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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a 2002 F150 XL with the 4.2L V6.





The have the 3.55 axle which says I can tow 5700 pounds.

Here’s the situation.

My son wants to take his cub and his wagon to a tractor show in October. I would like to make it in one trip. The cub weights about 1600 pounds and the wagon weights 990.

Trailer is a single axle with a 3000 pound weight rating. It’s weighs 1000 pounds.

I’d like to put the wagon on the truck bed and then his cub on my trailer.

What are all your guys thoughts. Ideally I’d just get a longer trailer but right now it just ain’t going to happen.

Thanks.





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Your truck is 2 wheel drive?

Is there another label in the door jamb that shows actual cargo weight?

Here is a more comprehensive publication with charts for reference -

https://www.fleet.ford.com/truckbbas/non-html/2001/campercd.pdf

What I see there agrees with your manual. I am surprised by this......

Because of this stuff I weighed my truck a couple years ago - with a full tank of fuel and both of us sitting in it I have a payload capacity of only 790#.
 

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Looking at the picture of your truck with the trailer and tractor loaded, I'd do it. Take it easy, give lots of room and be prepared on braking. My 2320 was delivered on a single axle trailer, like yours pulled by a GMC Yukon. I have a trailer like yours and the one that delivered my tractor, and I would haul my 2320 on it, if I needed to. DOT isn't going to bother you.

Make sure your tires are good and properly inflated.
 

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Well the trailer weighs 1000 and the cub weighs 1600 to equal 2600. While that is over the reccomended weight for a trailer I wouldn't worry about it.

Now the other thing is cargo capacity. Using 15% tongue weight of the trailer is 390. Add to that the wagon and you have 1380. I think that is more of an issue than the trailer weight.

Legal? I doubt very much you would have a problem with an law enforcement. But....what happens if you are in an accident - even if it isn't your fault?

Your truck has a GVWR of 6050 lbs. Without knowing what your truck actually weighs makes it tough to figure out your available payload. The payload is what is available for cargo and trailer tongue weight.

If you do find another label it should have your GCVWR with is combination weight rating and might also have the cargo weight rating. With those numbers you will be able to tell exactly where you would be at.
 

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Looking at the picture of your truck with the trailer and tractor loaded, I'd do it. Take it easy, give lots of room and be prepared on braking. My 2320 was delivered on a single axle trailer, like yours pulled by a GMC Yukon. I have a trailer like yours and the one that delivered my tractor, and I would haul my 2320 on it, if I needed to. DOT isn't going to bother you.

Make sure your tires are good and properly inflated.
You're probably right. My experience gets me too wound up about weights and legalities.
 

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Well the trailer weighs 1000 and the cub weighs 1600 to equal 2600. While that is over the reccomended weight for a trailer I wouldn't worry about it.

Now the other thing is cargo capacity. Using 15% tongue weight of the trailer is 390. Add to that the wagon and you have 1380. I think that is more of an issue than the trailer weight.

Legal? I doubt very much you would have a problem with an law enforcement. But....what happens if you are in an accident - even if it isn't your fault?

Your truck has a GVWR of 6050 lbs. Without knowing what your truck actually weighs makes it tough to figure out your available payload. The payload is what is available for cargo and trailer tongue weight.

If you do find another label it should have your GCVWR with is combination weight rating and might also have the cargo weight rating. With those numbers you will be able to tell exactly where you would be at.
Operator's manual shows 10000 pounds, Stan.

Manual also show max trailer weight at 2000 pounds.

So, my official answer is I don't know.

Unofficial answer is, I'd do it.
 

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I have a 2002 F150 XL with the 4.2L V6.





The have the 3.55 axle which says I can tow 5700 pounds.

Here’s the situation.

My son wants to take his cub and his wagon to a tractor show in October. I would like to make it in one trip. The cub weights about 1600 pounds and the wagon weights 990.

Trailer is a single axle with a 3000 pound weight rating. It’s weighs 1000 pounds.

I’d like to put the wagon on the truck bed and then his cub on my trailer.

What are all your guys thoughts. Ideally I’d just get a longer trailer but right now it just ain’t going to happen.

Thanks.





Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
A friend of mine had the exact same truck but a different color. I helped him pick it out when it was brand new. He also had a 24' enclosed car trailer. Usually I towed it with my 95 F350 dually. He sold his 71 340 Cuda to a guy from Maryland. Said he didn't want to bother me so he used the F150 to deliver it. Said it handled the trailer okay. However nothing was in the trucks bed but the trailers spare tire.

I'd load it and see how she sits. If it looks okay take it for a local test drive. Then decide. You don't want to wreck anything.
 

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Looking at the picture of your truck with the trailer and tractor loaded, I'd do it. Take it easy, give lots of room and be prepared on braking. My 2320 was delivered on a single axle trailer, like yours pulled by a GMC Yukon. I have a trailer like yours and the one that delivered my tractor, and I would haul my 2320 on it, if I needed to. DOT isn't going to bother you.

Make sure your tires are good and properly inflated.
Good time to grease the bearings also.
I'm with Don, drive smart, test it out a bit and you'll be fine.
 

