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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
HELP, Please!:dunno:

I have a 2015 Chevrolet 2500HD Truck and need to move my JD 5220 with Loader and Farmi Winch to another property I own. I have asked and asked around from dealer to loggers' to other tractor owners and I get that many different answers. It's so damn frustrating. The Tractor I would say is 10K lbs with implements? 12K max?

I just looked at a $1500 used Deck over Trailer with new brakes, lights etc. "24000 pound Trailer" on the placard with what on the tongue he didn't know. I have a logger friend who said he thought it would be quite a load on my Truck and there are two big hills to go up and down.

Can anyone Please help me so I don't get into a dangerous situation nor ripped off in a sale? New is not an option.


And Yes I am obviously still a "NEWBIE", so much so that when my wife asked what I'd like for Fathers Day I said "for my friend Robbie to come over, as a teacher, to do a full on service of all fluids hydraulics etc., ALL REGULAR MAINTAINENCE, with me. :laugh::mocking:

As always thank you for your generous help with the Trailer Question.

WILD-MTN
 

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I think your estimate of the actual tractor weight may be wrong. TractorData.com shows a max weight of 6031 lbs if you have a 4WD with cab, significantly lower for other configs. Even if that doesn't include fluids or filled tires I doubt whether you're anywhere near 10,000#. You'll still have to take into account the weight of your trailer, tow style (bumper-pull or gooseneck) and whether tongue weight can be adjusted to safe standards, but I doubt that it would exceed the capacity of a 2500HD. I believe my dad pulls a 13-14K 5th wheel camper with his similar truck all over the country.

Rob
 

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You’ll get lots of help here.

Just wanted to say thank you for asking before you got yourself into a bad situation. I made my living on the road for many years and cringe to think back on all the bad trailer setups I saw going down the road. People have to remember that they share the road with many other people - the need for a safe setup is paramount.
 

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I agree that sounds a little heavy, but IDK how much the loader weighs. Still doubt 10k lbs,

I would look for a trailer: 7 foot wide, 18 -20 foot long, with two 7K lbs axles, brakes on at least one axle, stand up ramps, or the fold down ramps, or a tilt. A heavy jack stand on the front.

If you are hauling with a implement the stand up ramps could be an issue or you might could back the tractor on.
The ramps with the kick stand helps keep you're truck from being picked up and from rolling.
The 7k ramp trailers are around $2500 to $3800
All that goes away with a tilt. We have one at work and it's super. But they are $4500 to $5500.





IF the steep hills are loose gravel that could be an issue.
NEVER UNLOAD ON A HILL WITH OUT SOMEBODY HOLDING THE BRAKE OR WHEELS CHOCKED GOOD.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Got it.

I think your estimate of the actual tractor weight may be wrong. TractorData.com shows a max weight of 6031 lbs if you have a 4WD with cab, significantly lower for other configs. Even if that doesn't include fluids or filled tires I doubt whether you're anywhere near 10,000#. You'll still have to take into account the weight of your trailer, tow style (bumper-pull or gooseneck) and whether tongue weight can be adjusted to safe standards, but I doubt that it would exceed the capacity of a 2500HD. I believe my dad pulls a 13-14K 5th wheel camper with his similar truck all over the country.

Rob
Rob that is good information. I am 4WD but no Cab. I'll call it 6500lbs and go from there. :bigthumb: So....Any recommendations on Trailer size, weight rating etc.? Even a comment like "I'd go with this one" and attach a Picture. I'm a visual learner don't-cha-know. :munch:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
"Rodney"

You’ll get lots of help here.

Just wanted to say thank you for asking before you got yourself into a bad situation. I made my living on the road for many years and cringe to think back on all the bad trailer setups I saw going down the road. People have to remember that they share the road with many other people - the need for a safe setup is paramount.

If you ever saw the movie CADYSHACK, when Rodney Dangerfield is running a HUGE motorboat through the harbor? I had an instructor in College (Maritime College) that refered to the Dumb side of the General Public boating community as Rodney. Watch out for Rodney! Rodney WILL, cross in front of you. Well, I never want to be in the "RODNEY" class of Trailer Haulers on the Highway's of this great nation. I've seen plenty and Oh my God what in the world are they thinking?:nunu:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That's a big difference.

