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I'm normally a man who likes to keep it stock and factory original. When I purchased my X728 it was previously enjoyed by another. Which was perfect. I wanted to do and try things I would normally would not. Like I had a Cozy Cab installed on it. The machine already had some very minor scuffs in the paint so if the rubber seals scuffed it so, oh well.

Before I picked the X728 up, I also had the dealer install the larger alternator on it. I was concerned about the additional load on the electrical system with the 2-Speed heater blower motor, 2-speed wiper motor, 2-speed vent fan, and the dome light.

This summer I added four 3 watt amber emergency vehicle flashers. I programmed then and synchronized them to flash like the ones do on the corners of the roof of the real farm tractors. They look sweet and maybe I won't get pealed crossing town with the machine. I also installed a Pioneer radio that connects to my iPhone via bluetooth. Added two Kicker speakers. Very sweet. Then I decided that two 15 watt LED flood lamps mounted below the cab to shine under the snow thrower while transporting across town and to let me see 'behind' the headlights if you will.

So why not switch all the lighting (headlamps, back up and taillights) to LED? Reduce the total watt consumption of the electrical system to allow for the other accessories. Main reason of logic, the hood just does not open as easy with an aftermarket cab. And with the snow blower dangling off of the front, that's just more to work around to access the battery. As a side note, I did wire two 4 gage copper wires with the battery quick disconnect connector to the cab so in the event I need to charge it or boost it, I can do so calmly.

I found everything I needed at: superbrightleds.com. Except for the headlamps. The stock incandescent headlamps are a GE-894. They are widely used as driving/fog lamps in cars and headlamps in ATV's, tractors, etc. I found some in California and purchased them. Pretty Sweet at first. 7 watts each vs 38 watts each was a huge savings. Did not like them. While blowing the seasons first snow, they seem to make the snow flakes glow large and not penetrate through. Only used them 3 times and one is already burnt out. So the old lamps went back in today for the headlamps.

I found some CREE '50watt' LED replacements which actually draw 9 watts for $25 for the pair. Thinking I might give those a try.

Have anyone else experimented with LEDs? If so, whats your findings?
 

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Have anyone else experimented with LEDs? If so, whats your findings?
Installed two 2150 lumen LED floods on the front of my 997 Z Trak and two 1200 lumen floods on the ROP.
Got them from Northern Equipment, the 2150 Lumen ones were $80 a piece and the 1200 lumen ones
came in a pack of two for $80 for both.
Happy with them, very good coverage with the four.
Pretty solid units with an aluminum housing.

The 2150's pull 1.98 amps at 27 watts a piece.
The 1200's pull 1.28 amps at 18 watts a piece.
Have the power bus for all of them fused at 7 amps.
 

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I believe CREE is a brand of LED. Lots of higher end off road lights use them. Very nice. Usually kind of expensive, but well built.

-636
 

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I believe CREE is a brand of LED. Lots of higher end off road lights use them. Very nice. Usually kind of expensive, but well built.

-636
CREE makes the LED chips - the equal of a filament in an incandecent bulb.

Other manufacturer's then take those LED chips and make complete bulbs out of them. CREE doesn't make a complete automotive type bulb themselves (They do make some residential, commercial and industrial bulbs...)

Many people, myself included, consider CREE LEDs to be the industry "Gold Standard" for performance. That's why when other companies make bulbs with them, they advertise that point fairly heavily.
 

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I found some CREE '50watt' LED replacements which actually draw 9 watts for $25 for the pair. Thinking I might give those a try.

I'd recommend looking just a little bit deeper into those bulbs before you put your money out there. When they advertise that a bulb is a "50 watt" replacement, that doesn't really mean much.

Light output is measured in "Lumens" so see what the stock bulb is rated for as far as lumens goes and compare that to the ratings on any replacement.

My 2032R uses a standard "886" 50-watt halogen bulb for the headlights that is rated at 1,257 lumens. All of the cross-referenced LED replacements put out significantly less light. The highest rated replacement I could find is 750 lumens but most were in the 250-400 lumen range. So if I went with direct replacement LEDs I'd actually lose quite a bit of light output.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sorry for the clutter. My garage is getting rather full. I wanted to get some video of the tractor in action while blowing snow. My queen doesn't mind the toys but wasn't about to stand in the cold to film me.
 

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I found some CREE '50watt' LED replacements which actually draw 9 watts for $25 for the pair. Thinking I might give those a try.
A 50 watt LED light would be putting out 4000ish lumems. For $25 for a pair? Like Jim said, something is wrong with that discription..
 

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A 50 watt LED light would be putting out 4000ish lumems. For $25 for a pair? Like Jim said, something is wrong with that discription..

With his "50 watt" being in quotes I assumed he meant that they were advertising it as a "50 watt equivalent" i.e. the equal to a 50-watt incandescent - not that the LED bulb itself draws 50-watts.
 

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If you happen to be out in the sleet/snow, be aware that LED's can ice (slush) over easily [my jeep headlights are LED from truck-lite.com].
Then I have to find a place to stop and wipe them off.
They are massively brighter than stock lamps, but no where near as bright as HID (which I only use off-road for a search).
I never seem to go 'jeeping' in nice weather...
 

