Green Tractor Talk banner

What do you use to tie down your tractor

  • Chain and binders

    Votes: 16 55.2%
  • Ratchet straps

    Votes: 12 41.4%
  • Other

    Votes: 1 3.4%
  • Duct tape....could not resist

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    29
  • Poll closed .
1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,148 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So a thread brought up an interesting question, for towing a scut...chains or straps...and by straps I mean 3333 lbs or higher.
What do you use....winner is the wayI will go.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,272 Posts
I voted chains/binders because that is what I have now, but I used straps before I got them and never had any issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
I voted chains because I've never seen chains break when used appropriately. Straps can get nicked and cut. Then again, I'm a worry wart.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,148 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Should have added this, but please include what size....thx
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,110 Posts
To begin with (16 yrs ago)used baby straps like 300# breaking ,2nd trip to dealer with a JD425 on trailer , strap breaks loosens the other front strap. All but lost the mower .
Then I bought better and finally ended up with 1500#. This summer I got 2 binders ,always had the chains.
Tractor or SXS doesn't move now.

So chain and binder ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,580 Posts
I use ratchet straps because that is what the dealers have used when they delivered my tractors.

I use 10,000 lb straps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Use chains and binders because that's what the dealer advised me to use and sold me when I bought my 770 and trailer from him 20+ years ago.
Still have the trailer, chains, and binders, traded in the 770 for the 1025R TLB.
 

·
Bonehead Club Lackey
Joined
·
10,200 Posts
I didn't vote. Thought about voting "other" but didn't think that was right either. I use chains, binders, straps, just what ever I feel like using at the time just as long as I think it will hold. I know, I know, heavy chains don't break. I'm not worried about what I use to hold the tractor down with because I haven't seen a trailer yet that will withstand an accident and the tractor is on it. It's the trailer that will give first. Chains will rip whatever it's attached to right off the trailer. So for me it's whatever I know will hold the tractor in place going down the road and hope and pray I don't get into an accident. If the trailer is made to withstand an accident then it would cost half what I paid for the tractor...or more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,389 Posts
Chains and binders, because that's what we always used to tie down farm tractors and equipment. That was a long time before ratchet straps. I will check on the size. Can't remember.

I would be interested to hear from anyone who has used duct tape. Hopefully, with pictures.:laugh:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,468 Posts
Same as DRobinson I use chains most of the time. Partially out of habit and partially because I have a ton of chains and binders in the barn.

When I had my mowing business I used ratchet straps for my zero turn because they were faster and the 757 a lot lighter than my tractor.

You have to keep constant attention to straps - they degrade quickly when exposed to sunlight and can get knicked and cut easily. Not that you can just ignore chains however - they get a good inspection before use.

Not sure of the size chain without looking but it is all transport chain like found on tractor trailer flatbeds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,965 Posts
Hiya,

I voted chains and binders, that's what my brother has in the box on his trailer..... when I "borrow" it :good2:

Tom
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,057 Posts
For a SCUT, either chains or straps would be appropriate. For chain I would probably go 5/16" G70, and straps should be at least 3,333 lbs working load and 10k breaking loads. If you go with chains, consider using ratchet binders instead of the lever type. Much easier to work with.

I personally use 3/8" chain with binders for my tractor, but it's a little heavier than a 1 series. :laugh:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
Hi All
I transport my 1025R reasonably often. I have been using 2.8 ton load straps but I would feel safer using chains. So to that end I bought a pair of load binders (see below) the top picture is as purchased the bottom is after modification. I replaced the 1 meter grade 70 chain with 2 meters of grade 70 chain and replaced the 5/16" shortening hooks with 5/16" load hooks. The load binders are rated at 3.8 ton. My trailer has rated load rings front and back, at the back I will use chain with shortening hooks and the load binders at the front, I hook the load binders to the FEL frame via round slings.
Regards John:bigthumb:
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,757 Posts
I use my straps that i bought back when i had leased on with my own truck and trailer. they are way over kill for my 2520, but at least they don't move once u set them the 2nd time. they have a chain at each end. i have no idea what size they are??:dunno:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,965 Posts
Both

My 790 is a bit heavier than a SCUT but I use 5/16 or 3/8 Grade 70 chains on the rear of the tractor and 10,000 straps on the front. My basic thought is that I want any two of the four attachments to be able to hold the tractor to the trailer. If the two were only on one side, that isn't gonna work so well but realistically if the trailer comes loose both are going to be toast anyway.

Why use both? I can use short chains at the rear but the front requires a longer strap or chain plus I usually have the FEL on the front and am dragging the strap over that. I also have connections for the grapple that are somewhat in the way. I'm happier with a strap over paint than the chains. I also tighten the chains first and then the straps because the straps have a finer adjustment, at least until I start using ratchet load binders.

Lots of perfectly workable solutions out there. This just happens to be what I've settled on given what I already had and the considerations above.

Treefarmer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
Something to consider when loading a trailer is more than just the weight of the vehicle. The DOT has a formula they use to calculate the use of traps and chains in setting standards for securing a load. You can read about it here: https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations/cargo-securement/cargo-securement-rules under the performance criteria.

For those that don't want to read all the legalese I can boil it down to a simple math problem. The DOT recommends that when you secure a load you consider 3 forces: Acceleration, Deceleration and Lateral acceleration. In simple terms pulling away from a stop/accelerating, braking/stopping and side-loads from turning.

For acceleration and side loading they use a 0.5 g figure and for deceleration they use a 0.8 g figure to determine securing a load. Personally I only really get concerned about two of these figures: Deceleration and Side loading. The reason I usually don't go nuts over the acceleration figure is that other than from a stop, anything I tow with isn't going to be accelerating that fast. Side loading is the next in the list of concerns for me as I will turn to get where I need to go. The risk here is a sudden lane change by someone not paying attention and a reaction by the driver putting a larger than desired side load on.

The big issue I worry about is the deceleration load. I've been around transportation for a long time and seen many a deceleration problem occur. It usually doesn't happen from simple braking, it happens when there is an impact that that you see really high deceleration numbers. The DOT uses a 0.8 g as a guideline for deceleration to calculate normal load. That means a tractor weight 1700# decelerating at 0.8g is exerting 3,060 pounds against the rear straps (not taking into account brakes being applied).

Now look at a small fender bender at 30mph will yield you a 20G loading! That same 1,700# becomes 35,700# of force on the rear straps. It is amazing and quite frankly scary when you do the simple math on these numbers.

My take, for side and front load securing follow the guidelines and make sure if you exceed the recommended breaking yield of your choice of restraints. For the rear restraints there is no room for just enough. Chains, straps, duct-tape....use it all because when you have that simple little 30mph fender bender it will really be unpleasant to have you SCUT sitting in the drivers seat with you.

FWIW I use 20k# straps on front and rear when towing - I use 5 of them. One over each side of the front axle pulling straight to the front of the trailler's D-Rings and two that cross over the rear of the tractor in front of the BH mount and one over the curled bucket on an extended boom. All anchor points are single use per strap in case one of them fails you don't have 2 or more straps loosing an anchor point.

BTW, Don't be this guy...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,468 Posts
Good info BBarn.

Without getting into the specifics like that, what I do when tying down is picture getting into an accident and the trailer over turning. I tie down the equipment so that it will stay with the trailer no matter what happens. Unscientific I know - just the way I look at it.
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top