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Discussion Starter #1
Looking at new trailers. Pros and cons of an aluminum 16ft flatbed trailer for hauling a 1025r TLB.
 

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Pros: It won't rust and you'll be the envy of other GTT members. I'd be more envious if it were a 20' and I could haul cars on it.

Cons: Your good buddies and relatives will always want to borrow it. With that comes broken tail lights, trailer plug drug down the highway along with the safety chains, bent tongue from being jack knifed as they can't back up a trailer, flat tires from being overloaded, holes punched through the decking from having heavy items dropped on to it, and you'll always have to figure out who they loaned it to when you need it. You'll only get it back when it needs expensive repairs or it failed a DOT inspection.

Don't ask me how I know all of this....
 

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While a 16' may work, the nominal cost to go longer is money well spent.

I have an 18' trailer with a 2' dovetail to haul my 1025 TLB. In all honesty I wish I had opted for one slightly longer (20' with a dovetail). When I lower the backhoe bucket to the deck and strap it down as required by the DOT, it leaves mere inches of room between the backhoe and the rear gate.
 

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And while Martin is 100% correct.....that's assuming your friends/neighbors/relatives even have a pickup truck. If not, guess whose they will want to borrow along with that trailer. :banghead::laugh:
.

There is always this bumper sticker.
Nope.jpg

yes_this_is_my_truck_no_i_wont_help_you_move_bumper_sticker.jpg
 

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Theres a couple easy fixes to the can I borrow your trailer.

Pintle hitch......throughs a curve ball.

Wire your plug in a fashion that only works with "your" truck...A friend did this for theft reasons...It would fry their truck when plugged in.


But yes...I don't borrow .., I don't loan ... I'm not in the ...business.

I've worked Hard for all the garbage I own. Its mine. The end.

If a friend needs help...My truck ,My trailer...How bout lunch or whatever.
 

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Looking at new trailers. Pros and cons of an aluminum 16ft flatbed trailer for hauling a 1025r TLB.
Any particular model?

7,000 lb or heavier?


Pro would be lighter than steel giving you more capacity for the same type of trailer.

Con would be cost, maybe. :dunno:

I've never had an aluminum trailer, but I hear they are nice.

Probably wouldn't work for me. I haul lots of different stuff on mine, including rock. Not sure I'd want a loader dumping rip-rap into an aluminum trailer.


Will this be just to haul the tractor or do you have other plans as well? A trailer is something that once you have one, you find all kinds of stuff the use it for.


As far as the length goes, your 1025R TLB should fit, but you won't have much room to adjust the tongue weight or carry anything additional.

If the cost isn't prohibitive, I go at least 18'.


I don't worry about the borrowing thing. I just say no.
 

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Aluminum, for sure. With a wooden deck would be my preference. Lighter and no rust. I can’t think of any reasons NOT to choose aluminum over steel, other than cost. IMHO the lack of rust offsets the higher cost by a wide margin.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'm thinking an h&h with a wood deck or an aluma with a wood deck. I have limited storage so I'm planning on selling my utility trailer so this wood be my go to Menards trailer also.

7000lbs, electric breaks,

My biggest concern is limited ability to adjust tongue weight. Instructions say to back on trailer so tractor hood does not get ripped off by wind.

14+2 dovetail or a straight 16 or a 16 tilt/speedloader type.

What is the best for loading?
 

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I’m also looking for a trailer. My tractor guys sell a number of different sizes along with option on steel, and galvanized. The one they had suggested is a galvanized 14x7 with a 5500lb axle with brakes. I’ve done sone research on the galvanizing process and it seem like it would be strong and resistant to rust as it will live outside except in the winter. Anyone with experience with the galvanized?
 

