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Corndog Hater
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Many of you don't know, but we bought a new travel trailer this past spring. My kids had outgrown the bunks in our old trailer, and we camp every chance we get in the summer, so I was hearing a lot of complaining. We bought a bunk house model which is longer and heavier than our old trailer. I towed it without incident all summer long. I am now seeking some advice.


My current truck is a lease and the lease is coming due in the next 6 months. I love this 2016 Silverado Double Cab 1500, 5.3L with 3.42 rear and integrated trailer brake controller. Our initial thought was to go to a 3/4 ton, because we "should". However, neither my wife or I, really want a 3/4 ton as a daily driver primarily due to gas mileage, size, and ride comfort. My truck sees no more than 10,000 miles per year. This past camping season, I towed our trailer no more than 1,700 miles.


My thought is to buy a Silverado 1500 Max Tow or GMC Sierra 1500 Max Tow. I would be looking for a crew cab, and the longer (6.5') bed to increase wheelbase as much as possible. The max tow package gives you:


- Increased towing and GCWR
- Automatic Locking Rear Diff
- Handling/Trailering Suspension Package
- Enhanced Cooling Radiator
- Revised Shock Tuning
- Heavier Duty Rear Springs and Increased RGAWR
- 9.76" Rear Axle
- Integrated Trailer Brake Controller
- Trailering Mirrors
- 3.73 Rear (with 5.3 V8) or 3.42 Rear (with 6.2 V8)


As our kids get older, I see us still camping a lot, but closer to home, so I would be towing even less miles. We may throw in a longer trip each summer. But right now, our trips are within a 3 hour radius from home. My experience this summer was that this trailer tows better than our old one. We had a lot of tugging with that one. This one tows great down the road. Of course my biggest issues are wind and big trucks on the interstate. I never had any white knuckle moments this summer, just times where I could tell the trailer was back there, more than other times. I usually adjusted my speed as needed. A couple times on the interstate, I slowed to 55mph from my normal 62mph towing speed (my trailer tires are rated for 75pmh BTW) because that was what felt comfortable. Mrs. CP and I said if we felt too uncomfortable, we would exit the interstate and take a two lane state road, but we never had to.


I tow with an Equalizer 4-Way Sway Control WDH. It is dialed in good and I have very little to no sway. I keep a close eye on tire pressure and run with the trailer tires inflated to near max. I'm seeking advice on what I could do to make my trailer and a 1500 Max Tow, tow the best possible. I am wondering just how much is changing the tires out on the truck to E load LT tires going to change my towing experience? If I added air bags or a helper spring (although the max tow already has an extra leaf spring), will that change my towing experience? If I change out the tires on my trailer to something better than the stock Castle Rocks, how much will that change my towing experience? Safety is my utmost concern, not just for my family, but all the other motorists we encounter. I know my numbers and have researched, and researched some more. Perhaps in the end, I will find that I simply need more truck "mass", and a 3/4 ton will sit in my garage, but for now, I don't want to leave any rock unturned.


I am mainly looking for responses to my above questions. I know towing is a touchy subject, and I'm not looking to go "there". I have been to the scales and as I sit with my current truck and trailer, I am right at my max. However, I felt some real world experience from some folks I trust, would be the most beneficial. As always, thanks!
 

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Sounds like to me you have the best set up for your truck now. I have never towed with a equalizer hitch but it would be nice to have better control swerving around a object on the road and still have it correct right! I see trailers behind trucks that look like Greyhound Buses! To me that is not camping and seems would take most the fun out of driving to your spot to set it up!
 

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My wife was used to the ride of a late 1990's Honda Accord,,
the Honda cornered more like a sports car than a sedan,,

In 1999, we went to look at a truck for her, the salesman put her in a 1500 Silverado,,
She drove off the lot, then turned back on to the lot at the next entrance,, she hated the ride,,,

I told the salesman to bring a 2500 for her to try,,
she got into it, and fell in love,, it rode JUST like the Honda,, no body roll in turns,,

We enjoyed that truck for almost 20 years, and added a new one this year,,

We both LOVE the ride of a 3/4 ton,, the sway bars are so superior,,,

Now, I got to say, my wife will not go on a cruise, as she is so sensitive to motion,,
so, the 3/4 ton is perfect for her,,

This year, the 2018 2500 Silverado got ALL of our travel miles,,
the 2016 Honda sits at home, and is only used as a grocery getter,,,:flag_of_truce:

Give a 3/4 ton a try, if you have not, and honestly evaluate it.

