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A new truck is in my semi-near future, and I think I want to go smaller. I'm coming out of an older Tundra, and part of the compromise of downsizing is going to be getting nice utility trailer. This leads me to thinking that it would be great if I could hall the tractor on a rare occasion. I've been driving it down the road 4-5 miles occasionally and there are a couple other places I'd like to be able to take it.

Does anybody tow their tractor with a tacoma? What size trailer are you using?

Thanks
 

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I don't think you have anything to worry about. At only 1800 lbs. I could tow a 2025R with my Highlander and a landscape trailer.
 

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The Tacoma will have plenty of towing capacity. The trailer would require more thought IMO. Are you going to have an implement on the back, FEL on etc.. then you will need a trailer with slide out ramps, I know my tractor with FEL/bucket and my 60" rotary cutter is one long sun of gun. I wouldn't think twice about pulling mine with my Colorado and that's basically the same size truck.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The Tacoma will have plenty of towing capacity. The trailer would require more thought IMO. Are you going to have an implement on the back, FEL on etc.. then you will need a trailer with slide out ramps, I know my tractor with FEL/bucket and my 60" rotary cutter is one long sun of gun. I wouldn't think twice about pulling mine with my Colorado and that's basically the same size truck.
Yeah, I'm wondering about the size I need. I want to keep it down to single axle for weight purposes and the package gets pretty long. When I go places, I have: bucket, forks, york rake, and ballast box. I usually put the forks on the tractor and load the bucket in the bed of the truck. Then, the rake gets strapped to the forks and the ballast box stays in place. I drive that package down the road right now. But, the tacoma is too narrow, so it all needs to go on the trailer. I'm thinking a 14 footer, and with all the implements and the trailer, I think it starts to get heavy...
 

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I agree with Pat.
Depending on configuration, you may end up pretty long, and if the trailer is steel, that may end up being a limiting factor weight wise.
Aluminum trailers are great, light weight, etc, but limited in what you can add on, at least from my standpoint of being an amateur welder who doesnt weld aluminum anyway.

I was looking at an 18' trailer for mine, but may need to go 20 should I decide to do work with it, because Id need to haul a few implements at once, and thats hard to do on a small trailer.
As it sits now, my 2025 with backhoe will fit, barely, on a 12' single axle. I would not consider it safe to haul for any distance on the highway though. A tandem is just about a necessity at that size/weight.
Figure out what the biggest overall size of your tractor could be, and get the trailer based on that, if you dont already have one.
If you do, its a moot point, unless things change in the future.
 

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Yeah, I'm wondering about the size I need. I want to keep it down to single axle for weight purposes and the package gets pretty long. When I go places, I have: bucket, forks, york rake, and ballast box. I usually put the forks on the tractor and load the bucket in the bed of the truck. Then, the rake gets strapped to the forks and the ballast box stays in place. I drive that package down the road right now. But, the tacoma is too narrow, so it all needs to go on the trailer. I'm thinking a 14 footer, and with all the implements and the trailer, I think it starts to get heavy...
I know when I buy a trailer I'll have to measure with my rotary cutter on, but my guess it's all of 16'.
 

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Tacoma rated at 6,400 lbs, you should be fine. My 3/4 ton 4x4 Silverado rated to pull 12k at the hitch, and the ATV trailer loaded comes in around 3k.

Wife's Subaru Outback rated to pull 5k...but the Big Block is a much better choice.


20180426_165927.jpg
 

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So is it safe to say you can haul a 2025R loader mower tractor on a 6x12 utility trailer? Which I have! Everyone has told me that I have to have a dual axle trailer to haul it on. My trailer has a 3500# axle under it.
Basically identical to the atv trailer pictured in previous post.


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So is it safe to say you can haul a 2025R loader mower tractor on a 6x12 utility trailer? Which I have! Everyone has told me that I have to have a dual axle trailer to haul it on. My trailer has a 3500# axle under it.
Basically identical to the atv trailer pictured in previous post.


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With 2025R, MMM and FEL plus the weight of the trailer itself I think you be real close to max if not over.
 

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So is it safe to say you can haul a 2025R loader mower tractor on a 6x12 utility trailer? Which I have! Everyone has told me that I have to have a dual axle trailer to haul it on. My trailer has a 3500# axle under it.
Basically identical to the atv trailer pictured in previous post.


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As Pat said, you are going to be VERY close to the limit on the axle.
You dont HAVE to have a tandem axle trailer, but they distribute loads better, and ride/pull better than single axles.
If you have to have single axle, its best to have a 7k pound axle under it.
As I said above, Ive hauled my 2025 TLB on a 6x12 single axle, but I dont consider it safe to do so. I know, based on what I know about my trailer and tractor, that I was at or just over the axles limit.
I do NOT haul on the highway, or anywhere over 45mph doing this. I also dont travel more than a couple miles this way.

