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Following up a post on the tractor with hrs. I've had several of the yanmar John Deere tractors. I would think that several thousand hrs. would not be uncommon. One weak spot of the 1025r is absence of a lower step or hand hold, therefore the weak spot is the tilt steering. Mine with 565 hrs has play and I tightened it up some but the bushing probably need replacing which runs about $200. I may do this in future. I added a step and now there is no pressure on a handhold...but anyway to the point. With all the emphasis on safety, everything you do with these tractors in safety leads to an engine shutdown. While I'm not advocating anyone doing anything to their safety, this cannot and I mean cannot be good for the engine. Most experienced users will tell you that the worst thing you can do to a diesel is constantly starting and stopping them, but this is absolutely what is going on with these compacts. I understand that this limits corporate liability and possibly provides personal protection but increasing shortens the life of the equipment. Naturally this would also be of corporate advantage. I'm not looking for any conspiracies but proper use of operation is the only key to a long lasting value. This might also be not letting multiple users on the machine, or an inexperience operator, or someone indeference to maintenance. One thing in our area is key is keeping moisture of the tractor when not in use. A lot of considerations when trying to maximize value. My take from Kentucky.
 

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As far as frequent shutdown of diesel engines - take UPS and their delivery trucks as an example.

The drivers must shut their truck off every time they stop. I don’t know how many stops a typical city route has but my rural guy says he averages 85 stops a day. So that’s 85 times the engine is stopped and started each and every day. I’m sure UPS has done their research and find the fuel savings override any potential engine problems from doing this.

And the engines in these trucks have a turbo where a lot of our little Yanmars do not. With a turbo engine it was always prudent to let it idle a bit after a hard pull to let the turbo cool some before shutdown.

The new F-150 fitted with a diesel has the automatic stop/start thing. In a city environment that would mean possibly dozens of shutdown/start cycles a day. I guess the Ford engineers find that OK as well.

I am in the habit od idling my tractor for about 10-15 seconds before shutdown and feel that is plenty enough - probably not even neccessary at all.
 

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I see where UPS has gone back to gasoline engines in their delivery trucks … Perhaps gas is more economical to maintain ?

G
 

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While I'm not advocating anyone doing anything to their safety, this cannot and I mean cannot be good for the engine. Most experienced users will tell you that the worst thing you can do to a diesel is constantly starting and stopping them, but this is absolutely what is going on with these compacts.
Is that going on? I've had my machine for just short of 5 years now. I may have tripped a safety feature that resulted in an engine shutdown 5 or 6 times. So this happens to me just about once a year.
 

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With my 2025r i can put it in neutral and set the brake and get off of it to let idle. Can’t you do this with the 1 series?
 

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With my 2025r i can put it in neutral and set the brake and get off of it to let idle. Can’t you do this with the 1 series?
Of course you can. You just have to pick your poison. These aren't semi-trucks, you shouldn't let the engine idle for long periods (although some experienced diesel mechanics will tell you that even idling semis for long periods is not good for them).

Also, I think everyone would agree that constant stops and starts probably isn't the greatest either.

So what are you to do? For a lot of us, most tractor tasks don't require much run time. I have a small storage space which requires that I move the tractor to do most things. So I start it, let it run a minute or two, pull it out of the garage and shut it off. Same when parking it. Likewise when moving brush or something. You pull the tractor around, shut it off, cut and load brush, start it up and haul to the pile.

Frequent starts and stops can't be avoided really. I just use common sense. If the idle time will be less than 5-mins or so I let it run, longer than that I shut it off.
 

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Is that going on? I've had my machine for just short of 5 years now. I may have tripped a safety feature that resulted in an engine shutdown 5 or 6 times. So this happens to me just about once a year.
HAH! You need to have the seat switch on my 2720... lean to the left to check bucket clearance - shutdown. Lean to the right to see where the plow edge is - shutdown. Unweight a butt cheek for any reason - shutdown. It probably happens to be 1 out of 3 times I'm doing something.
 