(Both of our 2500's have been snow plow specials, which, I have been told has even stiffer springs than the standard 2500,,,:dunno:)
 

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Towing at max capacity always concerns me when I do it. I have noticed that pulling my 20 ft, 10K car trailer compared to my buddy's dump trailer rated for the same weight, his brakes are way better than mine. I haven't tried a whole lot of things to improve towing. The best I've found is slowing down.

I'm guessing you compared what you have and how it works for you compared to what you are looking at getting. How much more capacity does the new truck have over the old one? Does it move you at least 1K up?
 

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Sounds like you have everything dialed in and working great. I see no reason whatsoever not to go with the max tow truck you are talking about.

To answer one of your questions - E rated tires will make a world of difference. You said you feel very comfortable now on the highway - E rated tires will make enough of a difference to make you very comfortable even with the wind.

The only drawback will be a slightly rougher ride when not towing. A cure for that - if you have the initative - is to run a higher tire pressure when towing than not - say 50# towing and 40# for daily driving. But once you get used to running the tires at any pressure you will soon forget all about it - unless you are on rt 219 down by the PA border.......(like I87 used to be).

Get the 1/2 ton max tow and have them outfit it with E rated tires and trailer on.
 

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I put Load Range E tires on my Tundra for towing my camper and it made no noticeable difference. Check your weights and see what you have. If you need them, you need them. But if you don't absolutely need them, I wouldn't bother.

I'm not a fan of airbags or booster springs. I installed Timbren SES Rear Suspension Boosters. They have no effect on the truck when the bed/hitch are unloaded but act as bump stops once the frame drops down under load and prevents your back end from sagging.
 

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...I would be looking for a crew cab, and the longer (6.5') bed to increase wheelbase as much as possible...
I'm not completely up on the 1500's, but I didn't think that configuration was available? I though with the 6.5' bed you could only get the double cab?
 

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I read all about the tow vehicle, but I could find no mention of the trailer size, weight, etc? The trailer will mostly determine what you need for a tow vehicle. A thought for you.... If you have concerns about a 1/2 ton doing the job, then you already know that you need a 3/4 ton. A 1/2 ton is really just a "play" truck. If you really want some "work" done, you need a 3/4 ton or bigger. My 3/4 ton came with E rated tires which have a max pressure of 80# and with the TPMS, you cannot reduce the pressure very much before the low pressure warning light comes on. The door sticker specifies 80# rear and 65# front and that is what I set them at. No doubt the E tires will handle better, but will not provide what you need, which a 3/4 ton or bigger will.

I have towed with a 1/2 ton and a 3/4 ton, and there is no comparison. The 3/4 ton wins, hands down. Yes, there is a little rougher ride, but you get used to it quickly. Gas mileage on a 1/2 ton equipped for max tow, will not be any better than a standard 3/4 ton, and the 3/4 ton will tow it easier. My 3/4 ton has the 6.2L gas engine with the standard 3.73 axle and, when not towing, it gets 17-18 MPG using non-ethanol gas, but drops to 15 MPG using ethanol gas. If I can get the ethanol gas enough cheaper, then I use it, otherwise I use the non-ethanol gas. 5th and 6th gears are overdrive, which makes a big difference as it only turns 1800 RPM at 70 MPH. And I can pull my 31ft gooseneck trailer(7300# empty) most of the time in 6th gear.

When towing, you really don't want to be using cruise control as you will be shifting gears most of the time. Just let it pull down a little bit on the hills and your gas mileage will be much better. Also drive a little slower. I usually drive around 70, but tested it at 65 on a long trip pulling the trailer and got 1 MPG better mileage. Not a big deal no more than I tow, but it gives you the idea about how to improve mileage.

Dave
 

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I'm not completely up on the 1500's, but I didn't think that configuration was available? I though with the 6.5' bed you could only get the double cab?
I might be wrong, but I think the bed length deal is only with the GMC. Fairly certain the Chevy short bed will be the 6.5' regardless of cab configuration.

