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Discussion Starter #1
So, I'm looking at a trailer for my baby deere. Gatormade has a 16' car hauler for $2100. My friend is trying to tell me that I need a utility trailer with sides. Big Tex has one of those, but they want $4500 for it. Do you think it would be worth paying more that twice more for for a utility?

The Gatormade has brakes on all 4 wheels, the Big Tex only has them on two.

So, what do you think?
 

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I am tempted to say the $2,100 one. Any pictures or model numbers so we can compare?
 

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Discussion Starter #3

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Personally, I prefer a utility trailer due to the rails on side. They are more flexible, and you can haul stuff with less concern of it falling out (even though it should be tied down anyway), plus you can use the rails for tie downs of smaller things. Ramps are really a personal preference. A fold-up tailgate-style ramp is much handier, unless you want to load a pallet of something in the back, in which case you need to remove the gate. A car hauler will allow loading of pallets from the side. You can roll a dolly up the tailgate ramp.

In the end, it all comes down to personal preference. Either one will work for the purpose of hauling your tractor. A word of advice, though, in going with a 7k lb rated trailer, do not get a 2" coupler. Spring for the 2-5/16" as it will be stronger and give you that extra safety factor if you ever haul something much larger.

However, the price for that Big Tex is outrageous! I can get a similar one here that is made by Doolittle (similar in quality) for $1900.
 

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I would prefer the utility trailer also. I also agree with fordmantpw, price seems high.
Do you need a 7,000lb trailer for something else?
I would not recommend a one piece fold up ramp. Individual fold up ramps I would.
 

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Big Tex is a great brand trailer, but I'll buck the trend and say get the car hauler. You can load things from the side, and don't have to worry about bending the side rails if you have something extra wide you need to move. The car hauler style are easier to chain down on as well, in my opinion. The rail trailers are usually set up for you to strap to the rails, and for a lot of things the rails are higher than your tie down point on the equipment, so you end up trying to strap to the bottom of the trailer frame below the rail. That's usually angle iron, and the wood decking sits in the angle so you can't get a hook on it. Car hauler type trailers usually have the lower rail of the frame facing down, so you can hook onto it. They also have stake pockets you can attach some things to.

If you buy the car hauler, you can build wooden or metal sides that will sit in the stake pockets and be removable when you don't want them. The utility trailer rail is designed to be structural, and can't be removed. I would go for the car hauler, and if you were looking at a bigger trailer I'd recommend a deck over. The fewer things in the way along the side, the better. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
So, one of the things that I like about the Gator Made trailer is that you can put the ramps on the side to pull up a 4 wheeler. Then I could put the tractor behind that. I need to tow gear 2 hours to the hunting lease. I just upgraded from a Ford Ranger to a F150, so I'm looking at a 7k trailer because it is just under my towing capacity and I don't want to upgrade later. Better to get it now.

I did find this trailer:
6.4' X 16.0' TRAILER WITH GATE/RAMP **EXPANDED METAL SIDES** in Trailers | eBay Motors

I called and asked about not having brakes on all 4 wheels, he told me that it wasn't an issue. I've got to dig into the DOT website to see.
 

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I would say car hauler because you can make side out of wood to slide into the stake pockets and remove them when not needed.

I am picking up a new suretrac tilt trailer tomorrow morning.

Sent via TapaTalk from a hunting blind near you. :)
 

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I recommend a 18 or 20' car/equipent trailer for a few reasons. # 1 room for attachments. #2 Could haul a car or truck. #3 A 20' trailer doesnt cost much more than a 16' trailer. A 20' trailer pulls about the same as a 16' trailer.

I went with a 20' 10k car/equipent trailer. A bit over kill for a 1026r. But, I can get the 1026 with snowblower and 2 atvs on it.:thumbup1gif:
IMAG0155.JPG
 

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Great thread and guidance guys!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the replies everyone. Regarding brakes, I found this on the GDOT web site:

Q: Does my trailer have to have brakes?
A: Yes, if the gross weight of the trailer (weight of trailer and load) is over 3,000 lbs.

Q: What brakes are required?
A: Operative service brakes on all wheels, a parking brake system, an emergency brake system, and a breakaway braking system. The parking and emergency systems can be combined.

I'm still looking around, it seems that the south is a prime spot to build trailers, so I've got several places to look still.
 

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I bought my 16ft car hauler with 7k axles and brakes for $1500 cash new......it has the 2ft rear dove tail and slide in ramps.....sorry about the pic quality...its raining today and I ran out to take some quick pics.......
 

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I bought my 16ft car hauler with 7k axles and brakes for $1500 cash new......it has the 2ft rear dove tail and slide in ramps.....sorry about the pic quality...its raining today and I ran out to take some quick pics.......
I think you stole it for that price.
 

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I haul other items like river rock, road rock, split wood, tree limbs, lumber, and of course the 2305 with FEL and box blade. The utility trailer with sides have work well. I think you have to figure out what would work best for you.

Doug
 

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Go the flatbed style. Just make some sides like others have said.. Also, GET BRAKES ON AT LEAST ONE AXLE!!! You have no idea how a trailer and tractor will push ya when trying to slow down..

Also for everyone else, if you get brakes on just one axle of a tandem, get them on the rear. They wont slide as easy.. My first tandem was on the fronts, slide them all the time, then the second tandem they were on the rear only. Big difference IMO. Now I wont buy a tandem with out both axles braked.
 

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Go the flatbed style. Just make some sides like others have said.. Also, GET BRAKES ON AT LEAST ONE AXLE!!! You have no idea how a trailer and tractor will push ya when trying to slow down..

Also for everyone else, if you get brakes on just one axle of a tandem, get them on the rear. They wont slide as easy.. My first tandem was on the fronts, slide them all the time, then the second tandem they were on the rear only. Big difference IMO. Now I wont buy a tandem with out both axles braked.
I thought one axle brakes had to be the rear axle, a law or something?
 

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The law in Iowa requires you to have brakes on all wheels with trailers more than 3,000 pound.

Doug
 

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Best to get brakes on both axles. And get a decent controller. Prodigy makes some good models.
 

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I agree its best to have brakes on all axels. But, my boat trailer only has brakes on the front axel and I can stop it just fine with my 3/4 ton truck. I have never seen a trailer with brakes on ony the rear axel.
 

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Although my state (AK) doesn't require brakes on all axles, Canada and Washington do (as well as many others).
I'm using a converted cargo hauler for my 1026r.
 
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