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I have a 20’ 10k . It works but if I were to do over I would get a deck over trailer as the fenders tend to get in the way when you go to load it with a forklift. Now you may say you will never haul anything other than your tractor, but the day will come whe you need to get some land scape or building materials and that could easily be loaded with a forklift but you get to load it by hand.:banghead:

I don’t know if I will ever replace my trailer. But if I do, I will get what they call a low pro dump trailer. It’s a low dump trailer with removable sides that can also haul things like tractors, skid steers, cars, etc. 8’ x20’ with 14k gross.
 

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I'm thinking an h&h with a wood deck or an aluma with a wood deck. I have limited storage so I'm planning on selling my utility trailer so this wood be my go to Menards trailer also.

7000lbs, electric breaks,

My biggest concern is limited ability to adjust tongue weight. Instructions say to back on trailer so tractor hood does not get ripped off by wind.

14+2 dovetail or a straight 16 or a 16 tilt/speedloader type.

What is the best for loading?
Here in the Land of 10,000 Trailers (and lots of road salt), I’ve had both steel and aluminum trailers hauling everything from boats, to snowmobiles, quads, dirt bikes, horses and tons of trees, brush, logs,...as well as steel vs aluminum boat lifts and docks. I’ll never own another major steel device. My 14 foot utility trailer is aluminum with aluminum deck. I have some HDPE strips on the deck and ramp to protect from snowmobile carbides, but my snowmobile trailer has a wood deck (which I’ve replaced once). The OP might live where there’s no road salt and get away with a steel trailer, but no matter where he lives, it will rust, and if he has the trailer long enough, he’ll be having to sand and repaint it some day and that’s the day he’ll swear that he’ll never buy another steel trailer.

My utility trailer won’t fit my tractor with FEL. I’d replace it with a bigger trailer (aluminum), and have thought about it, but I never take the tractor anywhere. I’ve had friends ask to borrow it, or have me come over and do a job for them, but now I can just say...”love to, but I have no way to get it over there”. OTOH, if the thing has to go to the dealer (5 miles away), he’ll either come get it, or loan me a trailer, or I can borrow/rent one from the hardware store 1 mile away. But...I confess...the trailer sales place is right across the street from that hardware store, and I do stop in and shop every now and then...
 

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My input - how often will you really use a trailer while the roads are bad with salt on them? All the years I had trailers I never used one on bad roads - never had the need.

And a 14’ deck with 2’ dove tail is way too small - will never be able to balance the load to get the proper hitch weight.
 

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I’m also looking for a trailer. My tractor guys sell a number of different sizes along with option on steel, and galvanized. The one they had suggested is a galvanized 14x7 with a 5500lb axle with brakes. I’ve done sone research on the galvanizing process and it seem like it would be strong and resistant to rust as it will live outside except in the winter. Anyone with experience with the galvanized?
I have an old galvanized boat trailer that I've had for 20 years. It's held up pretty well, although it only gets about 20 miles a year, and never on snowy or salty roads. OTOH, I have a buddy with a galvanized snowmobile trailer. It's rusted some at the cut ends of various beams, welds and axle attachments. His experience doesn't make me think that galvanized would be a better choice than aluminum, although I do think it would be a better choice than painted steel.
 

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The big difference I’ve found is in the build process. Some of the manufacturers build with the galvanizing completed before assembling and cold spray the welds etc. The company I’m looking at assembles the trailer and the it’s dipped whole. I’m primarily going to used the trailer for hauling my zero turn mower to my sons house as I mow his 2 acres for him. I just want to get a trailer big enough to haul the 1025r if need be.
 

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The big difference I’ve found is in the build process. Some of the manufacturers build with the galvanizing completed before assembling and cold spray the welds etc. The company I’m looking at assembles the trailer and the it’s dipped whole. I’m primarily going to used the trailer for hauling my zero turn mower to my sons house as I mow his 2 acres for him. I just want to get a trailer big enough to haul the 1025r if need be.
That's smart. I think spending extra for a larger trailer now will cost less than buying a too-small trailer and later selling it to buy the size you wish you'd bought.

