch of sleet and freezing rain in the middle of them. My neighbor needed to go to work early AM and I was out there plowing his driveway in rain freezing on the snow cleared black top. Pretty nasty weather even in my Gore Tex "cab"!:laugh:

I guess that was one time I could have used the "lug type" cross links, but I hope not to have that situation too often. I'll be ordering two extra cross links from Tirechains.com myself right soon, the 26X12X12 official JD Chinese chains need one extra each side to fill the end gaps.
 

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I concur! I have a horseshoe drive and both sides climb uphill.... chains are King! Never had an issue with making the drive. Ice, well who goes out during an ice storm?[/QUOTE]

Last year here in the Hudson Valley of NY we had 2 storms nearly back to back of 11"-14" of snow AND a bunch of sleet and freezing rain in the middle of them. My neighbor needed to go to work early AM and I was out there plowing his driveway in rain freezing on the snow cleared black top. Pretty nasty weather even in my Gore Tex "cab"!:laugh:

I guess that was one time I could have used the "lug type" cross links, but I hope not to have that situation too often. I'll be ordering two extra cross links from Tirechains.com myself right soon, the 26X12X12 official JD Chinese chains need one extra each side to fill the end gaps.
Like you we may get a dry powder snow if really cold one day and the next day get a very wet snow with freezing temps. Of course then everything under this turns ice . With helping the neighbors and their drive there are 2 close to level the rest slopes , 3 concrete, a couple asphalt , rest gravel and all slick as can be. I would rather have the chains for those times and set spinning the wheels ,sliding down a drive or shoveling my self out .
 

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