Lots of guys consider "safe" to be a relative term. Ive seen all sorts of nonsense hauled around all over the country that the hauler considered safe, but was anything but.
To me, "safe" means well within the load limits of the tow vehicle and trailer, and properly secured. If your load is all of that, then it should be safe to haul anywhere.
I also prefer to leave myself a bit of a safety margin, where some dont mind riding right on on the edge.
Trailers are rated as they are when new. Age takes a toll, and if you are anywhere where rust takes its toll on automobiles, it does the same to trailers.
 

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As Pat said, you are going to be VERY close to the limit on the axle.
You dont HAVE to have a tandem axle trailer, but they distribute loads better, and ride/pull better than single axles.
If you have to have single axle, its best to have a 7k pound axle under it.
As I said above, Ive hauled my 2025 TLB on a 6x12 single axle, but I dont consider it safe to do so. I know, based on what I know about my trailer and tractor, that I was at or just over the axles limit.
I do NOT haul on the highway, or anywhere over 45mph doing this. I also dont travel more than a couple miles this way.

Lots of guys consider "safe" to be a relative term. Ive seen all sorts of nonsense hauled around all over the country that the hauler considered safe, but was anything but.
To me, "safe" means well within the load limits of the tow vehicle and trailer, and properly secured. If your load is all of that, then it should be safe to haul anywhere.
I also prefer to leave myself a bit of a safety margin, where some dont mind riding right on on the edge.
Trailers are rated as they are when new. Age takes a toll, and if you are anywhere where rust takes its toll on automobiles, it does the same to trailers.
With brakes!
 

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Consider Aluminum??

I used an aluminum trailer when I had a Tacoma.
This kept the weight down to "near" the max towing capacity of 3000lb :)

You can see it here at the beginning of this video. I would not recommend this brand of trailer (Wolverine), but the concept of an aluminum tandem axle 16' is more compelling to me than a single axle trailer that is too short for comfort.


 

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So is it safe to say you can haul a 2025R loader mower tractor on a 6x12 utility trailer? Which I have! Everyone has told me that I have to have a dual axle trailer to haul it on. My trailer has a 3500# axle under it.
Basically identical to the atv trailer pictured in previous post.
A lot of the 6x12 single axle utility trailers that places like Home Depot sell only have a 3,000 lb axle on them. Once to factor in the 1,000 lbs that the trailer itself weighs you are only left with 2,000 cargo capacity.

A Gen-2 2025R weighs (per Deere) 1,793 lbs. And that's stripped - no loader, no bucket, no nothing. Once you mount a loader, bucket, etc on that machine you're well over-weight.

A single axle trailer with a 3,500 lb axle might be enough to add the loader and bucket and scrape by on rated capacity.
 

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I have a 2017 Tacoma and a 2038r with loaded tires. I have borrowed a trailer once and towed it around 20 miles. I had the loader off, but had a ~700 lbs tiller, 500+ lbs set of discs, and a ~100 lbs subsoiler all on the ~18' double axle trailer with brakes. So around 4200 lbs of equipment on a heavy steel trailer, I'm guessing 2,300 lbs based on similar looking ones online. Most of this trip was on highways, and the Tacoma did ok. I definitely feel like doing this weekly would be more then I'd want to do. It just felt that the Tacoma was straining too much to pull that much weight. But for something I'd do a couple times a year it seems fine. I know the 2025 is smaller, but I'm pretty sure I'd stick with a double axle trailer. The Tacoma is quite sensitive to tung weight, and dealing with trying to balance on a single axle trailer can be a issue if you are bringing implements. I'd also stick with a longer trailer closer to an 18', as I feel you want room for the loader + a long implement like a rotary cutter, discs or something. With this much load, I never felt unsafe (can't stop, or hard to control), it really was just pulling power that it lacked. I have the V6, I'm sure you are aware but getting the 4 cylinder Tacoma is not something you should do if you ever plan to tow anything.


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Trailer in my picture is from Lowe's, and is actually owned by my wife's ex-husband. He's super cool and let us borrow it whenever we need to travel. We've taken it from Nebraska to Moab Utah twice now.

Before every long trip, I take the wheels off and repack the bearings, replace bearings as needed. Also installed a set of bearing Buddies, they are great for keeping axles greased. Here are the specs.... ATVs are 730 lb dry, so I figure about 1,500 lb total back there.

If you're not pulling your tractor very far, you should be okay.

