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Discussion Starter #1
My handyman business is starting to take off! If my partner and I can keep busy durring the winter, we will have the money to expand our tool inventory this spring and a TLB would help us with landscaping and other projects. We aren't looking to get into the excavation business, just something to make life easier; moving pallets, digging trenches, moving dirt, light demolition, etc. I was wondering if yous guys had any advice or recomendations for me as far as models to look at or things to look for in general. We may go new or used depending on what interest rates are next year.

The biggest requirement is that the whole machine can't weigh more than 5,000 pounds.
 

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I'd look for a 110TLB. It's basically a yellow 4 series tractor with a loader and hoe painted yellow.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Those 110's are a lot nicer than the old 440 we looked at on Friday!

Were the 110 TLB 's ever offered with a gear transmission? I've used hydrostatic tractors before but I'm just not sure im convinced that they are good for anything besides lawn mowing. How many models back do I have to go before I get to a small TLB with a shuttle shift?
 

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Hydrostatic transmissions can be found in large bulldozers and other large pieces of equipment. Not only are they easy to operate, they are fairly easy to maintain and are darn reliable. The only issues reported with the eHydro found on the 110 TLB has been when something has physically damaged the transmission wiring. Failures just aren't that common.
 

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The 110's where hydro only, they had a great reliability record but many did suffer from broken bell housings where the loader mounts, most often because the bolts got loose and/or never properly torqued. It was/is a commercial/contractor grade machine marketed to smaller contractors and it could be towed with a pickup truck. The Kubota equivalent would be the L39 or the L45. And Yanmar has the EX450TLB.

As Jason wrote, hydrostatic trannies are in everything nowadays and have been for-40 years in dozers, track hoes, heavy dumps, and other large equipment.
 

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You won't be under 5000 with a 110 more like 7500.
I hate to utter these words but here goes, look at the Kubota B26. Should be just about the weight you're after.

Matt
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yea, weight is an important factor. If the machine was really worth it I could push my luck and go for something that weighs 6000 pounds, but 7500 is too much. I'd be willing to consider a Kubota, but only if there are no other JD options. Nothing against Kubota but if I'm going to get something orange, I'd rather have an Allis-Chalmers. A lot of my customers are retired GM workers and have a "made in America or it's a pile junk and you are too" complex. I know better... It's just an image thing.

It wouldn't be construction yellow, but what about something from the 3 series? How tough are they?

Anything in yellow that might be older and lighter?
 

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Yea, weight is an important factor. If the machine was really worth it I could push my luck and go for something that weighs 6000 pounds, but 7500 is too much. I'd be willing to consider a Kubota, but only if there are no other JD options. Nothing against Kubota but if I'm going to get something orange, I'd rather have an Allis-Chalmers. A lot of my customers are retired GM workers and have a "made in America or it's a pile junk and you are too" complex. I know better... It's just an image thing.

It wouldn't be construction yellow, but what about something from the 3 series? How tough are they?

Anything in yellow that might be older and lighter?
I previously owned a 3320 with 448 hoe and it was a good machine. I wouldn't consider it anywhere near HD for commercial use though.
The B26 I suggested is a commercial grade tlb. I think the 3 series( 4 series too) have the weak link being the removable loader.
I didn't realize just how stough the loader on my 110 TLB is compared to the detachable loader on both the 3 and 4 series.

I did do a little "side work" with the 3320 but it involved mostly brush hogging. My gut feeling is the 3 series would hold up well to light grading(BB or LP) or hogging raking work but would likely suffer from commercial dirt work.

Matt
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I figured the detachable loader and hoe would be weak spots. I admit it would be nice to have a newer and more powerful machine to take some of the workload away from my 65 year old model M in terms of brush hogging and snow plowing, but I think I'd rather have a dedicated TLB instead of a multi-purpose machine.

I'll look into the Kubota. If I can get a new machine with a warantee then I might as well. Just the same, I'm going to keep looking for something a bit older and inexpensive. Low costs make for higher profits.
 

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JD has gotten out of the small contractor class machine when they ended the 110TLB run. I suspect the downturn in the economy had something to do with it although it was a dated platform, but they didn't replace it. Kubota has the market share here...
 

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As Kenny said Deere basically gave this segment to Kubota. I never really understood why the 110 never evolved( even though Kubota hasn't really changed their tlb line much either) as it was solid platform that could have been improved vastly by more hp and a cab with a little instrumentation. Which would have been a small redesign. It's not as if you could get into a new 4 series from less.

Matt
 
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