I'd bet that dipped galvanized trailer would serve you well in that application.
 

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Trailer suggestions and important issues, by category.

Length and Width Issues to consider

1.- Ideally, no less than 18' in length, certainly no narrower than 7'. Preferably 18' to 22' in length as you can haul the 1025r with the FEL and just about any rear implement offered.

2. - 8' width is OK, but really not necessary for your purposes. When you go 102" wide, the legal limit, it requires either hauling mirrors or mirror extensions to properly see the total trailer width as the trailer is wider than most tow vehicles, by quite a bit.

Trailer Material Considerations

3. - Aluminum is great material, it reduces weight which adds trailer hauling capacity. Aluminum would always be my first choice.

4. - However, aluminum or steel decks, even diamond plate are very slippery when wet and just a dew can make them treacherous to walk on. Either add traction strips, which are easy to stick on or go with a wood deck.


5. - Wood decks are nice because you can easily add tie downs where needed. Even though its a wood deck, Don't secure tie down points with self tapping hardware. Always drill through holes and use a backing plate or at a minimum, Fender Washers on the underside to secure the tie down point.

Trailer Load Securing Important Considerations

6. - EACH tie down point you add to the trailer should have a weight limit of the item being towed. In other words, add "D" rings which will EACH hold 5,000 pounds as this way, every tie down point is strong enough to hold whatever you place on the trailer. No such thing as "too strong" of an anchoring / tie down point.

7. - Certainly far too many which aren't strong enough. Avoid the "Harbor Freight" 233 pound tie downs as while you may know their limits, others might not. so just don't even include such low weight limit "D" rings on your trailer.

Trailer Design Issues and Important Use Considerations

8.-
7,000 GVWR which means at least two 3,500 pound axles, Dexter Axles are the brand standard and widely used. NO Single axle trailers for carrying such a load. A flat tire really makes the single axle trailer tough to control and will sway at highway speeds, possibly causing the entire rig to be tough to control.

9. -DO NOT buy a fold down lift gate to haul SCUTS and such heavy loads. Most lift gates are rated for 1,500 pounds or less and running the 1025r over them will bend the lift gate and eventually spring it.

10. - A tilt trailer would be ideal, otherwise, long aluminum loading ramps. Check out the difference in using and lifting steel loading ramps and aluminum loading ramps and you will quickly become a fan of the aluminum ramps.

11. - Make sure the ramps can be secured at different widths on the trailer as the typical wheel base for a car is far too wide for the 1025r to load. You should be able to slide the loading ramps where ever needed, together or far apart. Some trailers only allow ramps to be installed at widths too wide for the 1025r wheel base. Make sure to check this.

12. - Over deck trailers make the loading angle much steeper as the trailer deck is completely above the tires and wheels. That means usually a steep beaver tail which can cause many MMM to drag when loading the machines. It also makes some 3ph implements hard to load as they drag on the ground and put real stress on the top link.

13. - It also means the beaver tail isn't really useful for carrying a load due to the angle. Not a deal breaker, just something to be aware of.

14. - Make sure any side rails are strong enough and designed to be tie down points, otherwise, they are just in the way. Stake pockets are usually designated tie down points and many side rails are more decorative than practical. Know the difference.

15. - If you have to haul materials on a flat deck trailer with fenders, set a pallet at each end of the load so you can lift the lumber or material on and off the trailer with your FEL. You can also use 4"x 4" or 6"x 6" to stack materials to be able to be loaded and unloaded with the pallet forks. While the fenders can be an obstacle to loading and unloading certain loads, there are ways to accommodate the material and loads. Occasionally having to use a pallet on each end of the load to haul long lumber is not as big a hassle as losing several feet of usable trailer deck to a steep beaver tail or an over the deck trailer design.