With this setup I was driving 16 hours, eight hundred plus miles... Doing about 80 miles an hour the whole way. Did great, remember my truck is rated to pull 12000 pounds, and has an 8.1 liter 496 cubic inch V8 engine. Overkill.


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Couple observatyions:

If you have a FEL and rotary cutter on it, 12' won't even be close - figure 16' minimum, especially considering the landscape style trailers you are looking at have gates for ramps and they can't be down on the road.
Going with a 16 and slide in/out ramps will allow you some hang over at the back
Tandem axles solve many many problems - if you go single axle, you may not be able to put the tractor where you want just due to excessive tongue weight - tandem axles would mitigate that quite a bit, it also gives you 4 brakes instead of 2. It also helps limit weight transfer while loading, unless you put extra jacks in the back landscape trailers nor slide in/out ramps have a mechanism to limit weight transfer while loading
On you Tacoma, check all facets of your towing capacity, including tongue weight, when you need a weight distribution hitch etc
 

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I tow several times a year sometimes 20 miles sometime 800 miles. As long you don't push it you will have no problem the fastest I tow is 60 and the Tacoma handles it well. If I was going to tow it a lot I would look into a Trunda. I have a V6 and 5 speed auto and tow in 4th. The trailer I use is a PJ 16' 83" wide with 2 7K axles. If you go with a single axle get it with a 7K axle because the 2025R with FEL or box blade and trailer will be right at the 3500 axle limit just guessing. Also with the two axles, you can balance the tractor on the trailer. I know some members will get on me but I also installed some Sumo springs because I haul some heave pallets in the box of the truck it rides a little stiffer but the back end is not sagging and it gives the truck a little rake. The nice thing is my Tacoma was prewired for a brake controller.

Doug
 

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Full Disclosure, I owned and operated a trailer sales and hitch sales and service business for several years. So, I have experience in the matter of trailers, hitches, properly securing loads and I have witnessed far too many "cringe worthy" loads and operators. I have been to the scene of accidents where the trailer was over loaded or improperly secured or some other problem. You don't ever want to be responsible for injuring or killing another person because of your negligence in not safely loading or hauling trailers.

Running with the trailer loaded at the weight limits is something I would not recommend. Personally, I would not haul any SCUT or CUT on a single axle trailer as 95% of the single axle trailers have axles load rated to 3,500 lb or less. Some are even as low as 2,000 lbs for the axle limit on low quality trailers sold at Big Box retailers.

I have hauled many trailers many miles and eventually, you are going to have a tire problem (flat tire, cut tire, all sorts of things happen) and with a single axle trailer, you immediately have a serious control problem if you are anywhere near 55MPH or even worse, at highway speeds.

When the tire goes down on the single axle trailer, the trailer will tip heavily to one side. If the tire blows out, or even worse, you have an axle or bearing failure, the trailer lists precipitously to the lost tire side and that is when you had better have the load tied down Very WELL and CORRECTLY or you risk losing the load.

People pull all kinds of loads which they shouldn't. In fact, it's almost like some form of a strange badge of honor to see how extreme one can make their load verses their tow vehicle. Just because you CAN, sure doesn't mean you SHOULD. If Someone gets hurt or killed because of your "creative" trailer load, you can go to prison and at a minimum, you will be held financially responsible.

Trailer Brakes
You need trailer brakes if the loaded trailer is going to approach 40% or more of the tow vehicles actual weight. That means a 2,000 pound tractor on a 1,200 trailer needs brakes unless the tow vehicle weighs 8,000 pounds or more. Many states, including those in which many of those commenting on this thread have listed as their place of domicile, require either ALL TRAILERS to have brakes or those which weigh 3,000 lbs or more.

Sure, you can pull anything without trailer brakes and likely will get away with it. But you need to be able to stop the loaded trailer behind the tow vehicle in an emergency stop from any speed and without having trailer brakes, you are severely stressing the brakes on the tow vehicle and drastically increasing the distance it takes to safely stop your vehicle. .

Please be safe and responsible when towing trailers and loads. Please always keep the following in mind when towing.

1. If you are towing a load over 2,000 pounds on a trailer, please consider a trailer with electric brakes as that means the loaded trailer weighs more than 3,000 lbs with any SCUT on it.

2. Always tie down the load to remain in place in the case of an emergency stopping situation. That means a minimum of 4 tie down straps properly placed and secured.

3. Each tie down strap should be rated for the weight of the entire load. If the tractor weighs 2,000 pounds, EACH strap should be rated for 2,000 pounds of more to properly secure the load.