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I calculate the tongue weight at 260 which is just within that trucks ability. My only 2 concerns with doing what you are attempting is hwy speeds and stopping. My dad and I used to haul wood on exact copy trailers and I had a 3/4 ton Ford diesel and he had a 1/2 ton Ford long box 4x4 regular cab older than yours. I drove normal speeds not even thinking he was overweight. I looked in the mirror in time to see his trailer make a swing to the left and right nearly catastrophic. He got it shut down and chased a turd from his shorts but it scared the living sh!t out of both of us. Cheap lesson. I've never owned a 1/2 ton truck and never will for that reason. My dad now has a 2014 F150 and he pulls my boat occasionally which is heavier but the boat trailer has surge brakes and his current truck has a higher tow rating. If you decide to do this, just be aware it's pushing the safety margin and like others said, drive smart.
 

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If there's a truck scale close by load everything up and take it over and weigh it. Maybe even a dump scale will work. That might ease your mind and tell you if you are within your weight limits. If you're even close make sure you have good brakes.
 

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Hiya,

I would do it any day maybe twice on a Sunday.

I'll say you'll be fine, however, if anything is going to "get you" it's the tongue weight with a single axle trailer.

On most single axle setups, the axle is biased to the rear, thereby making load placement a bit more important than on a dual axle setup as moving the load center a foot or so either way can either make the tongue too heavy, or not heavy enough. Remember tongue weight is part of the weight carried by the truck.

Here is a simple way to get a fairly close weight figure:
bathroom scale.JPG
 

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Howdy J 3 Driver,

What you are doing is fine. The weight of the wagon, the tractor and the trailer add up for simple math to 3600lbs. According to your manual you can tow up to 5700lbs. You could technically add another 1400lbs to your trailer and still be under what the truck can tow. You said your trailer can hold 3000 lbs. With the wagon in the back of truck that will equal out the weight ratio and keep everything level and make for easier towing...

Just give yourself some breaking distance because the truck is doing all the breaking unless your trailer has electric breaks?

I would load it just like you are and give her hell! I live in PA and you are well within what the truck can do.

Good luck
 

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Did I miss the brakes discussion?/ :dunno:

The MAX weight you can tow without brakes is pretty low,, like,,, 2,000 or 2,500 pounds.

If you have no brakes,, that trumps truck rating. :flag_of_truce:
 

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I calculate the tongue weight at 260 which is just within that trucks ability. My only 2 concerns with doing what you are attempting is hwy speeds and stopping. My dad and I used to haul wood on exact copy trailers and I had a 3/4 ton Ford diesel and he had a 1/2 ton Ford long box 4x4 regular cab older than yours. I drove normal speeds not even thinking he was overweight. I looked in the mirror in time to see his trailer make a swing to the left and right nearly catastrophic. He got it shut down and chased a turd from his shorts but it scared the living sh!t out of both of us. Cheap lesson. I've never owned a 1/2 ton truck and never will for that reason. My dad now has a 2014 F150 and he pulls my boat occasionally which is heavier but the boat trailer has surge brakes and his current truck has a higher tow rating. If you decide to do this, just be aware it's pushing the safety margin and like others said, drive smart.
This is what I loved about that Crew Cab. I never had to worry about not having enough truck.
 

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How far away from home is the tractor show? How much longer would it take to make two trips?

Assuming you're within the correct tongue weight, my only concern would be making an emergency stop or a rapid maneuver to avoid something. The chances are you'd be perfectly fine but I'd be exceptionally aware of traffic conditions ahead and surrounding you.

I probably upset a lot of drivers but I always stay under the posted speed limit when pulling a loaded trailer.
 

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How far away from home is the tractor show? How much longer would it take to make two trips?

Assuming you're within the correct tongue weight, my only concern would be making an emergency stop or a rapid maneuver to avoid something. The chances are you'd be perfectly fine but I'd be exceptionally aware of traffic conditions ahead and surrounding you.

I probably upset a lot of drivers but I always stay under the posted speed limit when pulling a loaded trailer.
Me too!

Doug
 

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I must be missing something here. Perhaps it is too early on a Sunday morning for my reading comprehension. But from what I see, there is no issue with the weight. I see 5700# trailer capacity in the manual. Adding your numbers comes out to 2600# for the trailer and 990# in the bed. 2600# is well below 5700 and even adding the tongue weight of roughly 260-390# (10-15% trailer weight) that seems like it is not too much for the truck. You're under the 3000# weight rating of the trailer too. Everything is within specs, by quite a bit. What was the cause for concern??

As for brakes, here in MN trailers with gross weight over 3000# require brakes. Your local laws may be different, so if you want to fully comply you may need to address that. But based on the 3000# cutoff here I'd have to say your load would be just fine without trailer brakes, should you choose to pull that way. At least MN DOT and lawmakers feel that way. Tie things down well, check your tire pressures, and have a smooth trip.

Maybe someone will point out what I missed that everyone is concerned about. Maybe I'll be more awake later...

Rob
 

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As for brakes, here in MN trailers with gross weight over 3000# require brakes. Your local laws may be different, so if you want to fully comply you may need to address that.
Maryland is 3000lbs also, as are most states I thought. This is why "most" single axle trailers are registered as 2990lb max even though they have 3500lb axles.

I agree with you Rob, I don't see the issue either, trailer on J3 :greentractorride::pickup:
 
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