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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This is a video coming in my subdivision and coming up my driveway. I would probably scrape a good portion of this road if the snow is under 6". Should I buy the 1.5" wheels spacers so I can use chains? I know some say you can do it without wheel spacers but I'd rather not deal with worrying if something is rubbing. You guys are always awesome and make so many good suggestions it really reduces my "live and learn" decisions which usually leads to spending more money.



1025R
 

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Chains will chew the crap out of the blacktop finish. You won't need chains if you properly ballast. I have never had chains on my tractor and our roads have a 9 degree grade....you might still want the spacers for stability. Personally, I think you should try the Terra Grips first. You will be shocked at the damage to the asphalt surface regular chains will do and if someone says "Well, then don't spin the tires", they obviously haven't plowed much snow.....sometimes, it can't be avoided.

I am going to bet you add power angling after a few times plowing........It's so much faster and safer to be able to put the snow where it's best. Looking at the video, the snow should be on one side of the road and then the other and you have to REALLY be careful about knowing exactly where the drop off edge is or you will have a very unpleasant ride, possibly a rollover.

With the drop off along side your roads, you have to push the snow completely off the road or its going to be down to one lane in a hurry......

Let me also tell you that plowing the roads is painfully slow on the tractor. I know, you have time and will enjoy the seat time, but it becomes a matter of practicality. If I were you and knowing what I know about plowing snow with these machines, I wouldn't committ to plowing the road and driveways until you have done it. Its going to take longer than you think..........much longer......

I have my plowing route down to a science, every single move is carefully planned for maximum efficiency. I plow about 1,200 feet of roads and our roads are 36 feet wide and my plow is 87" wide and along with the 22 driveways I plow, it takes me at least 3 hours. 3 Hours per plow outing is a LOT of time in the seat when its below freezing. I usually start between 2:30am and 3:30am, depending upon the snowfall and day of the week.
 

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This is a video coming in my subdivision and coming up my driveway. I would probably scrape a good portion of this road if the snow is under 6". Should I buy the 1.5" wheels spacers so I can use chains? I know some say you can do it without wheel spacers but I'd rather not deal with worrying if something is rubbing. You guys are always awesome and make so many good suggestions it really reduces my "live and learn" decisions which usually leads to spending more money.



1025R
your gonna plow the whole subdivision? Hope your getting compansation for the use of your equipment and time. I'm not familiar with your location but i have had my time in the snow and ice and can remember more than once when barely moviung and then the tractor just starts sliding out of control down hill. That will only happen on a hard road surface like asphalt and will never happen with chains or on dirt and damage to asphalt is not hard to repair, besides safety first remember
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Chains will chew the crap out of the blacktop finish. You won't need chains if you properly ballast. I have never had chains on my tractor and our roads have a 9 degree grade....you might still want the spacers for stability. Personally, I think you should try the Terra Grips first. You will be shocked at the damage to the asphalt surface regular chains will do and if someone says "Well, then don't spin the tires", they obviously haven't plowed much snow.....sometimes, it can't be avoided.

I am going to bet you add power angling after a few times plowing........It's so much faster and safer to be able to put the snow where it's best. Looking at the video, the snow should be on one side of the road and then the other and you have to REALLY be careful about knowing exactly where the drop off edge is or you will have a very unpleasant ride, possibly a rollover.

With the drop off along side your roads, you have to push the snow completely off the road or its going to be down to one lane in a hurry......

Let me also tell you that plowing the roads is painfully slow on the tractor. I know, you have time and will enjoy the seat time, but it becomes a matter of practicality. If I were you and knowing what I know about plowing snow with these machines, I wouldn't committ to plowing the road and driveways until you have done it. Its going to take longer than you think..........much longer......

I have my plowing route down to a science, every single move is carefully planned for maximum efficiency. I plow about 1,200 feet of roads and our roads are 36 feet wide and my plow is 87" wide and along with the 22 driveways I plow, it takes me at least 3 hours. 3 Hours per plow outing is a LOT of time in the seat when its below freezing. I usually start between 2:30am and 3:30am, depending upon the snowfall and day of the week.

Thank you, Sulleybear. Your knowledge on snow plowing is much appreciated. I do not plan to commit to anything the first year other than a few neighbors driveways and some pre-treatment. I do plan to assist on a few of the roads just to get an understanding of what I may want to commit to in the future. The complete subdivision is 2.2 miles long, most of the roads being 16' wide with the exception of a few intersections that are large flat areas. I don't think I want to do anything that time consuming, my day job would prevent that. I would rather not even consider chains but was just concerned on some of the steeper areas.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
your gonna plow the whole subdivision? Hope your getting compansation for the use of your equipment and time. I'm not familiar with your location but i have had my time in the snow and ice and can remember more than once when barely moviung and then the tractor just starts sliding out of control down hill. That will only happen on a hard road surface like asphalt and will never happen with chains or on dirt and damage to asphalt is not hard to repair, besides safety first remember
I wouldn't commit to the entire subdivision. It would be difficult to commit that much time, the subdivision is 2.2 miles long. I will mostly do driveways where a smaller tractor can do a cleaner job and do less damage.
 