4. Motorcycle tie down straps and ATV tie down straps are for light loads. A SCUT or CUT is not a light load. Please use quality ratcheting straps each rated to the load and each secured to a designated "D" ring tie down point, also load rated for at least the amount of the load. DO NOT secure loads by attaching to railings, ramp gates and other parts of the trailer not designed as tie down points.

5. NEVER tow any trailer with a ball size that isn't matched to the trailer tongue and coupler. Please make sure the hitch ball is rated for at least the entire loaded trailer weight. Buy a quality hitch ball and ball mount as they bear the load and are critical for safe towing.

6. Always cross your trailer hitch safety chains when attaching them to the tow vehicle. This is done so if the trailer hitch comes off the vehicle ball mount, the safety chains will "cradle" the trailer tongue and prevent it from making contact with the pavement and pile driving into the pavement and causing a terrible crash behind you.

Proper length safety chains should be able to catch the trailer tongue and allow a controlled stop if it comes unhooked. If you don't cross the safety chains, the trailer tongue just falls down to the road between the chains and often results in snapping the safety chains or otherwise separating from the tow vehicle when the trailer tongue strikes a crack, manhole cover, pothole, etc.

7. Make sure your safety chains are properly hooked to the tow vehicle. This means that the hook should be over the top of the attachment point on the vehicle, and not hooked from underneath in a manner which could allow the hooks to fall off the tow vehicle when the chains are fully extended as they would be, if the trailer came unhooked for some fashion.

8. Make sure your trailer has ALL LIGHTS operating whenever it is on the road, even for short trip distances. Drivers are more distracted than ever and they aren't watching the vehicles around them in many instances as they should be. Working Trailer lights are very important.

9. Please secure everything on the trailer, even for short trips.
Just because something doesn't move, doesn't mean it can't move.

10. Always place either a grade 5 or grade 8 bolt secured with at least one nut or a proper spring clip pin to prevent the trailer tongue from being able to come off the ball mount and hitch ball if the spring loaded hitch coupler either opens or breaks. For those unsure of what the hitch coupler is, it is the spring loaded lever on the tongue of the trailer which you push down and lock in place parallel to the trailer tongue. It secures the trailer tongue to the hitch ball on the ball mount in the vehicles hitch. This keeps the trailer from coming off the hitch ball. Put a bolt or pin through the hole in the coupler and it can't open with the bolt or pin in place. I would bet less than 20% of all trailers towed take this super easy and critical safety step.

You are responsible for your vehicle and trailer and it's load. When you are loading a trailer preparing to tow it, ask yourself, would you want your family following directly behind the trailer and load for 1,000 miles? If the answer is no, don't haul it without making the load safe for towing and properly loaded and sized for the tow vehicle and the load being hauled.

Just because it attaches, doesn't mean it's safe or even correct.

Just because the load fits on the trailer, doesn't mean it is a safe and legal load. Please use common sense and be safe when loading and hauling anything........
 

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Full Disclosure, I owned and operated a trailer sales and hitch sales and service business for several years. So, I have experience in the matter of trailers, hitches, properly securing loads and I have witnessed far too many "cringe worthy" loads and operators. I have been to the scene of accidents where the trailer was over loaded or improperly secured or some other problem. You don't ever want to be responsible for injuring or killing another person because of your negligence in not safely loading or hauling trailers.

Running with the trailer loaded at the weight limits is something I would not recommend. Personally, I would not haul any SCUT or CUT on a single axle trailer as 95% of the single axle trailers have axles load rated to 3,500 lb or less. Some are even as low as 2,000 lbs for the axle limit on low quality trailers sold at Big Box retailers.

I have hauled many trailers many miles and eventually, you are going to have a tire problem (flat tire, cut tire, all sorts of things happen) and with a single axle trailer, you immediately have a serious control problem if you are anywhere near 55MPH or even worse, at highway speeds.

When the tire goes down on the single axle trailer, the trailer will tip heavily to one side. If the tire blows out, or even worse, you have an axle or bearing failure, the trailer lists precipitously to the lost tire side and that is when you had better have the load tied down Very WELL and CORRECTLY or you risk losing the load.

People pull all kinds of loads which they shouldn't. In fact, it's almost like some form of a strange badge of honor to see how extreme one can make their load verses their tow vehicle. Just because you CAN, sure doesn't mean you SHOULD. If Someone gets hurt or killed because of your "creative" trailer load, you can go to prison and at a minimum, you will be held financially responsible.

Trailer Brakes
You need trailer brakes if the loaded trailer is going to approach 40% or more of the tow vehicles actual weight. That means a 2,000 pound tractor on a 1,200 trailer needs brakes unless the tow vehicle weighs 8,000 pounds or more. Many states, including those in which many of those commenting on this thread have listed as their place of domicile, require either ALL TRAILERS to have brakes or those which weigh 3,000 lbs or more.

