Green Tractor Talk banner

81 - 88 of 88 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
540 Posts
It seems like there are basically three types of equipment owners and GTT members;

Type 1. - "Oh no, the manual says I need to change my break in oil at 8 hours and it's now 7.6 hours and I need to mow and it takes me over an hour to mow. If I don't change my engine oil now, it's going to be over the 8 hours when I change it and I really don't want to go over the recommended hours of service. But if I change it before it reaches 8 hours, maybe I haven't given the engine proper break in time"..

They stress and fret over the service, or at least it "bothers them"..............These are the people who actually fret over whether the 0w-30w is best for winter use or should they stick with the 5w-40w for higher viscosity for warmer weather....They are very concerned about doing things correctly and chances are they don't have an arrest record...:laugh: They also pay their bills as soon as they get them in the mail so there is no chance they are ever late with any payments.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Type 2. - "Service? Hmmm, well it seems to be running fine now and it probably hasn't been that long, plus I don't have the time. I will see it's done next week (month, year....). Plus, I don't know where the manual is, but it doesn't matter because I never read it anyways."" ......Percentage of the population like this........definitely the majority, but a minority of GTT members are this way as most like this don't bother to spend the time to learn about their equipment so they surely wouldn't spend time on a forum like GTT with one exception.

They are the ones who make their first post when the machine is broken or failing and they get some suggestions and we never hear from them again, or at least until the next failure. They also usually never post any follow up or what they found from the advice given. When it doesn't work, call the man......Pay their bills on or past the due date and then dispute and fight late payment charges when they do appear because they have an excuse or reason.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Type 3. - "Regular service intervals per the owners manual." They keep a record of their machines service needs, it could be in writing, electronically or they have stickers on their machines when the next service is due. Some might write the hours on the filter when they change it. They are in tune with their machine's service, very organized but also aren't lying awake at night stressing that they are at 198.8 hours and it's snowing outside and they need to plow snow, which takes a few hours and they are coming up on their 200 hour service. They know the machine doesn't self destruct when it passes the recommended service interval by a few hours. After all, the machine can't see the hour meter without a mirror......:lol:

These people most likely own a Technical Service Manual for their equipment. They have also likely read the owners manual, some more than once. They can put their hands on the original owners manual for their 20 year old John Deere just as they can do the same for their new equipment. They understand the importance of machine maintenance and they also understand how to service their machines. Most do their own service work, but some send it out to someone they trust because of time, they can't get under the machine as easily as they once did or they have enough to do and just don't have the time to get to it themselves, but they will see the service occurs and is properly done.

These people pay their bills so the vendor will receive and process their payments on or before the bills due date. They are rarely late but if they happen to be, it's not the end of the world.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

How these three groups are represented here on GTT and in the general population.

Type 1. - Percentage of the general population like this......2% or less, but probably 11% of the GTT members

Type 2. - Percentage of the general population like this.....85% or more, but probably 5% of the GTT members

Type 3. - Percentage of the general population like this.....13% (+ or -), but probably 84% of the GTT members

Hey, it's just one more reality which makes life interesting and exciting..........:good2:

All percentages were determined with a highly scientific process after careful analysis of the member data.

Ok, actually, it's merely my SWAG.......(Simple Wild @$$ Guess)
I've always heard that a SWAG was a Scientific Wild A$$ Guess.

Anyways, I do my maintenance differently based on the machine.

I pretty much follow JD manual on my Tractor. I don't fret if I go over by 10% on hours. I don't buy JD engine oil, I'll buy another decent oil and thats good enough.

I have a almost 50 year old Wheelhorse law tractor, a C-160, that only gets maintenance when it needs it. It isn't long for the world. Over a year ago I broke the piston in the engine while pulling a drag for long periods of time. Buy new piston and put it in engine, no boring, no honing of cylinder, just slap the new piston in the old worn cylinder and go. Its still running.

This spring one of the rear wheels started spinning on the axle. Key worked it way loose and carved up the hub. My fix, new key, file out nasties in hub and on axle and its back together working. No new hub or cutting a new key slot on the axle.

I stopped changing the engine oil on it several years back, never have changed the differential oil but I do occasionally grease the zerks.

I know the engine on the Wheelhorse will out last the rest of the tractor. The front end is horribly worn. Lots of wobble on the wheels.

Nothing lasts forever if its used. Gotta at some point say its not worth changing the oil every year if the rest of it is on life support.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,134 Posts
There was a tractor for sale on line and yesterday when I was looking at the pictures, the guy had on the dash, right next to the hour meter location, a typed label for the next machine service.