My brother has the GMC Sierra with a crew cab and it's only the 5.5' bed. I couldn't handle that! I told him he went with the wrong truck!:wink:

Mine is a 1/2t double cab with the 6.5' bed. I have the 5.3 with the 3:42 rear end, and max tow.
 

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I don't know man. I think the best option for you is to move to a 3/4 ton, even if it's an older one. I you go older you can get another vehicle for daily driving. The post-2001 trucks are super capable, especially if you get a diesel. The 6.0 is a very capable engine too.

I say this because I wouldn't want to be towing at max capacity. I tow around 8k at most which is 8/10ths of the capacity of my truck in it's current set up (2001 silverado 2500hd cc/sb, 4 speed auto, 6.0 vortec, 4.10 gears, 4x4 with the factory hitch and tekonsha p3 brake controller). I wouldn't want to tow a full 10k all the time. Could I? sure, but things will start breaking before to long. You will most likely want to go bigger with the trailer later on, so prepare now (not to mention the price of trucks keeps going up, so save yourself some $$$$ and get one now instead of spending an extra 20k on the same thing you could have got for less)

It's been my experience that the newer trucks ride rougher than old, but maybe thats just me. Trailering smooths the ride out by a lot.

If you are looking for mileage, a diesel is the way to go. You can get the mini-duramax in the silverado 1500, and the silverado HD trucks. I have a 6.0 in my truck. I pulled the 4510, loader, backhoe, and forks plus 16' trailer to a jobsite to help a friend out the other day. I was on a windy, hilly road in wet conditions so I was going slow. It took 1/4 tank of gas to go 24 miles:gaah:. Thats 3 mpg. I can't imagine if I had a full 10k back there. I'm sure a diesel would have been much better. The other thing is the gasser can be a b!tch to get going on a hill- it simply doesn't have the low end power to get the rpm high enough to make real power. A diesel wouldn't have this issue. The mini-duramax is reported to get astonishing mpg on the highway, so there is that too.

Just my thoughts. Take it how you will, and I wish you luck on your search.
 

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Corndog Hater
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Discussion Starter #11
How much more capacity does the new truck have over the old one? Does it move you at least 1K up?
The max tow only gives you an extra 400lbs in GVWR and about 200-300lbs in payload capacity. But, that would be a cushion as this point. BTW, the weights I’m using for my kids in calculating my numbers is for when they are adults, not what they actually weigh now.



Sounds like you have everything dialed in and working great. I see no reason whatsoever not to go with the max tow truck you are talking about.

To answer one of your questions - E rated tires will make a world of difference. You said you feel very comfortable now on the highway - E rated tires will make enough of a difference to make you very comfortable even with the wind.

The only drawback will be a slightly rougher ride when not towing. A cure for that - if you have the initative - is to run a higher tire pressure when towing than not - say 50# towing and 40# for daily driving. But once you get used to running the tires at any pressure you will soon forget all about it - unless you are on rt 219 down by the PA border.......(like I87 used to be).

Get the 1/2 ton max tow and have them outfit it with E rated tires and trailer on.
Thanks Stan. I figured I would buy a set of E rated tires and run them in the towing months then go back to the stock tires the rest of the year. I figure why get rid of the perfectly good stock tires. If I felt I needed to make an adjustment this summer, I was going to bump up air pressures in my truck tires, but didn’t feel I needed to. So I have no problem doing that with a set of E rated tires.

You wouldn’t be referring to 219 going through Limestone, would you? That stretch is bad enough to chip a tooth!


Kenny, you can get a crew cab with either the 5.5’ bed, or the 6.5’ bed in the 1500. My thinking is to get a remaining 2018 or a slightly used 2017-2018. I’m not sure if the new 2019’s are configured the same. As of now, I’m not a fan of the styling.


Also, when I say I’m at max, I mean in regards to my GVWR and payload. I’ve got 2,000lbs before I hit the “max towing capacity” of a max tow equipped Chevy/GMC. I purposely left off the length and weights of the camper because I have come across too many folks who see the numbers and immediately say, “3/4 ton”. No offense meant to anyone!