Sure, you can pull anything without trailer brakes and likely will get away with it. But you need to be able to stop the loaded trailer behind the tow vehicle in an emergency stop from any speed and without having trailer brakes, you are severely stressing the brakes on the tow vehicle and drastically increasing the distance it takes to safely stop your vehicle. .

Please be safe and responsible when towing trailers and loads. Please always keep the following in mind when towing.

1. If you are towing a load over 2,000 pounds on a trailer, please consider a trailer with electric brakes as that means the loaded trailer weighs more than 3,000 lbs with any SCUT on it.

2. Always tie down the load to remain in place in the case of an emergency stopping situation. That means a minimum of 4 tie down straps properly placed and secured.

3. Each tie down strap should be rated for the weight of the entire load. If the tractor weighs 2,000 pounds, EACH strap should be rated for 2,000 pounds of more to properly secure the load.

4. Motorcycle tie down straps and ATV tie down straps are for light loads. A SCUT or CUT is not a light load. Please use quality ratcheting straps each rated to the load and each secured to a designated "D" ring tie down point, also load rated for at least the amount of the load. DO NOT secure loads by attaching to railings, ramp gates and other parts of the trailer not designed as tie down points.

5. NEVER tow any trailer with a ball size that isn't matched to the trailer tongue and coupler. Please make sure the hitch ball is rated for at least the entire loaded trailer weight. Buy a quality hitch ball and ball mount as they bear the load and are critical for safe towing.

6. Always cross your trailer hitch safety chains when attaching them to the tow vehicle. This is done so if the trailer hitch comes off the vehicle ball mount, the safety chains will "cradle" the trailer tongue and prevent it from making contact with the pavement and pile driving into the pavement and causing a terrible crash behind you.

Proper length safety chains should be able to catch the trailer tongue and allow a controlled stop if it comes unhooked. If you don't cross the safety chains, the trailer tongue just falls down to the road between the chains and often results in snapping the safety chains or otherwise separating from the tow vehicle when the trailer tongue strikes a crack, manhole cover, pothole, etc.

7. Make sure your safety chains are properly hooked to the tow vehicle. This means that the hook should be over the top of the attachment point on the vehicle, and not hooked from underneath in a manner which could allow the hooks to fall off the tow vehicle when the chains are fully extended as they would be, if the trailer came unhooked for some fashion.

8. Make sure your trailer has ALL LIGHTS operating whenever it is on the road, even for short trip distances. Drivers are more distracted than ever and they aren't watching the vehicles around them in many instances as they should be. Working Trailer lights are very important.

9. Please secure everything on the trailer, even for short trips.
Just because something doesn't move, doesn't mean it can't move.

10. Always place either a grade 5 or grade 8 bolt secured with at least one nut or a proper spring clip pin to prevent the trailer tongue from being able to come off the ball mount and hitch ball if the spring loaded hitch coupler either opens or breaks. For those unsure of what the hitch coupler is, it is the spring loaded lever on the tongue of the trailer which you push down and lock in place parallel to the trailer tongue. It secures the trailer tongue to the hitch ball on the ball mount in the vehicles hitch. This keeps the trailer from coming off the hitch ball. Put a bolt or pin through the hole in the coupler and it can't open with the bolt or pin in place. I would bet less than 20% of all trailers towed take this super easy and critical safety step.

You are responsible for your vehicle and trailer and it's load. When you are loading a trailer preparing to tow it, ask yourself, would you want your family following directly behind the trailer and load for 1,000 miles? If the answer is no, don't haul it without making the load safe for towing and properly loaded and sized for the tow vehicle and the load being hauled.

Just because it attaches, doesn't mean it's safe or even correct.

Just because the load fits on the trailer, doesn't mean it is a safe and legal load. Please use common sense and be safe when loading and hauling anything........
X2!! on your ten commandments

Doug
 

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I’d also like to add on trailer length to go around 18’ or greater. This is helpful as most lumber is under 16’ and you can keep materials confined on trailer flat if needed.

The tundra is a great truck but I would recommend looking at other trucks besides the Tacoma. My brother in law sold his Silverado 1500 and bought a new Tacoma, had the truck for 3 months or so when a drunk driver went into his lane and hit head on. Everyone is fine.

He ended up getting another Sierra a few things he didn’t like about the Tacoma were: fuel was worse, poor ride quality, cost of the Tacoma limited was more than the Sierra elevation, struggled towing vs the full size and interior ended up being to small
 
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