I agree that sounds a little heavy, but IDK how much the loader weighs. Still doubt 10k lbs,

I would look for a trailer: 7 foot wide, 18 -20 foot long, with two 7K lbs axles, brakes on at least one axle, stand up ramps, or the fold down ramps, or a tilt. A heavy jack stand on the front.

If you are hauling with a implement the stand up ramps could be an issue or you might could back the tractor on.
The ramps with the kick stand helps keep you're truck from being picked up and from rolling.
The 7k ramp trailers are around $2500 to $3800
All that goes away with a tilt. We have one at work and it's super. But they are $4500 to $5500.


IF the steep hills are loose gravel that could be an issue.
NEVER UNLOAD ON A HILL WITH OUT SOMEBODY HOLDING THE BRAKE OR WHEELS CHOCKED GOOD.
Nn Gravel. Thank you. That guy was trying to sell me a Trailer more than twice the capacity I needed. Can't trust anyone.
 

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Rob that is good information. I am 4WD but no Cab. I'll call it 6500lbs and go from there. :bigthumb: So....Any recommendations on Trailer size, weight rating etc.? Even a comment like "I'd go with this one" and attach a Picture. I'm a visual learner don't-cha-know. :munch:
Well, I'd get a better estimate of the total weight of what you are going to haul before making a specific recommendation, but in general I'd say a 10K or 14K utility/equipment trailer would be what you're looking for. I'm a fan of my 10K 18' (16+2) ABU Trailer equipment trailer because it does what I need and is somewhat flexible. I made short (15") sides for it so that I can haul loose material if I need and it easily handles my other equipment. It has stored ramps which have their pros and cons. Pros are that they are not in the way if you need to haul something long and they aren't bouncing around, but cons are that they are heavy and take time to un-stow and put in place and then re-stow plus they don't provide vertical support so there are separate drop leg supports to put down when unloading something heavy. And those things have WAY too few adjustment holes in them...

Lots of people love gooseneck trailers for these heavy haulers so you may want to consider that if you will only ever be using a truck that is equipped for it.



Rob
 

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I agree that sounds a little heavy, but IDK how much the loader weighs. Still doubt 10k lbs,

I would look for a trailer: 7 foot wide, 18 -20 foot long, with two 7K lbs axles, brakes on at least one axle, stand up ramps, or the fold down ramps, or a tilt. A heavy jack stand on the front.

If you are hauling with a implement the stand up ramps could be an issue or you might could back the tractor on.
The ramps with the kick stand helps keep you're truck from being picked up and from rolling.
The 7k ramp trailers are around $2500 to $3800
All that goes away with a tilt. We have one at work and it's super. But they are $4500 to $5500.





IF the steep hills are loose gravel that could be an issue.
NEVER UNLOAD ON A HILL WITH OUT SOMEBODY HOLDING THE BRAKE OR WHEELS CHOCKED GOOD.
The only thing I would change is get brakes on BOTH axles. Some states require this if over a certain weight.

Is there somewhere close you can weigh your tractor??
 

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The only thing I would change is get brakes on BOTH axles. Some states require this if over a certain weight.

Is there somewhere close you can weigh your tractor??
He really shouldn't have to go to the trouble of bringing it to be weighed. Everything has a spec that can be looked up... he just needs to gather them up. Tractor weight, weight of attachments (loader, mower, etc.), weight of liquid in tires if filled, weight of ballast if any. Then add a bit of safety buffer and you got your cargo weight.

Rob
 

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Rob that is good information. I am 4WD but no Cab. I'll call it 6500lbs and go from there. :bigthumb: So....Any recommendations on Trailer size, weight rating etc.? Even a comment like "I'd go with this one" and attach a Picture. I'm a visual learner don't-cha-know. :munch:
1. Goose neck trailers haul MUCH BETTER than bumper pull trailers.....