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Personally, I'd opt to have a set of chains available.

I bought my tractor in May 2014 and bought chains that fall figuring I'd use them to plow. The first storm came before I ever got them on and I found I didn't need them. The chains sat in my garage until this past winter. We got one good storm that dumped 10" of slush and I just couldn't keep the wheels from spinning enough to move anything. After 4 hours of fighting and only getting 1/2 way done, I pulled in to the garage and put the chains on. 20 minutes of plowing with the chains on and I was done. They do mark up asphalt a little but I prefer to have them if I need them.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Admin, I apologize I just now figured out this should be in another thread other than SCUT. Sorry, I'm learning.
 

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Personally I'd buy a plow for the truck and make short work of that and easily plow the whole subdivision from the comfort of your heated truck. You could easily pay for the plow setup in a single season. My driveway is 170 feet long and 4 cars wide. The only thing I would consider using the tractor for would be stacking snow if we had too much. I could see my driveway probably taking a couple hours on the tractor vs about 20 minutes in the truck. I've been plowing commercial lots for a contractor now for about 15 years. $90 per hour to sit in my truck with all the amenities is easy money. I bought a used setup for my last truck, plowed with it for 10 years and sold it for what I paid when I bought this truck.


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Discussion Starter #9
Personally I'd buy a plow for the truck and make short work of that and easily plow the whole subdivision from the comfort of your heated truck. You could easily pay for the plow setup in a single season. My driveway is 170 feet long and 4 cars wide. The only thing I would consider using the tractor for would be stacking snow if we had too much. I could see my driveway probably taking a couple hours on the tractor vs about 20 minutes in the truck. I've been plowing commercial lots for a contractor now for about 15 years. $90 per hour to sit in my truck with all the amenities is easy money. I bought a used setup for my last truck, plowed with it for 10 years and sold it for what I paid when I bought this truck.


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Nice setup. I just do this for fun and to help neighbors out. I work 55 hours a week already....lol.
 

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A truck would simply be a more efficient way to accomplish your task. (And warmer! Haha!)

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When I plow, I usually have about 350 to 400 pounds of rear ballast, plus I have the cab which weighs 400 pounds. I have gone as high as 700+ on the 3ph when the conditions get icy. I add ballast by piling on more 50# snow melt bags, which I will likely be using on icy conditions. Using snow melt and your machine is an entire other discussion we need to have, so we can do that in another thread.

Other than on sheer ice, the ballast is the biggest factor in moving wet heavy snow. Frankly, when its sheer ice, chains will help some, but you have to be SUPER careful even getting on and off the tractor or you can take a wicked fall. We had 3 ice storms this winter, which is unusual for us. Sheer ice just sucks to be on and you have to take it easy. Get snow melt spread as quickly as possible and let it work and it makes plowing much, much easier and safer.

Also, if you are home and getting slammed with a snow storm of wet crappy snow, go out in it and work the storm as its falling. Its much easier to be proactive than reactive to such situations. That's also a topic for yet another thread........
 

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Thank you, Sulleybear. Your knowledge on snow plowing is much appreciated. I do not plan to commit to anything the first year other than a few neighbors driveways and some pre-treatment. I do plan to assist on a few of the roads just to get an understanding of what I may want to commit to in the future. The complete subdivision is 2.2 miles long, most of the roads being 16' wide with the exception of a few intersections that are large flat areas. I don't think I want to do anything that time consuming, my day job would prevent that. I would rather not even consider chains but was just concerned on some of the steeper areas.
DO you know what I am referring to when I mentioned Terra Grips? This is actually the size you would need. Not quite as good as chains, considerably less damaging than chains.............It does take getting used to as at first, it feels like you have octagon shaped wheels but once you get used to them you don't even notice it.

TerraGrips Tire Chains 24x12-12 ST90009 for sale online | eBay


This link is to the manufacturers website.

Superior-Tech | Rubber Tire Chains
 

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Don’t you got a heated cab Sully?


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Discussion Starter #14
When I plow, I usually have about 350 to 400 pounds of rear ballast, plus I have the cab which weighs 400 pounds. I have gone as high as 700+ on the 3ph when the conditions get icy. I add ballast by piling on more 50# snow melt bags, which I will likely be using on icy conditions. Using snow melt and your machine is an entire other discussion we need to have, so we can do that in another thread.

