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Discussion Starter #1
Can you steer into the same direction you feel your tractor tilting, to stop a roll over, or does it happen way too fast? I haven't experienced, but would like any advice to hopefully keep from facing the ground? Thanks.
 

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I know there are SEVERAL members here who have experienced this. I’m glad I’m not one of them. I can tell you this. It happens now. Not slow, not medium, but now. You only have one shot at this thing called life. Why risk it all? I’d be willing to bet we have a few members who who can’t post about their experiences here anymore. Know what I mean?

I’m sure other will chime in.

I moved this to the General forum where more will see and add to this conversation. :good2:
 

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I have not rolled a tractor but have came extremely close a few times. From the experiences I had, there was no time to steer towards anything and I'm not sure it would have mattered. What I did to stop the roll over from occurring a couple of times was dropping the loader rapidly which was my instinct considering my hand was on the lever already and the weight on the loader was the cause for my trouble. There has been other occasions when my only instinct was to grab hold of the ROPS and hang on for a ride, luckily the tractor settled down on those occasions and didn't go over.
 

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Get that loader now NOW

I have not rolled a tractor but have came extremely close a few times. From the experiences I had, there was no time to steer towards anything and I'm not sure it would have mattered. What I did to stop the roll over from occurring a couple of times was dropping the loader rapidly which was my instinct considering my hand was on the lever already and the weight on the loader was the cause for my trouble. There has been other occasions when my only instinct was to grab hold of the ROPS and hang on for a ride, luckily the tractor settled down on those occasions and didn't go over.
I'm in the same boat-never yet rolled one but definitely had some close calls. I'm guessing that if you are sliding down a hill sideways you MIGHT be able to save it by steering straight down the hill. I think once you leave the ground on a slide it's too late.

With the loader causing the issue you can save it, particularly if you are lifting or moving slowly. You want to ease into a potential problem and hurry out.

The best practice is to plan ahead enough so you don't have to correct a dangerous situation. That includes knowing the ground you are on as well as the capabilities of your equipment and, your own capabilities. I've seen people baling hay on slopes that I want no part of but they knew exactly what they could do without a problem.

Treefarmer
 

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I have not rolled my 2032R, but, I’ve come close. If my land was just a tad hilly, chances are, I would have rolled her. Gentlemen, if you are doing any type of work, especially with your loader, on any increase in grade, go slow or better, skip it.
 

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ROPS up, seatbelt on. ROPS down, seatbelt off and have a bunch of luck you don’t get under a rolling machine. :thumbup1gif:
 

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There are way to many ways to tip a tractor to say what would or wouldn't work. It might work in some circumstances and not in others. My own *guess* is that if you have a wheel come up off the ground then no amount of steering is going to save you. At that point you've already shifted the center of gravity far enough that steering won't fix it. If you're lucky you'd have the presence of mind to drop whatever implements you have available to lower that center of gravity in a hurry.

Then you can go change out your undies, grab a beer and have a story to tell about "the time I almost rolled the tractor...". :laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Should have mentioned not using a FEL

Should have mentioned not using a FEL, but mowing a right of way near highway. I've read you should mow back and forth instead of mowing with the direction of traffic, but it's a state highway, and I wouldn't feel comfortable driving onto the shoulder numerous times with a 300 foot road frontage, lots of traffic! The salesman didn't think I would have any trouble, but that leaves room for doubt. I cannot find any information about degrees of incline before a tip would occur, I'm sure a lot of variables are at play? Thanks for your replies.
 

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I cannot find any information about degrees of incline before a tip would occur, I'm sure a lot of variables are at play? Thanks for your replies.
You will not find such info published, way to many variables as you stated, from what implement is attached to the operators weight.
 

