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What do you folks think about one braking axle on a dual axle trailer. JD 2032 with FEL and 49" tiller would be max load.
 

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Most likely it will be fine, but I preff having brakes on both axles. What is the rating on the trailer?
 

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MY home state requires trailer brakes on ALL axles If the trailer GVW is over 3000lbs. You did not state the trailer's GVW. If over 3000lbs, I would want to be legal in more than just my home state (assuming single axle brakes are legal in your home state). If under 3000lbs, I would not worry about having brakes on all axles. I would go by GVW, not intended load.
 

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I agree with the brakes on both axles.

I don't know what the law is here in PA but I've never heard of or seen a tandem axle trailer with brakes on only one axle.
 

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I'm in the "all axles will have brakes" camp regardless of any laws, little trailer are exempt. It just makes sense. With brakes only on one axle on a tandem axle trailer, you can have failure of one brake and lose all braking effect on one side of the trailer all at once. That could get scary pretty quick depending on the scenario. Brakes on all wheels prevent that from happening.
 

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I like all axles having brakes, myself.

The argument for single vs tandem brakes is usually settled by the bean counters at a trailer manufacturer. If your state requires all axles to have brakes, then so be it. It usually has everything to do with cargo capacity, on the states level. Another argument has to do with breakaway batteries/switches applying a full 12 volts should a breakaway situation arise. Brakes on an "all axles have brakes" setup can lock up with a full 12 volts, causing an out of control skid, whereas a single set of wheels still turning will allow the trailer some semblance of being directionally controlled.

:dunno:
 

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What do you folks think about one braking axle on a dual axle trailer. JD 2032 with FEL and 49" tiller would be max load.
Depends on the tow vehicle. A one ton truck wouldn't have much trouble stopping this. A 1/2 ton may have issues.

My boat trailer only has brakes on the front axle. Surge brakes, as electric brakes dont like being submerged in water on a regular basis .Towed weight is 6,000 lbs. My dodge 2500 stops it fine.
 

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I have an 18' car trailer. Brakes on one axle. While it does a good job, I'd rather have dual axel brakes. One reason, if weight shifts on trailer, it can take pressure off one axel and lose grip where as if you had dual brakes you would maintain brake control. Also on gravel or slick surfaces, the tires lock up and drag. I am currently looking for a equipment trailer with dual brakes.
 
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MY home state requires trailer brakes on ALL axles If the trailer GVW is over 3000lbs. You did not state the trailer's GVW. If over 3000lbs, I would want to be legal in more than just my home state (assuming single axle brakes are legal in your home state). If under 3000lbs, I would not worry about having brakes on all axles. I would go by GVW, not intended load.

Same law here
 

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Here's a listing of each State's requirements: Trailer Brakes | AAA/CAA Digest of Motor Laws


I've been looking at trailers for a few months now and I'm finding that most new trailers are built with brakes on all axles. I suspect it's just a lot easier for them to make sure they meet all States laws that way.
 
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I've never had an issue with brakes on one axle but on 2 axles would be better.
 

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Like others said, check your laws..

If your ordering a new trailer, and do stick with one axle with brakes, get them on the REAR vs front. The rear will be less likely to skid.

My advise is spend the extra $ and get brakes on both axles..
 

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Like others said, check your laws..

If your ordering a new trailer, and do stick with one axle with brakes, get them on the REAR vs front. The rear will be less likely to skid.

My advise is spend the extra $ and get brakes on both axles..
:good2:
 
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