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HAH! You need to have the seat switch on my 2720... lean to the left to check bucket clearance - shutdown. Lean to the right to see where the plow edge is - shutdown. Unweight a butt cheek for any reason - shutdown. It probably happens to be 1 out of 3 times I'm doing something.
Sounds like an adjustment issue. Maybe remove and put a thin piece of rigid plastic above the switch to distribute your weight more evenly? Not sure what it looks like on yours, but you get the idea.

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Following up a post on the tractor with hrs. I've had several of the yanmar John Deere tractors. I would think that several thousand hrs. would not be uncommon. One weak spot of the 1025r is absence of a lower step or hand hold, therefore the weak spot is the tilt steering. Mine with 565 hrs has play and I tightened it up some but the bushing probably need replacing which runs about $200. I may do this in future. I added a step and now there is no pressure on a handhold...but anyway to the point. With all the emphasis on safety, everything you do with these tractors in safety leads to an engine shutdown. While I'm not advocating anyone doing anything to their safety, this cannot and I mean cannot be good for the engine. Most experienced users will tell you that the worst thing you can do to a diesel is constantly starting and stopping them, but this is absolutely what is going on with these compacts. I understand that this limits corporate liability and possibly provides personal protection but increasing shortens the life of the equipment. Naturally this would also be of corporate advantage. I'm not looking for any conspiracies but proper use of operation is the only key to a long lasting value. This might also be not letting multiple users on the machine, or an inexperience operator, or someone indeference to maintenance. One thing in our area is key is keeping moisture of the tractor when not in use. A lot of considerations when trying to maximize value. My take from Kentucky.
You know the good part of all this? When you buy it, it becomes yours. Now you can do whatever you want to the tractor or with it. Some will not like what you do, some will and some just won't care. In the end it is yours to do with as you see fit. It's what I did and really don't care what others say I shouldn't have done. It's mine so I do what I want with it. Main thing I can tell you is, enjoy it and operate safely for you and people around you. My take from Tn.
 

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HAH! You need to have the seat switch on my 2720... lean to the left to check bucket clearance - shutdown. Lean to the right to see where the plow edge is - shutdown. Unweight a butt cheek for any reason - shutdown. It probably happens to be 1 out of 3 times I'm doing something.
Are you tryin' to say that I have a fat arse? :laugh:
 

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Let it warm up sometimes

Of course you can. You just have to pick your poison. These aren't semi-trucks, you shouldn't let the engine idle for long periods (although some experienced diesel mechanics will tell you that even idling semis for long periods is not good for them).

Also, I think everyone would agree that constant stops and starts probably isn't the greatest either.

So what are you to do? For a lot of us, most tractor tasks don't require much run time. I have a small storage space which requires that I move the tractor to do most things. So I start it, let it run a minute or two, pull it out of the garage and shut it off. Same when parking it. Likewise when moving brush or something. You pull the tractor around, shut it off, cut and load brush, start it up and haul to the pile.

Frequent starts and stops can't be avoided really. I just use common sense. If the idle time will be less than 5-mins or so I let it run, longer than that I shut it off.
I think that describes many of us but I try to find a way to periodically use a tractor enough to really warm up the oil, hydraulics etc. and hope that's cooking off some of the condensation that's built up in the systems. If I feed hay, a tractor may only run 15 minutes but I don't shut it down at all during that period. If it's cold, I may put some cardboard over the radiator to help it warm up. That's still not enough to get the hydraulics warm so on the weekend, I may run it longer. That's not always possible, especially this year when it seems like it's rained every weekend but it's a goal anyway. Our tractors are in unheated sheds so they assume ambient temperature when parked. If your garage is heated, that's certainly better but our poor tractors aren't so favored. A tractor that hasn't been started for a couple of weeks may get started and let run long enough to heat up some, charge the battery etc. even if it's not moved.

I agree with the concept of starting a diesel, run it long enough for everything to get to operating temp without stopping and then shut it off but sometimes that's just not going to happen. At least starting a warm diesel is easier on everything than cranking one that's cold.