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Should have mentioned not using a FEL, but mowing a right of way near highway. I've read you should mow back and forth instead of mowing with the direction of traffic, but it's a state highway, and I wouldn't feel comfortable driving onto the shoulder numerous times with a 300 foot road frontage, lots of traffic! The salesman didn't think I would have any trouble, but that leaves room for doubt. I cannot find any information about degrees of incline before a tip would occur, I'm sure a lot of variables are at play? Thanks for your replies.
Actually, not having a FEL helps keep the center of gravity lower. Do you plan to have loaded tires or rear wheel weights?

What is the approximate incline of the bank you will be mowing? It should be easy to easy to estimate with a smart phone or even using a string.
 

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My own *guess* is that if you have a wheel come up off the ground then no amount of steering is going to save you.
It's not necessarily non-correctable. I know a few people who have scared themselves sh--less by raising a wheel off the ground and then correcting to bring it back down. It's not the kind of maneuver you want to get in the habit of repeating.
 

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With nothing but the MMM on your tractor you have the best ballast you'll get. If you think you "have" to mow the ditch line start slow and do the easy part first and go from there. Listen to your "pucker factor". If you don't think you can do it...don't. There is no way of saying what will work and what won't on what you asked.

There were times when I was in that situation and I had to steer into the downhill side and other times I had to steer into the uphill side. Other time I had to back into both of them directions, meaning either back downhill or back uphill. Also just because you have 4WD don't think it will save you. If you turn uphill chances are the front end will start spinning and you won't go anywhere. Or the front end will slid downhill.

Last week I had a degree level with me while mowing my place. I mow anywhere from 30° to 40° hills sideways. When I mow at them places I sit on the high side fender doing it. I didn't do it the first time I got a tractor to mow them places, it took me going slow and a little at a time, over time. In other words it took me a whole season to get to where I could do it and even then I got the tractor stuck to where I had to use a truck or towels to get out. To many times I care to remember.

Also I mow my hills where it's bad with the left side facing downhill. I have a 60" deck and because it sticks out farther on the left side it has saved me a time or two where it started to tip that way and the deck kept it from going all the way over. 'Course it also threw me off the tractor when it happened. At that place I was determined to mow it so I would lay across the floor of the tractor and use my hands to operate the tractor go pedals and walk beside the tractor on the downhill side. It's to the point now I can sit in the seat and mow at that place. I also go very slow knowing things can go wrong and I'm prepared for it.

I've also found out that when you do get stuck it's best to use the back wheels to get out as far as traction is concerned. They are bigger and have more traction. Once they start slipping...hang on or get off till you get to know the area. There are also times that going through places that speed is the answer and other times it a very slow pace is the answer. I can back out of a hill at times better when I have the front end facing downhill. What I'm trying to say is when mowing sideways and things start going wrong I'll make the tractor face downhill by backing uphill. It's a learning curve only you can figure out. Remember, dry grass has more traction then bare dirt or wet grass.

Didn't mean for this to turn into a book but there are so many variables and I've just covered a few. My tractor does not have a cab and when mowing I only have the MMM on and all 4 tires filled with liquid. No other weights except me.

Forgot to mention, the dif lock can also help you when the front end starts spinning when going sideways.
 

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Others may disagree with me but.... If you think you are going to be in a position where the tractor might tip, DON'T get in that position!! Yeah, I know it's easier said than done, but consider some other way of doing what you need to get done. Also, WEAR YOUR SEATBELT and MAKE SURE THE ROPS IS IN THE UPRIGHT AND LOCKED POSITION.

One thing I had drilled into my head during my Jeeping/Offroad days - if you start to go over, keep your limbs "inside the cage". Don't think you're going to stop the roll over by sticking your arm out. You won't. It is gut reaction to try and do that, but you have to train yourself mentally to keep saying "if I go over, hang on to the wheel".

I think that a lot of us on here equate roll over accidents with improper use of the FEL. It doesn't sound like you'll be using the FEL while mowing which is good. But, I think that seeing some pics of the area that you're concerned about would be helpful. There's a lot of guys (and gals) on here that have all sorts of varying land conditions and the chances are good that someone has conditions similar to yours and can give some helpful advice on how to accomplish what you need to get done.