2. Fifth wheel trailers are rare in open utility and cargo trailers. The fifth wheel is also an expensive hitch where the goose neck is not.

3. If you do get a 5th wheel trailer, MAKE SURE TO GET A PIVOTING HITCH. This way, if you unhook where the trailer isn't level with the truck, you can get it hooked back up again. Without the 5th wheel hitch having the ability to pivot side to side, you canreally struggle to hook and unhook when the surface isn't parking lot level.

4. Personally, I would go with a 8 foot wide trailer or even 102" wide, which is the legal limit. Why, because then you can also haul a car and it will be nearly the same width as your truck.

5. I prefer stake pockets on the trailer over "rails". Here is a picture of each.



The stake pockets are on the side between the red and silver safety tape. These are designed secure places to tie down. Also, note this is a solid deck trailer, which is also good.







This trailer is the type you want to AVOID, here is why.
The rails are often weak tie down points and not designed to be used for securing the load of a tractor.

The tail gate would be CRUSHED by the weight of your tractor. The ramp weight limit on these types is barely enough for a garden tractor.

THIS TRAILER IS FAR TO LIGHT FOR YOUR USE. look at the front where the tongue mounts in this one and then look at the one above. HUGE difference in steel size, strength and design.
 

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5. I prefer stake pockets on the trailer over "rails". Here is a picture of each.

Good point. That's why I chose the trailer I did. I wanted to have a bed that I could load a pallet onto or scoop dirt off of so permanent rails were out for me. I prefer stake pockets with some type of removable rails. Mine are built out of wood but I'm sure they make metal rails that drop in too.



Rob
 

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More visuals to help you....

A fifth wheel hitch looks like this;

hitch 1.png


Where a Gooseneck hitch looks like this;


Gooseneck hitches are MUCH lighter to lift in and out of the truck. In fact many trucks come with the Gooseneck hitch ready to go just add the ball where the 5th wheel has to be installed and it's a big deal.

A good gooseneck hitch is probably $400 To $500. A good 5th wheel articulating / pivoting hitch can be anywhere from $800 to $1,800 depending upon brand, weight limit, mount style etc.

Make sure to get the heaviest weight limit hitch possible. There is no risk in having too "much" hitch. There is a BIG risk ion having a hitch not up to the weight limit.
 

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Watch Craiglist, etc. for used trailers. There are some Gooseneck trailers out there which are like this...

This trailer new is around $4,000

Now understand this is a bare bones, low end trailer, but it would work.

Also, you can often rent a trailer for short term use which will give you a feel for different types.


https://sleequipment.com/utility-trailer-8-5-x-18-car-hauler.html?fee=23&fep=1720047&gclid=CjwKCAjw6djYBRB8EiwAoAF6oYY0nwfi0TCabNxG-3CkQpV14Dk1EaVOWTVhom4x_tLMzS3rF63lUBoCw0gQAvD_BwE
 

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a '15 silverado 2500hd can EASILY pull 10k. My dad has a 2012 which sometimes pulls upwards of 9000 or so, with no issues whatsoever. He has a class 5 hitch so all good there. One thing to note is that GM constantly under-rates their trucks for some odd reason.
 

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You will hear the term Beaver Tail thrown around when talking about trailers. A beaver tail can be a very helpful thing.

It is the angle downward on the rear portion of the trailer. It makes loading items with possible low center clearance like a tractor with a MMM easier as it eliminates the sharp transition point from the loading ramp to the trailer deck.





Here is a trailer without a Beaver Tail....see the difference?

 

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a '15 silverado 2500hd can EASILY pull 10k. My dad has a 2012 which sometimes pulls upwards of 9000 or so, with no issues whatsoever. He has a class 5 hitch so all good there. One thing to note is that GM constantly under-rates their trucks for some odd reason.
My dad had a Silverado with the Duramax Diesel and his 5th wheel weighed nearly 14,000 lbs and his truck hauled it NO Problemo.....

Just to be clear to the original poster, a Gooseneck or 5th wheel hitch has a MUCH HIGHER towing limit than the same truck with a bumper pull trailer........