16. - Not sure of your trailers empty tongue weight? Put the bathroom scale on a smooth level surface and crank the tongue jack post down onto the scale protecting the surface of the scale from the jack post, until it lifts the trailer off the hitch ball (making sure the ball mount isn't locked so you aren't lifting the rear of the tow vehicle when cranking the jack.:laugh:...) This can give you a general idea of the tongue weight. Most people are no better at guessing a trailers tongue weight than they are guessing a woman's weight and clothing size needs.......and NO, the two topics are not related......

17. - The trailer should use a 2 5/16th's inch hitch ball based upon the load of the trailer. As the Duke pointed out, you can use a pintle hook of other such hitch device to restrict others wanting to borrow your trailer. I simply say NO, as people tend to be indifferent to the equipment they don't own. If they want to use someone else's trailer, let them rent one or buy their own.

18. - ALWAYS put a bolt and nut or a spring clip pin through the hole on the hitch head on the trailer tongue where it sits on the ball mount. This prevents the hitch from being able to open or be lifted off the ball mount. This is a very important safety step. If nothing else, put the lock you keep in the same hole when the trailer is not in use through the hole when towing the trailer. This way no one else can remove it and it makes stealing the trailer from the tow vehicle more time consuming. :dunno:

19. - Cross the safety chains and hook them so when the chains are stretched to length, simulating the trailer coming off the ball mount, the hook tips are facing DOWN and not up. Hooks facing down can't fall off as the chains flex, where hooks facing up can fall off the hitch safety chain rings attachment point.

Why cross the chains? Because they can "catch" the trailer tongue if it becomes unhooked and it prevents the trailer tongue from making contact with the pavement and potentially causing a violent loss of trailer control. When the safety chains are not crossed, the tongue falls down between them. Consider using carbiners or threaded chain link connectors to connect the secure the chains. Just make sure the products are weight rated for the load and use.


20. -
Have a mount for the spare tire and wheel and make sure to get one. You would be surprised how many people don't and then have to search for a spare tire when they have flat. Make sure when ever you are towing the trailer, carry one of these.......otherwise you need a floor jack to change a flat trailer tire. This makes the process easy and safe.
Enjoy your new trailer and be safe........:good2:
 

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My next trailer will be an Aluma. My current trailer is one I built in 1992 from steel. The salt/rust corrosion is really starting to take its toll. Though I guess I can't complain too much considering it is 27 years old. However, when I compare it to an aluminum trailer that old, the aluminum still has quite a few years left in it whereas my steel trailer's days are numbered.

Checkout the 25th Anniversary trailer models from Aluma.
They appear to be a good starting point for the dollar and you can add options to them if you order it verses buying off the lot.

How far are you from Brainerd? Maybe I can borrow it when my steel trailer is not road worthy? :lol:
 
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I'm thinking an h&h with a wood deck or an aluma with a wood deck. I have limited storage so I'm planning on selling my utility trailer so this wood be my go to Menards trailer also.

7000lbs, electric breaks,

My biggest concern is limited ability to adjust tongue weight. Instructions say to back on trailer so tractor hood does not get ripped off by wind.

14+2 dovetail or a straight 16 or a 16 tilt/speedloader type.

What is the best for loading?
If my old steel trailer ever rusts out in my lifetime and I was still able to use one, I would replace it with a tilt deck if the primary purpose was to move equipment.

A second nod for the tilt deck as all of it is usable and if you're gonna still with 16' you are going to need every inch.

Another reason for a 18' trailer over a 16' is if you decide to sell it. 18' will likely bring more money and be gone faster.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
1025r TLB trailer

#1) Sullybear, thanks for the informative reply. It was well written, had assumed the loading ramps would be 100% adjustable across the back of the trailer deck. Have to look into that.

#2) The replys might have swayed my decision from a 16 to and 18 ft trailer. I don't foresee using it much but I'm very concerned about balancing the load I just thought a 16ft would be much easier to use for hauling snowmobiles, trips to the compost and mendards.
 
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