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Newbue here! I will be purchasing a 1025r with FEL and MMM for our new home. They will be delivering the tractor, but in the future, I may need to tow it. I have a 2011 4runner that supposedly can handle a 550# tongue weight and tow 5000 lbs. Will I be okay for short towing trips? By my math, the tractor with implements and trailer will be roughly 4000 lbs. Thanks!

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Don't know why not.
 

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Weight

Unless you have several implements, that weight sounds a bit high. If it's correct, that leaves you with 1000 lbs for the trailer weight and still stay within towing capacity. Depending on the length of the trailer, you may be pushing it.

I think you are ok but would want to check the total weight of the tractor, FEL and implements you will want to carry and then shop for a trailer that works. Particularly if you get a backhoe, it's going to be tight to get a trailer long enough and light enough to be under that 5,000. You definitely need brakes on the trailer and a brake controller in the truck.

If you were towing long distance, I'd say get a bigger truck. Short distances should be manageable as long as you do your homework up front. It will help if you can find a set of scales and use that to check the actual tongue weight with the tractor on the trailer. If possible, you want a trailer long enough so you can shift the tractor forward or backward to get the tongue weight right.

Treefarmer
 

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I've towed mine behind a Honda Odyssey it's rated at 3500 towing never had a problem, good for it enjoy . As usual with any tow use common sense when stopping .
 

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Like mentioned above, tow with common sense. I think you will be fine, when we are at the lake I see a lot of 4-runners pulling boats and campers that are right at the towing capcity and most likely several are towing more so. Not saying that makes it ok and you or anyone else should do the same, but for your weight estimate you have figured all will be fine.
 

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You should be fine. Just be sure and secure the load. :good2:
 

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The 1025R with loader is what, 2300#? Mower another #400? So you're under 3000 with the equipment. Then you have to factor in the trailer. First, is the trailer rated to carry 3000# (not 3000# axle which also has to carry the trailer's own weight). If your trailer can take 3000# then that part is good. Now add the trailer's own weight to the tractor's and see where it falls in relation to your tow vehicle's capacity. As a general rule of thumb, for short trips in good conditions you can go up to the towing capacity of your vehicle. But if you want to tow long distances (across the country), through mountains, in wet or snowy conditions, or on a regular basis you really should not be that close to actual capacity.

Finally - and you probably are already well aware of this but just in case - proper loading of the trailer is vital. You could be well within trailer/tow vehicle specs but load it wrong and create a disaster for yourself. You need to load it with proper tongue weight (weight distribution front-to-back on the trailer) and securely fastening things down. There is a TON of info out on the web about trailer loading so I'm not going to try to summarize it here. Just don't neglect it.

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks to all for the advice. I might rent a trailer and tow the tractor home (15 miles), and if it is unruly, not buy the trailer and let the dealer move it during repair or maintenance.

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I pull a 16' enclosed 2 axle trailer every day for work and I also haul my 1025r with loader and backhoe in it occasionally. Make sure when you tie the tractor down to do it from both axles and block the tires. Also keep the loader bucket flat with the floor. And I always try to center the weight over the 2 axles. That way the trailer is carrying the weight.
 

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I pull a 16' enclosed 2 axle trailer every day for work and I also haul my 1025r with loader and backhoe in it occasionally. Make sure when you tie the tractor down to do it from both axles and block the tires. Also keep the loader bucket flat with the floor. And I always try to center the weight over the 2 axles. That way the trailer is carrying the weight.

*SLIGHTLY* forward of centered on the axles. You do not want a light tongue on your tow vehicle. You will only do that once in your life. If you survive the first time you will sacrifice a little rear tire wear on the tow vehicle for avoiding a light trailer tongue ever again.

 

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*SLIGHTLY* forward of centered on the axles. You do not want a light tongue on your tow vehicle. You will only do that once in your life. If you survive the first time you will sacrifice a little rear tire wear on the tow vehicle for avoiding a light trailer tongue ever again.