I have about 330' of road frontage that I mow with my walk behind Gravely tractor. It has a shallow ditch in it. I mow parallel to the road (and watch for traffic to try to avoid throwing anything out from the mower deck). My solution - I don't mow in the ditch part of the road frontage. It's off the road about 4' and the weeds don't bother me, so the heck with it. "One of these days" I'd like to put a pipe in the ditch and fill it in. But that project is low on the priority list.

POST PICS!! :good2:
 

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Should have mentioned not using a FEL, but mowing a right of way near highway. I've read you should mow back and forth instead of mowing with the direction of traffic, but it's a state highway, and I wouldn't feel comfortable driving onto the shoulder numerous times with a 300 foot road frontage, lots of traffic! The salesman didn't think I would have any trouble, but that leaves room for doubt. I cannot find any information about degrees of incline before a tip would occur, I'm sure a lot of variables are at play? Thanks for your replies.
What size tractor are you cutting with? I (and likely others) assume your referring to mowing with a sub compact or compact tractor. For years I bushhhogged with tractors we had on the farm such as a IH 1066, IH 674, or a Massey Ferguson 135. Basically a small, medium, and larger sized ag tractors. With those I pretty much bushhhogged any ground I wanted only needing to use caution in regards to tipping over very few times. Once I purchased my first compact tractor and started bushhogging with it I QUICKLY learned compact tractors are in a league of their own when it comes to turning over. Not to scare you or anyone but compact tractors are the most dangerous tractors I have operated and requires a different level of care than I was used too. There are MANY areas I had cut for years with other tractors that I have not been able to with any of the compact tractors I have owned. I purchased my 3520 with R4 tires and there was a lot of places I could no longer cut with it even though I had always been able to do so with the previous compact tractors I owned. I switched to R1 tires and rims that allowed me to widen the tractors stance and now I can cut those areas again. Its all about wheelbase so IMO it would help to know if your cutting with a 1 series or a 5 series for example. When you mentioned "right of way" and "highway" I also assumed you were referring to mowing with a bushhog/rotary cutter. Is the road frontage your wanting to mow an area your intending to mow regularly using a mmm or rear finishing mower? If that's the case and your cutting with a sub compact or compact tractor (if possible for your machine and mower setup) it may be well worth the investment to purchase wheel spacers. It's rather remarkable IMO how much stability can be gained by adding just a couple of inches to your tread width.
 

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Hi,

You got good advice from jgayman and treefarmer.

Everyone on this thread has had "close calls"-- including rear or front wheel "lift", loss of traction, or implement "bottoming out" (like a mmm).

Unfortunately, tipping is an "occupational hazard" of owning and operating a tractor.

A few other tips:

Walk the area you plan to till, mow, etc. to detect:

gopher or squirrel holes-- even on "table top flat" ground a network of deep gopher holes can roll or flip a tractor with a high center of gravity.
stumps- if they protrude they can hang up implements-- forcing you to raise on a slope or turn-- changing your center of gravity and potentially causing wheel slip or a loss of traction
old roots- like a gopher hole, they can collapse, causing your tractor to have one wheel in a hole and the other "in the air"
fencing/posts-- self explanatory-- binding up in the axles or implement or PTO shaft causing you to stop or turn on a hill to free yourself

Adding weight or ballast to lower the center of gravity does ensure your tractor is more forgiving and provides you more "notice" of a potential tipping scenario.

More ballast typically will cause a tractor to "slip" or "skid" sideways before rolling over-- but not always.

Any skidding or "crabbing" on a side slope is a sign you are not in complete control.

I've said it over and over again-- our JD CUTS have lots of torque and horsepower and are relatively light in terms of weight.

What that means in simple terms is that the torque and power tend to promote more speed on up slope and side slope.