Other than on sheer ice, the ballast is the biggest factor in moving wet heavy snow. Frankly, when its sheer ice, chains will help some, but you have to be SUPER careful even getting on and off the tractor or you can take a wicked fall. We had 3 ice storms this winter, which is unusual for us. Sheer ice just sucks to be on and you have to take it easy. Get snow melt spread as quickly as possible and let it work and it makes plowing much, much easier and safer.

Also, if you are home and getting slammed with a snow storm of wet crappy snow, go out in it and work the storm as its falling. Its much easier to be proactive than reactive to such situations. That's also a topic for yet another thread........

I have a few concerns about spreading snow melt, my first consideration was buying the broadcast spreader and using the salt as my desired ballast but I've heard a lot of negativity about spreading salt with the tractor. I'm very OCD and I would pressure wash immediately after each use but I still don't want to induce any preventable damage to my machine. I would like to here what you think about that. I also have the option of using a boom sprayer and spraying brine.


I did look up the terragrips you suggested. I was going to take some time to research them more to understand how they work and how they compare to chains.
 

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SulleyBear nailed it.
You have a beautiful road that you all spent alot of money for.
Why would you even consider scarring it up with chains?
I guarantee that your neighbors would ***** about the damage to the road, and rightfully so.

Those suggesting a truck/plow are correct.
If you were to do that road with a tractor, you'd want a front mount blower, but a truck would be most efficient.
 

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Personally if it was my machine.

Swap out the tires for HDAP. Plenty of people have done this with 1 Series. Fluid fill the rear tires to load them. Even if you just use winter rated washer fluid but I don't know how available that is in your area or how cold it is. Rim guard is better but more money.

Then look at rear ballast which you should have anyhow with a FEL.

No way I would spread salt with my tractor. Sure you can say you would pressure wash it off until you don't. Besides it is more than just the top and fender wells. You would want to get everything.

If you are looking at chains I would go with the rubber ones that were mentioned. I would still recommend HDAP tires over that route. Less messing around with to put them on/off and they provide much better traction in the summer as well without being too hard on the road.

I don't know how much snow you normally get there but something like that with a hydraulically angling blade would do the trick. 2 miles is a lot of road but like you said you are not going to commit to that, just a few driveways which is what I do. I would be willing to bet we get a lot more snow than you do and this works fine for me. The only time I do the blower is if we get dumped on with wet heavy snow. That is 12" or more. Even if we are getting that much I normally go out mid snow storm and plow every 6" or so. Sometimes work gets in the way of that and that is when I drop the blade and pickup the blower.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Personally if it was my machine.

Swap out the tires for HDAP. Plenty of people have done this with 1 Series. Fluid fill the rear tires to load them. Even if you just use winter rated washer fluid but I don't know how available that is in your area or how cold it is. Rim guard is better but more money.

Then look at rear ballast which you should have anyhow with a FEL.

No way I would spread salt with my tractor. Sure you can say you would pressure wash it off until you don't. Besides it is more than just the top and fender wells. You would want to get everything.

If you are looking at chains I would go with the rubber ones that were mentioned. I would still recommend HDAP tires over that route. Less messing around with to put them on/off and they provide much better traction in the summer as well without being too hard on the road.

I don't know how much snow you normally get there but something like that with a hydraulically angling blade would do the trick. 2 miles is a lot of road but like you said you are not going to commit to that, just a few driveways which is what I do. I would be willing to bet we get a lot more snow than you do and this works fine for me. The only time I do the blower is if we get dumped on with wet heavy snow. That is 12" or more. Even if we are getting that much I normally go out mid snow storm and plow every 6" or so. Sometimes work gets in the way of that and that is when I drop the blade and pickup the blower.
I read a thread on here about those tires. They look impressive.
 

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I meant to say the HDAP tires are not too hard on the grass. They won't be hard on the road either like chains would be. They are a great option for snow traction as well. I don't get why they are an option on the X7xx machines but not on 1 Series. The only reason I can think of is if maybe the load rating isn't as much as your R# tires that they always offer. I don't have a 1 Series so I don't follow it all that close but I want to say there is a HDAP tire that fits the 1 series and has enough ply and load rating the be as good or really close to OEM.

I guess the one benefit to spacers though is your ares looks pretty hilly and it might give a bit more stability.
 

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I have always used vbar tire chains before my 1025. I already have a set made and ready to go this winter. Years of pulling in and out of the garage on the cement floor has left no marks. Driveways are gravel but I travel maybe 100yards on the asphalt road and can't say I ever noticed any marks. I make my chains out of big truck tire chains so maybe because they are 3/8inch chain they don't damage like smaller chain?
 
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