The other thing that irritates me about the 3/4 tons is that there is never any dealer/manufacturer incentives on them, and the manufacturers won’t lease them. Apparently it is assumed they will be beat to death. And from what I’ve seen on the dealer lots, that may be accurate. Also, the majority are diesels and that’s not what I want. The amount I drive does not warrant the extra expense. And in this area, any used 3/4 ton on a lot is priced like it’s plated in gold. Unfortunately, the price of a new one, equipped how we want, is not what we are willing to spend on a vehicle, so it will be a used one, if we go the 3/4 ton route.
 

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Well first I would get a Ford. But really I would do the max tow option for the rear ends the cooling and the other options. If you’re within the tow capacity of the half ton it certainly would be more convenient to drive around every other day you’re not towing. If I was to go out and look at one of my sons new F150s I would bet the max tow rating on them is very close to what my 2000 F250 was. My 2012 F250 might be double what the old one was. It is very hard to just go by half ton or three-quarter ton nowadays. Besides weight I think wheelbase is just as important so I would think the longer box would be better.

The other advantages you are doing it properly with the correct hitch and if the truck has trailer sway control I can tell you that it works. One summer we hauled 280 loads with my 14k dump trailer. It was a 2 mile run each time and a couple times I had it too heavy in back. They scared the crap out of me in the old truck. I had one like that with the new truck and instead of 10 swerves and then slow way down it was one.

My 2 cents.
 

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Well first I would get a Ford. But really I would do the max tow option for the rear ends the cooling and the other options. If you’re within the tow capacity of the half ton it certainly would be more convenient to drive around every other day you’re not towing. If I was to go out and look at one of my sons new F150s I would bet the max tow rating on them is very close to what my 2000 F250 was. My 2012 F250 might be double what the old one was. It is very hard to just go by half ton or three-quarter ton nowadays. Besides weight I think wheelbase is just as important so I would think the longer box would be better.

The other advantages you are doing it properly with the correct hitch and if the truck has trailer sway control I can tell you that it works. One summer we hauled 280 loads with my 14k dump trailer. It was a 2 mile run each time and a couple times I had it too heavy in back. They scared the crap out of me in the old truck. I had one like that with the new truck and instead of 10 swerves and then slow way down it was one.

My 2 cents.

My F250 also has the trailer sway control built in. A really great feature. It did not have the OEM brake controller when I got it and I considered taking the P3 Tekonsha out of the old F150 and put it in the F250, but the trailer sway control convinced me to go OEM. I actually spent less on the OEM model than I did the Tekonsha. It was no problem installing it, but I had to go to the dealer to get it turned on.

Dave

Dave
 

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My F250 also has the trailer sway control built in. A really great feature. It did not have the OEM brake controller when I got it and I considered taking the P3 Tekonsha out of the old F150 and put it in the F250, but the trailer sway control convinced me to go OEM. I actually spent less on the OEM model than I did the Tekonsha. It was no problem installing it, but I had to go to the dealer to get it turned on.

Dave

Dave
Agreed. My 12 has the integrated controller. The old one just had an add on so you rotated the dial and that is how hard the trailer brakes work. The integrated’s are wonderful because it senses how much brake pressure you apply and calculate that into whatever you have it set out as well. It makes a big difference for not locking up tires or giving it a lot of breaking if required.
 

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Yes Jamie - down around Limestone NY. I remember the first time I was on I-87 the first time driving big truck in an all Freightliner (is freight shaker) I honestly thought the doors were going to fall off.

About the tires - I know with Ford you can get E rated tires as a factory option. If the truck doesn’t have them on the lot the dealer can do the switch for you. No real need to buy a second set unless you want to.

When I had the E rated tires in my old pickup I ran them at 42# when empty and the ride was nice enough and they wore perfectly.

What was odd to me when I bought my previous truck new - it had the max tow option with the extra leaf spring on the rear, heavy duty spring mounts, upgraded sway bar, larger trans cooler, more reduced steering gear, plus some other stuff. But it came with P rated tires - just didn’t make sense. Those tires were like driving on marshmallows even when empty. I would never pull a trailer of any size with those tires on the roads around here.
 