Only problem was his label said "Chagne Oil at 1,254 huors"

He did spell "at" and "oil" right, though.........:laugh::lol:
Clearly a Type-1.

Perhaps we should start listing “Type” in our signature.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
363 Posts
This is why you do not want to let you hydraulic oil get contaminated in the first place.

I agree, having the differential sump as the hydraulic reservoir is not the best design, but it is what tractor manufacturers do. Concerning the metal chips. The large chips are caught by the suction strainer, which if left go will eventually block the suction strainer. Dropping the oil and pulling and cleaning the suction strainer is so the system does not cavitate. These large pieces do not whirl through the system. If they did, your hydraulic system wouldn't last 10 hours.

Good point on using accessories. If you have an accessory that you got used and do not know the condition of the hydraulic oil in the cylinders, then what you should do is, hook up one hose, remove the quick connect on the other hose and put it in a bucket. Cycle the cylinder and waste the oil coming out of the cylinder. When the cylinders are at full stroke in this direction, put the quick connect back on the waste line and remove the quick connect on the other line and put this one in the bucket. Now cycle the cylinder the other way, wasting the oil coming out of the cylinders. Now you know you have all clean oil in the cylinders from your tractor. Refill the tractor reservoir and connect the accessory. I would never connect an accessory to my tractor that I didn't know what type of oil or condition of the oil is in the cylinders.

This is true in every hydraulic system ever built. This is why you do not want to let your hydraulic system get contaminated to start with. Once contaminated oil gets cycled through your hydraulic system. It is no small task to get all of the contaminates out of the system.

Some system filters do have magnets in them so you thought about magnets is already used. On the one series, the suction strainer has magnets on the inside of the suction strainer. These are to catch the small particles that get through the strainer screen. Another reason to pull the suction strainer. Clean the magnets so they remain effective. Concerning water, once you determine there is water (milky oil) in you hydraulic oil, it is too late. Your system now has water contaminated oil throughout the system which is the number one cause of hydraulic component failure. So, the oil must be changed routinely to minimize the amount of moisture in the system. Yes, it is impossible to keep all moisture out of the hydraulic oil although, if you keep the oil changed, the moisture in the system will continually be evacuated and the remaining moisture will be minimized. The other thing that will aid in moisture removal is simply running the tractor to create heat in the oil.
Another fluid that is hard to fix once it is bad is coolant. If you don't flush it some old coolant will remain. If you do flush it some water that is not distilled will remain. And if you wait too long there may be corrosion. Some of that will remain even with A flush. Engine oil is one of few fluids that is almost completely replaced.

Sent from my QTAIR7 using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,321 Posts
Sulley, I didn’t want to quote your post for space reasons.
I truly believe that a site a good as this one brings awareness to some owners who would otherwise be less diligent.
Anyway, I’ve always done my services according to the manual with the exception of no longer listed 50 hr hydraulic service which I did. The only other exception is for greasing. The manual states every 10 hrs for wet conditions and every 50 hrs for normal. I simply grease it every 25 hrs, just easier for me to keep track of that way.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,134 Posts
Sully you clearly left out a bracket. The diesel mechanics
I was going to say the "engineers" but didn't want to risk getting flamed. :flag_of_truce:

:hide:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,497 Posts
Anyways, I do my maintenance differently based on the machine.

I pretty much follow JD manual on my Tractor. I don't fret if I go over by 10% on hours. I don't buy JD engine oil, I'll buy another decent oil and thats good enough.
Me too...follow the manual (roughly), seek and listen to my dealer/service manager's advice. Skeptical of internet opinions/advice. I'm no stranger to small engine equipment, rolling stock, and recreational OHV's, The maintenance concepts that I've evolved over several decades have worked well for me. When they stop working, well...never too old to change.
 

·
Old Pa-pa
Joined
·
11,736 Posts
Sulley, I didn’t want to quote your post for space reasons.
I truly believe that a site a good as this one brings awareness to some owners who would otherwise be less diligent.
Anyway, I’ve always done my services according to the manual with the exception of no longer listed 50 hr hydraulic service which I did. The only other exception is for greasing. The manual states every 10 hrs for wet conditions and every 50 hrs for normal. I simply grease it every 25 hrs, just easier for me to keep track of that way.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Same here, 25 hours is dang easy to remember, 25 hrs for Z Trak, IH 274 and 4066r.

The Deere recommended 50 hr. seems to long to me.

Dust and dirt worry me more than wet, even down here, but I do use JD *blue* high moisture environment Lithium grease on everything.
 
81 - 88 of 88 Posts
Top