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You are correct Jim. The manufacture listed it as a '50 watt LED' They arrived at that by using ten (10) 5 watt Cree LED's in the lamp. The Cree website actually lists them at 3 watts a piece. Since LED's are completely different from incandescent which distributes light in a 360° pattern. LED's, depending on manufacture, refractor, reflector, and or lens, at best can only distribute light at 120°. I suspect the finial product depending on the driver etc may be somewhere between the 30 and 50 watt range.

Since John Deere does not give me the option of hi beam, low beam I do not want the headlights any brighter. I move snow often around 5 am so I do not want to blind oncoming traffic as I move across town to other driveways. And since I rarely move snow when it's sunny and 70°, blowing snow from nature and the machine itself is a very common occurrence. The Cozy Cab blocks the natural flow of air through the tractor so the hood and front of the machine stays pretty warm. Enough that blowing snow will not stick to the lights. Especially at the low ground speed that the machine travels at. I could see that being an issue traveling at higher speeds.

John Deere used to describe there machines as Weekend Freedom Machines. I guess to promote more leisure time instead of doing yard work. Ironic, as that is true, we spend lots of leisure time with our Deere's. As evident by forums like this and many others. It is relaxing to me to tune out the noise of my job, my parents chemo treatments, my wife's new normal with her new kidney and the changes associated with anti-rejection medications and the 15 pounds I gained after giving her my left kidney. I enjoy using my machines in all their many forms. My Calgon moment.

Lumens are one way we measure lights. It is one the most common ways, metric if you will to foot candles that I use more regularly as an electrician. There is CRI, Kelvins, V-A's (NEC Code talk) LUX, the old warm white, cool white, and daylight. Plus many more. You have ballast, drivers, contactors, switches of all styles, occupancy sensors, duel technology occupancy sensors, light harvesting sensors, and photo eyes. All which are mind numbing. And not the point I'm going for. Watts baby. I'm trying to save watts.

So my quest continues for just the right LED replacement. As pointed out, CREE does not make the entire auto style lamp. They do make outstanding architectural lights, both HID and now LED. I installed lots of different lights since the mid 80's and they are defiantly top shelve products. They also make some nice consumer oriented LED lamp replacements for home.
 

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Well now you're just going to confuse a lot of people that aren't in the electrical world.


Lumens are one way we measure lights. It is one the most common ways, metric if you will to foot candles that I use more regularly as an electrician.

Hmmm.... not really. "Lumens" is simply that total amount of light generated by a bulb. "Foot Candles" is concerned with getting that light onto a surface. You can play with foot candles by using things like reflectors and lenses to focus light to where you want it but you can't generate more lumens then a bulb is capable of producing.


There is CRI, Kelvins, V-A's (NEC Code talk) LUX, the old warm white, cool white, and daylight. Plus many more. You have ballast, drivers, contactors, switches of all styles, occupancy sensors, duel technology occupancy sensors, light harvesting sensors, and photo eyes. All which are mind numbing. And not the point I'm going for. Watts baby. I'm trying to save watts.
While there are thousands of differing terms involved with the lighting world, for the purposes of someone replacing a bulb in the headlamp on their tractor, almost all of these are irrelevant. In practical terms, most people would want to replace their existing bulb with a bulb that puts out roughly the same amount of light. In some cases, such as your's, they want to reduce the total wattage used.

To do that all they need to know is that the replacement bulb matches the style that they are replacing, generates lumens equal to their existing bulb and uses fewer watts.

Now, if they are going to replace the entire headlamp fixture (bulb, reflector, lens, etc...) some of these other factors can come into play but that doesn't seem to be what you were asking about.
 

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Now, if they are going to replace the entire headlamp fixture (bulb, reflector, lens, etc...) some of these other factors can come into play but that doesn't seem to be what you were asking about.
What I did with my 274 International tractor was put two auxiliary LED 2150 Lumen (each 27 Watts) on the rear fenders pointing forward and keep the stock high/low beam incandescents (each 55 Watts) as headlamps.
Also have another 2150 Lumen (27 Watt) on the rear of the right fender pointing backwards as a work light.
Modified their fixture mounts with a spring instead of just locking them down with a bolt alone so that I can swivel them,
but with enough spring holding power where they will stay fixed once manually adjusted.

The IH 274 only has a 15 Amp alternator and can handle all lights being on with no problem, so far.
Pretty sure the alternator wouldn't be able to handle that many lights if they were all incandescents plus keeping the
battery charged at low to medium RPM.
 

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I've got 6 of the 4" round 2150 lumen spot (30 degree spread) lights coming for my tractor. I figure with 4 forward, and 2 back, I should be able to see well enough in the dark to be safe doing just about anything but felling trees (I would NEVER do that under artificial lighting).

I had considered upgrading the stock lights to HID, but the issue of roading the tractor is a valid concern for me in the event I need to make a 7 mile trip (one way) around my block to deal with swamp trail construction issues. The 35W HID's I have on my atv are ridiculously bright, but they're also not very friendly for on-coming traffic. With a top speed of 17mph, I don't need to see that far down the road.

I also considered one of the higher power light bars that are available, but those limit my ability to tune the dispersion to the sides where I'm more likely to need light. I have an older 27W fixture which should be very similar to the new ones, and that light is very effective on it's own.
 
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