Bumper pull / TAG trailers look like this one....They hook to a hitch mounted under the truck rear bumper



Gooseneck and 5th Wheel trailers look like this and pull from the hitch mounted in the center of the trucks bed.

 

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Weight

Important terms when you are shopping for trailer you need to know.

GVWR - Gross Vehicle WEIGHT RATING - Limit of the trailer and it's payload.

GAWR - Gross Axle Weight Rating - The limit of weight per axle

Landscape Trailer - Usually an open trailer with side rails for hauling lawn mowers. Often has a lift gate which you don't want. usually has 3,500 lb axles. Not heavy enough for your needs.

Equipment Trailer - Usually an open trailer with a BEAVER TAIL, loading ramps instead of a liftgate and usually is built with 5,200lb axles or 7,000lb axles. This is what you are seeking.

Beavertail - The angled portion of the trailer deck which makes loading and unloading easier. See photo examples above.

Flat Deck Trailer - A flat, open trailer without a Beaver Tail. Often uses a lift gate. See photos examples above.

Liftgate - The mesh style rear loading ramp shown on the examples posted above. Your tractor would CRUSH a Lift gate trailer and this is not what you need or want. Lift gates are for people loading lawnmowers and other equipment which weihs less than 2,000lb.

Loading Ramps - Individual steel ramps which are attached to the rear of a trailer to load and unload vehicles and heavier items. Loading ramps can be solid, or have cross bars or other designs As long as they meet the weight limit, the style isn't as important as long as the tires would fit on the ramps.

Steel Deck verse Wood Deck - The surface of the actual trailer deck material. Both have advantages and disadvantages. As long as the surface is strong and not compromised by rust or rot, its up to the individual purchasing the trailer. I have owned both steel deck and wood deck trailers and they are fine as long as the weight limit applies, etc.

Trailer Brand - The actual manufacturer of the trailer. Some brands are better quality than others. Some home built trailers are outstanding quality and ideal and other home built trailers are down right scary. Just know that the licensing and insurance actions for a trailer which was home built may be much more difficult and require inspections and extra steps verses a trailer built by a recognized and licensed manufacturing company. Any manufacturing company produced trailer should have the labels on the front of the trailer, often on the drivers side of the trailer tongue, listing the applicable weight limits, axle ratings, etc. as well as the serial number of the trailer.

Tag / Bumper Pull - A trailer which mounts to the hitch when mounted below the rear bumper of the tow vehicle. These trailers are very common. They also have the lowest weigt limits because of their design.

Tongue Weight or Tongue Weight Limit - VERY IMPORTANT. The maximum amount of weight which can safely be carried on the tongue of the trailer. It is determined by placing a scale under the tongue jacking point of a loaded or unloaded trailer. Generally, to have a well balanced load,. the to ngue weight should not exceed 10% to 15% of the trailers total weight. So, if a trailer weighs 7,000lbs loaded, the tongue weight should not exceed 700 to 1,050 lbs.

Hitch weight limits also apply. NEVER exceed these rated limits or ir can make the trailer tow very unpredictably and dangerously.

Anti Sway Bars and or Load Leveling Hitch - These used to be independent of one another but are now commonly combined into the same product. This is a hitch style which helps to spread the tongue weight back to the rest of the trailer and it helps to keep the towing of the trailer safe. Always consult a hitch professional as to the very best hitch for your specific application. One size does NOT fit all, and it's important to match the hitch to the load and trailer.

Ball Mount - The 2" square receiver assembly where the hitch ball mounts. It is held into the rear bumper hitch with a hitch pin. Ball mounts can have drops to keep the ability to tow the trailer level with the tow vehicle. This is a typical standard ball mount shown with the ball installed and the hitch pin and retainer key.