I guess I've been doing it wrong for the last 20 years, 4 different trailers and 4 different trucks and right at 600,000 miles pulling a trailer without one accident. Lucky I guess. (Knock on wood)
 

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I guess I've been doing it wrong for the last 20 years, 4 different trailers and 4 different trucks and right at 600,000 miles pulling a trailer without one accident. Lucky I guess. (Knock on wood)
I'm right there with you, (from the farming that once was and my business now) the farm trucks and my personal trucks have spent the majority of their miles with the rear tires shoved up into the wheel wells. I never have said it was the right way, heck that's evident from the gouges all over Kentucky roads that I may or may not be responsible for by those pesky trailer jacks getting in the way of heavy loads, but many years and many miles have gone by with only a few accidents that was by fault of others (knocking on wood as well)
 

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Trailer Control and Weight Distribution

When I bought my trailer, I added a sway bar system, figure if its good enough for my camper trailer, it would be good for my equipment trailer. The good thing is it puts the weight back on the trailer axles, not on the tongue/ball and gives a lot better control when turning. Now I do have a dual axle trailer with electric brakes as well. Maybe overkill, but I don't want anything to happen to my green baby when hauling it up to camp an hour away. For under $500.00 its good insurance.
 

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I'm right there with you, (from the farming that once was and my business now) the farm trucks and my personal trucks have spent the majority of their miles with the rear tires shoved up into the wheel wells. I never have said it was the right way, heck that's evident from the gouges all over Kentucky roads that I may or may not be responsible for by those pesky trailer jacks getting in the way of heavy loads, but many years and many miles have gone by with only a few accidents that was by fault of others (knocking on wood as well)
Thanks ky_shawn, I thought it was just me!
 

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personally i wouldnt haul that load with anything less then a class 8 road tractor:kidw_truck_smiley:
but thats just me:greentractorride:
 

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10 % for me

I've always heard you want 10%-20% of the trailer load on the tongue not to exceed the towing vehicle rating. If I have an implement on the back of my 790, it's well over the 10% on the tongue because it's only a 16' trailer and I don't have a lot of wiggle room.

I agree with the video. Once and only once have I loaded a trailer too heavy on the back. Before I even got it off the farm, I realized it was a problem and moved stuff around to get the tongue weight right. Now I've painted "spotting marks" on the trailer floor. One set is on the back of the trailer to mark where the loading ramps should be and the other set is for the front wheels so I get the fore-aft placement right. It saves time and getting off and on the tractor to check that I'm in the right spot.

Treefarmer
 

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You have to consider the trailer design as well. Some trailers have the axles centered on the bed while some manufacturers move the back behind center. When you load to the center of the axles on those trailers the bias is already some percentage forward on the tongue.

Every trailer is different and it makes a huge difference as to how the weight is distributed and applied to the tongue. I've been in some little wiggles and had a load of drywall that almost drove me down into median or over the guide-rail into the a lake because I couldn't get enough of it loaded onto the tongue. (took me to just of 90mph to get it under control too)

Not saying loading it directly over the axles is a bad thing, but if there is insufficient weight on the tongue it will not be a pleasant ride. It can go from smooth to on your roof the blink of an eye. Sometimes there isn't anything you can do to stop it. Any non-fifthwheel trailer is susceptible to pendulum wrecking from poor loading.

 

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This is another one of the things I get obsessive about - having my trailer loaded properly.

When I loaded my tractor on my then 16' tandem axle 10k# trailer to my F-150 with max tow package - as I pull up on the trailer I watch the rear bumper of my truck. My goal is to get the rear bumper to drop 2". And yes, I have measured it at different times. Since I have no way to scale my hitch weight each time I load something, this little rule of thumb has worked out well for me to have my hitch weight properly balanced.
 

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You have to consider the trailer design as well. Some trailers have the axles centered on the bed while some manufacturers move the back behind center. When you load to the center of the axles on those trailers the bias is already some percentage forward on the tongue.

Every trailer is different and it makes a huge difference as to how the weight is distributed and applied to the tongue.
Exactly. Which is why you need to pay attention to the "10% rule" more so than about where the load is in relation to the axles. No matter what the trailer config you need it biased somewhat to the front, but not overboard. The 10% thing helps judge that. Now I know that it isn't feasible to actually weigh it and know what 10% is, but that's where coaltrain's "does the bumper of the tow vehicle drop a bit" eyeballing comes in. If you know you have weight on the trailer biased to the front and it is enough to drop the bumper somewhat without slamming it to the ground then you're probably in the ballpark. At least close enough to not experience the death wobble. When the tail wags the dog nothing fun happens.

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This is another one of the things I get obsessive about - having my trailer loaded properly.

When I loaded my tractor on my then 16' tandem axle 10k# trailer to my F-150 with max tow package - as I pull up on the trailer I watch the rear bumper of my truck. My goal is to get the rear bumper to drop 2". And yes, I have measured it at different times. Since I have no way to scale my hitch weight each time I load something, this little rule of thumb has worked out well for me to have my hitch weight properly balanced.
Sure you do: http://a.co/iSc4wjB
 
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