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Discussion Starter #14
My post was not to create controversy....folks have commented and wanted to know how to get values out of their equipment. It seems like operation and safety sometimes compete. I understand the shutdown for safety but at what cost to the equipment. All this jerking and jumping is going to play a role in longevity, however being an old timer I want the most use for the longest period of time at the most economical cost. While I know JD is also in the consumable market...there's really no reason one can't get their money's worth. Operating the diesel requires a different set skill and some additional maintence to get your money's worth.
 

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HAH! You need to have the seat switch on my 2720... lean to the left to check bucket clearance - shutdown. Lean to the right to see where the plow edge is - shutdown. Unweight a butt cheek for any reason - shutdown. It probably happens to be 1 out of 3 times I'm doing something.
A short jumper wire with two female spade terminals fixed that problem on my 1025R. Disclaimer: I am not responsible if you injure or kill yourself, you actually did not read this here, you just dreamed it.:lol:
 

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Diesel or gas I try to never shut off a engine until it reach's operating temp. As far as idling my 1025 I avoid it except during warm up and shut down. If I stop to do something for 5 or 10 min. I bump it up to 2000-2200, longer then that I shut off as long as it's up to temp. Just my 2 cents.
 
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A short jumper wire with two female spade terminals fixed that problem on my 1025R. Disclaimer: I am not responsible if you injure or kill yourself, you actually did not read this here, you just dreamed it.:lol:
The seat switch is one of those safety interlocks that while sometimes being a PITA, I leave it connected. I cannot count how many times I've hopped out of the seat in a hurry, the engine shuts off, and I am puzzled for a second as to why it happened.

In all those situations, without the seat switch I would have dismounted a running tractor that was still in gear - which isn't a good thing to do.
 

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Diesel or gas I try to never shut off a engine until it reach's operating temp. As far as idling my 1025 I avoid it except during warm up and shut down. If I stop to do something for 5 or 10 min. I bump it up to 2000-2200, longer then that I shut off as long as it's up to temp. Just my 2 cents.
Wow... my tractor would be running for days trying to get up to temperature, especially in the winter. :) Seriously, even in the summer I have ran my tractor for an hour doing loader work and the lower radiator hose was still cool to the touch. I think the only time I was able to get it to start warming up was after blowing 28" of snow for a couple hours. I don't mow with my tractor and it just never seems to warm up. I once had plans to install a temperature gauge but then the more I thought about it I figured it was a waste to go to all that trouble to install a gauge that would read nothing most of the time.

I even noticed on a lot of TTWT's videos, his 1025R's temperature gauge stays over in the cold region.

So doing as you suggests seems like an impossibility.
 

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The seat switch is one of those safety interlocks that while sometimes being a PITA, I leave it connected. I cannot count how many times I've hopped out of the seat in a hurry, the engine shuts off, and I am puzzled for a second as to why it happened.

In all those situations, without the seat switch I would have dismounted a running tractor that was still in gear - which isn't a good thing to do.
On my hills it's better to leave it in gear while running so it won't "walk" off. :laugh:
 
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The seat switch is one of those safety interlocks that while sometimes being a PITA, I leave it connected. I cannot count how many times I've hopped out of the seat in a hurry, the engine shuts off, and I am puzzled for a second as to why it happened.

In all those situations, without the seat switch I would have dismounted a running tractor that was still in gear - which isn't a good thing to do.
I have a 2720 too. First time I jumped off while it was idling in gear it died. Puzzled me.
I used to do the same on the 4610 I had before and it didn't shut off. Rarely switched the 4610 out of gear. Just left it and used it in low gear all the time.
I would agree that being in neutral is safer but in gear is not a great danger. I don't know about you and others but neither one of my tractors with hydro will move while in gear till I push one of the directional pedals down. Not like a car with an automatic trans that will start moving if idling in gear.

I have not had any issues with the my butt moving around in the seat killing the tractor. Maybe my butt is bigger or I'm fatter?:laugh:
I have had issues with the wire terminal under the tractor that senses if the tractor is in gear. It gets loose and even tho its still on the switch at times if I get off while its in neutral the tractor will die. I have to lie on the ground push the terminal on the switch and I'm good to go again. I finally put a zip ties around the terminal boot to keep it in place tighter. This solved the issue.
 
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