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...neither my wife or I, really want a 3/4 ton as a daily driver primarily due to gas mileage, size, and ride comfort. My truck sees no more than 10,000 miles per year. This past camping season, I towed our trailer no more than 1,700 miles...
I am not going to give any towing advice, simply going to touch on the cost of gas as a factor of purchase and why I believe that it should not.

Using factory claimed mileage for the configurations you mentioned the 1500 15mpg city and 21mpg highway. 2500 12mpg city and 16mpg highway.

I'm also going to utilize the average cost of "premium" gas in Buffalo, NY at $3.23/gal according to gasbuddy. In MI that would be approx. 91 octane

The greater of the differences is the the highway efficiency of the 1500 at 5mpg more than the 2500. So let us assume that you do all highway driving for those 10,000 miles. The 1500 will use 476gal. of gas and the 2500 will use 625gal. That being a difference of 149gal.

149gal. @ $3.23/gal = $481.27 over the course of a year.

I believe the cost of gas should be a non-factor when considering the purchase of a truck as it is not there intended purpose to be fuel efficient
 

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Whatever you do get the lowest gear ratio you can get. I have 3.73 for my ford f150 and I would have gotten 4.10 if it was a option. Makes a world of difference when towing heavy. You can add air bags in the rear for stability and use a brake controller. Whatever you do please keep the loads well within the capability of the truck. It can be very scary to be pushing those limits. By the book my truck can tow 9,000Lbs but I would never get that much. Towing 6,000lbs is a enough for my truck.
 

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Jamie, as long as you set the towing equipment up to be the best, either truck will be fine, assuming you are not already pushing the GVWR, which as conscientious and cautious as you are and the fact you love your family and genuinely care about your fellow man and women on the road, I doubt you would take such chances.

Reality is that the control of the tow vehicle is critically important and that can be achieved with either the 1/2 ton or 3/4 ton. There is no question, the 3/4 ton is built for being the "Work Truck" from a suspension, brakes, starting, stopping and "working" perspective. A 3 hour tow is likely 175 miles or less in length and you are not pushing it on a deadline and running hard, but rather using the truck for leisure. Just remember that famous 3 hour cruise which led to a T.V. Show.......(You should at least remember the re-runs, although you are too young for the actual show, probably)

Just sit right back And you'll hear a tale, A tale of a fateful trip, That started from this N.Y. port Aboard this tiny truck,
The mate was a mighty SURVEY man and as a skipper brave and sure, Four passengers set sail that day For a 3 hour tour, a 3 hour tour
The weather started getting rough, The tiny truck was tossed, If not for the courage of the fearless crew, The trailer would be lost, the trailer would be lost

:laugh:

I have hauled stuff all over this country from Corvette's to Corvette Parts to Race cars to parts, heavy equipment and pieces of all the above. I have hauled everything from the 7 x 14 enclosed cargo trailer to the 102" x 53 foot double stacked professional race car trailer. The larger the load and the longer the trip, the more crucial the biggest practical towing vehicle.

Every time I ever had a problem towing something was when I was driving other peoples equipment and they had it mismatched. Always too large a trailer for the tow vehicle and that makes the towing a terrible experience. The moment you feel the trailer controlling the tow vehicle, whether its on a down hill grade, trying to climb a hill or the worse scenario, in a long down grade and you are wondering if you are going to need the "Truck Run Offs" to stop the rig, that's never the scenario you want to be in with your family and loved ones.

Since your towing is all leisure, you need to make sure the experience isn't stressful regardless of the trip. Always start with The best possible hitch to equalize the load and brake box and brakes to always make the stopping a sure footed experience is critical. Then comes tires. The moment you over load tires, you build heat, which always leads to shortening the tires useful and practical life. Tire failures are often the cause of loss of control. Never take a chance on tires. Always have more tire rating than you need, always replace tires on the tow vehicle and the trailer the moment that they are in their last 20% of useful life. Never wait until the tires are in their last 10% of life as that is when the failure rate increases dramatically. Always replace tires in pairs at a minimum and ideally in sets.

As long as the trailer loaded for actual use, with the hitch properly distributing weight is not at 90% or more of GVWR for the tow vehicle loaded for use, you will be fine.