Speed reduces your reaction time because you are travelling over more ground per hour.

Power and torque with a hydro-static trans also causes different responses from a car, pickup, or large truck because the response is not engine throttle based-- it is based on the position of the "forward" or "reverse" pedal-- WHICH HAVE NO FEEDBACK-- the tractor will simply "go" or "stop" when it meets too much resistance.

Good luck!
 

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I have not rolled my 2032R, but, I’ve come close. If my land was just a tad hilly, chances are, I would have rolled her. Gentlemen, if you are doing any type of work, especially with your loader, on any increase in grade, go slow or better, skip it.
The way to handle a bucket load of material on uneven terrain is the same way would operate a fork lift on uneven terrain. Go up and down hills perpendicular to the hill and when doing that go up the hill with the load in front of you and low to the ground. When going down hill, back down the hill with the load in front of you and low to the ground.
 

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I've been very close but never tipped my own tractors. I have had more than one wheel off the ground on more than one occasion. I did extricate a gentleman from underneath a tractor as a firefighter.

I wouldn't recommend it.
 

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Good judgment comes from experience and unfortunately experience comes from bad judgment. I have 30 degree slopes that I now and am completely comfortable doing it but I have been spooked once when we had a lot of rain and I misjudged the condition of the slope. (See my first sentence) My wife won't mow them and I don't want her to. I've had one major scare and it wasn't on a tractor. I was moving dirt at a build site with our John Deere skid loader and got too close to the hole I was filling with the bucket up ready to dump. I tipped forward into the hole with a full bucket and lucky for me the bucket stopped me. My mind played all sorts of end of the world scenarios in the split second that all this took place. All I can say is spend a lot of time getting to know your tractor and stay well within the boundaries of safe operation. I lost more than one neighbor growing up that pushed this boundary and lost, one just recently.

This isn't tractor related but we just lost 2 business owners Saturday to a UTV accident in the black hills caused by speed and poor judgment. I can't tell you how many times I cheated death on a snowmobile in my younger days and feel some guilt for surviving so many when some survive none. Be safe:hi:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for all the suggestions, I have a 3000 series with cab and a 60" mower deck because of numerous trees in the backyard I didn't want to upgrade to a 72". The dealer stated that switching my tires to a wider stance would cause me to run over my grass twice before mowing, does anyone have experience with driving over grass twice, is it really a problem? My BX2200 had a 60" deck and I've landscaped over the years for a deck that size. Wouldn't wheel weights, and fluid in the tires need to be removed if constant rain softens the ground, I think this model weights almost 2,000 pounds more than my BX? I guess removing wheel weights would be better than removing fluid. I forgot my cell has a level indicator, that's a great idea! I'll try to post photos and the degrees I get with my phone. Thanks again.
 

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Tons of good advice on how to squeeze the most angle out of your tractor. Basically you want as little weight above the axles as possible, and especially as little over the front tires as possible. You also want the rears as wide as you can get them. The mower is great weight: heavy, low, and near the rears. The FEL and Cab aren’t your friends here. Regarding the width and weight on the rears making for a less perfect mow... sure, but it’s a safer one. Wheel weights, filled tires, and spacers will help, a lot. I mowed on my stock 1026r and then with with filled tires and 1.5” spacers. Huge difference.

Like Plug, I’ve pulled dead surprised looking folk from under tractors (recovering paramedic). The general story you hear on scene has always been that they thought they had whatever they were doing handled, “They’d done it for years”, and they thought it needed doing. Food for thought (at least for me), because from my POV (after pulling them out and telling their families they are dead) that thing that needed doing (or doing a bit faster) just didn’t look that important in the end. And if these guys, farmers on these tractors all their lives on that same land, couldn’t avoid it in the end then could I? It’s just not worth the risk of riding right up against the ragged edge, eventually something unexpected will happen and you won’t have any safety buffer the absorb it.

Be safe and good luck.
 
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