Also, always run your rig on the scales to verify the weight and also get the actual weight per axle. The brake down of load distribution is very important. The other thing I have noticed is that the recreational trailer manufacturers know that weight is a big issue with those buyers paying attention (maybe one in five consumers) so they publish their trailer weights at the very basic equipped trailer. I can't tell you how many times we would take a trailer we were told weighed 8,800lbs and found it actually weighed 9,400 lbs, 9,600 lbs.

I am sure you have scaled your rig, loaded with fresh water, some gray and black water and the truck fully fueled. Make sure it has the groceries, the generator, etc. It's amazing how people weigh their new trailer on the way home and then take it home and load it for the trip and are shocked at how different it tows after loaded with the stuff needed for camping

That upgraded nice mattress option, adds weight. The larger water heater for faster cycling times, adds weight, the nicer trim wood, adds weight. That bigger refrigerator and the second refrig for outside, yep, more weight. The reclining chairs in the living area are much heavier than those that don't. So that's why it's critical to always weigh the vehicles yourself to know what the items weigh.

Every gallon of liquid adds about 7 pounds to the rig on average, and with trailers now carrying 80, 100, 120 even 140 gallons of fresh water, that's another 1,000 pounds of weight being towed. There are situations when you are dry camping where you will need to go in loaded with fresh water. Those situations are usually down lower quality roads. The campground at the end of the asphalt road with concrete parking pads is going to have all the utilities at the site. The National Forest down the two track full of pot holes, bumps and washboard gravel roads are the ones you will be going into loaded with fresh water. Worst roads, biggest loads. Not that it happens often, but it happens.

Also, don't forget, when you run the truck and trailer to the scales, you need to add the 110 pounds for Mrs. CP and the weight of growing kids, the dog, the electronics the dog and kids need to bring to survive. Pretty soon, its easy for the actual weight to be 500 pounds more than how it scaled when you alone ran the rig across the scales. 500 pounds here, 500 pounds there and pretty soon, it's another half a ton...................:dunno:

Always buy quality, never compromise in any hitch related component as the the weakest link is usually the first failure point. For example, the 2 5/16th ball can have a weight rating from 5,000 lbs to 12,000 lbs depending upon the maker of the ball, the size of the ball shank,even the threads. The ball mount, which slides into the receiver, same thing. Always buy quality like Reese, Drawtite, etc. While failures of these are rare, the issues I have seen being in the hitch business came from the cheap imports. Even details like the hitch pin, in an effort to prevent theft of the ball mount, some people will use a low priced "locking pin" and they are in some cases made of cheap steel.

The towing protocol years ago used to be when you reached your destination and dropped your trailer, you pulled the ball mount out of the receiver on your rear bumper and either locked it in the front compartment of the trailer, the truck tool box, etc. but you didn't leave them sticking out of the back of the tow vehicle 12", 15" from the bumper so people could run into them when walking past in a parking lot, or on the street, etc. Not only are they usually greasy, it's a major knee knocker and leg injury source for those who run into it. Now, that "custom" of pulling the hitch head and storing it is lost on most who tow as it requires effort and takes a minute or two and requires being considerate of others........:dunno:

Jamie, if you are getting into the heavy tag trailers, here is information which is critical to be aware of and clearly understand. This is a critical point so often lost on people towing and putting trailers behind vehicles.

The Class IV hitch has a weight carrying hitch load of 10,000 pounds, which means the tongue weight should be 1,000 pounds or less. But put the Class IV hitch into a Weight Distributing Load Limit of 14,000lbs with a 1,400 pound hitch tongue weight limit.

The Class V hitch is limited to a weight carrying hitch load of 12,000 lbs, which means a tongue weight limit of 1,200 pounds or less. But it is rated for a Weight Distributing Hitch load of 17,000 lbs with a tongue load limit of 1,700 lbs.

That's the importance of the Weight Distributing Hitch equipment, it properly transfers the weight off the trailer tongue and moves it to the axles of the vehicles, making the load much more balanced. Of course, it's important that the hitch be set up correctly and used correctly, but it can increase the load carrying capability and dramatically increase the safe towing safety of the entire rig.

My father towed a 5th wheel to Florida that he spent the winters in. He went to a Duramax Diesel One ton, crew cab full length bed truck. It towed really well and did even better after I upgraded the truck with Bank's engineering system components. But the truck rode hard and it was about 35' long, or so it seemed when driving it for daily use. He got so tired of driving it around town he was planning on buying a mid sized SUV for his regular driver, but he never got the chance. He woke up one day not feeling well and a few months later was dead from cancer at 70.

I found a buyer who wanted his 5th wheel trailer. They showed up and paid for it and hooked to it with their truck and it struggled to get it down the driveway. I told them to tow the trailer for a half hour with their truck and then come back and try it with the truck with the Duramax. They ended up buying the truck and trailer and sold their truck to someone else, looking to tow.

Every couple of months, I see a truck set up for towing just like that one for sale with low miles and often it's because of similar situations. Someone gets sick or passes away and makes the rig or truck available. They still command top dollar and usually sell very quickly, but they are worth keeping an eye out for. You just need to be able to act immediately when you find them as the person with either cash or a pre arranged loan will usually get the deal.

I am sure you will do the safe thing and the right thing. :bigthumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I am not going to give any towing advice, simply going to touch on the cost of gas as a factor of purchase and why I believe that it should not.

Using factory claimed mileage for the configurations you mentioned the 1500 15mpg city and 21mpg highway. 2500 12mpg city and 16mpg highway.

I'm also going to utilize the average cost of "premium" gas in Buffalo, NY at $3.23/gal according to gasbuddy. In MI that would be approx. 91 octane

The greater of the differences is the the highway efficiency of the 1500 at 5mpg more than the 2500. So let us assume that you do all highway driving for those 10,000 miles. The 1500 will use 476gal. of gas and the 2500 will use 625gal. That being a difference of 149gal.

149gal. @ $3.23/gal = $481.27 over the course of a year.

I believe the cost of gas should be a non-factor when considering the purchase of a truck as it is not there intended purpose to be fuel efficient

Great point and that premium fuel "suggestion" (let's face it, if I'm paying that much for a vehicle and the manufacturer "suggests" to use premium, you better believe I will use premium) is something I have considered.

Gas mileage and cost are funny numbers for me, more of a mental block actually. My 1500 has a 26 gallon fuel tank. I just got gas the other day and paid $2.71/gallon for regular 87 octane. That's $70.46 to fill it, $83.98 for the premium gas (using your number). A 2500 has a 36 gallon tank, $97.56 to fill it at $2.71/gallon. Staring at that pump amount for the 2500 is going to drive me nuts every time I fill up, even if I fill up less often due to the bigger tank. Whereas, with the premium gas, I'm paying more, but it's spread out over the course of the year. The amount I'm looking at at the pump is less at each fill up. That for some reason makes my brain hurt less. I had thought that if I ended up with a 2500, I would fill up in normal driving whenever it got to half a tank, so that the amount I see at each fill up is less. Does that make any sense???:unknown:
 

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Great point and that premium fuel "suggestion" (let's face it, if I'm paying that much for a vehicle and the manufacturer "suggests" to use premium, you better believe I will use premium) is something I have considered.

Gas mileage and cost are funny numbers for me, more of a mental block actually. My 1500 has a 26 gallon fuel tank. I just got gas the other day and paid $2.71/gallon for regular 87 octane. That's $70.46 to fill it, $83.98 for the premium gas (using your number). A 2500 has a 36 gallon tank, $97.56 to fill it at $2.71/gallon. Staring at that pump amount for the 2500 is going to drive me nuts every time I fill up, even if I fill up less often due to the bigger tank. Whereas, with the premium gas, I'm paying more, but it's spread out over the course of the year. The amount I'm looking at at the pump is less at each fill up. That for some reason makes my brain hurt less. I had thought that if I ended up with a 2500, I would fill up in normal driving whenever it got to half a tank, so that the amount I see at each fill up is less. Does that make any sense???:unknown:
I had my last F150 for 9 years with the 36 gallon tank. I now have a 23 gallon tank and really miss the big tank. But I am getting around 4 mpg better but still isn’t a wash.

It costs the same to run either truck you know.....

It surprises me that GM doesn’t offer an option of the 36 gal tank like Ford does on any truck.
 
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