Drop Ball Mount - Designed to allow a taller tow vehicle to hitch to a lower trailer. Often used with large pick ups or when the tow vehicle might have a lift kit installed, etc. These come in drop increments from 3" to as much as 15" of drop.
The one pictured has a 8" drop. You determine the drop needed by backing the truck to the trailer when both are level ans measure how much higher the tow vehicle hitch is than the trailer.

ball mount drop.png
 

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HELP, Please!:dunno:

I have a 2015 Chevrolet 2500HD Truck and need to move my JD 5220 with Loader and Farmi Winch to another property I own. I have asked and asked around from dealer to loggers' to other tractor owners and I get that many different answers. It's so damn frustrating. The Tractor I would say is 10K lbs with implements? 12K max?

I just looked at a $1500 used Deck over Trailer with new brakes, lights etc. "24000 pound Trailer" on the placard with what on the tongue he didn't know. I have a logger friend who said he thought it would be quite a load on my Truck and there are two big hills to go up and down.

Can anyone Please help me so I don't get into a dangerous situation nor ripped off in a sale? New is not an option.


And Yes I am obviously still a "NEWBIE", so much so that when my wife asked what I'd like for Fathers Day I said "for my friend Robbie to come over, as a teacher, to do a full on service of all fluids hydraulics etc., ALL REGULAR MAINTAINENCE, with me. :laugh::mocking:

As always thank you for your generous help with the Trailer Question.

WILD-MTN
Well, I am not Robbie and I can't come over, but I would be glad to provide any insight and knowledge I can to help you. :laugh:

Don't automatically discount a new trailer as sometimes, the low interest rates offered make the new trailers a better use of capital than tying up cash in a used trailer. Also, sometimes there just aren't any used trailer which are worth the money being asked for them. I looked at Maine Craigslist and there were very few utility trailers for sale.

Just FYI, I used to own a trailer and hitch dealership so I have extensive experience in this area. I can tell you if a trailer is a good deal or not. I don't mind helping and would be glad to do what I can to help anyone learn and to make sure they aren't taken advantage of.

Any trailer you are considering should have a 2 5/16th's size hitch ball. Anything smaller than that is an indication the trailer isn't heavy enough for your needs and don't waste time considering it.

Please let us know what questions you may have after reviewing the posts on this tread. A lot of information is touched upon and specific answers are most helpful to specific questions you might have. Feel free to pose any questions you might have. Also feel free to use the private messenger if you feel necessary.

I tried to locate trailers for sale in your area but i am not sure where you are in the state and I don't have the familiarity with Maine to be helpful in that regard.

We do have an excellent GTT member Rydrplrs who is very knowledgeable and helpful, so don't hesitate to contact him about trailers in your area or his experience with various dealers, etc.

Hope all of this information is helpful to you. I will wait for your specific questions before posting more information.
 

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HELP, Please!:dunno:

I have a 2015 Chevrolet 2500HD Truck and need to move my JD 5220 with Loader and Farmi Winch to another property I own. I have asked and asked around from dealer to loggers' to other tractor owners and I get that many different answers. It's so damn frustrating. The Tractor I would say is 10K lbs with implements? 12K max?

I just looked at a $1500 used Deck over Trailer with new brakes, lights etc. "24000 pound Trailer" on the placard with what on the tongue he didn't know. I have a logger friend who said he thought it would be quite a load on my Truck and there are two big hills to go up and down.

Can anyone Please help me so I don't get into a dangerous situation nor ripped off in a sale? New is not an option.


And Yes I am obviously still a "NEWBIE", so much so that when my wife asked what I'd like for Fathers Day I said "for my friend Robbie to come over, as a teacher, to do a full on service of all fluids hydraulics etc., ALL REGULAR MAINTAINENCE, with me. :laugh::mocking:

As always thank you for your generous help with the Trailer Question.

WILD-MTN
I would be surprised if you did not already have a 2 inch hitch receiver on the rear of your pickup which has plenty of power to pull this. That means you already have the capability of pulling a so called "bumper pull" or "straight" trailer. However, nobody has mentioned the need for brakes beyond the need for brakes on both axles. Do you have a brake controller on the dash? You absolutely will need a brake controller to make the brakes work on whatever trailer you use or buy. Many people I have talked to think that the brakes on trailer will just work by plugging the trailer electrical plug into the tow vehicle. NOT SO!!!! You must have a brake controller on the tow vehicle. You tow vehicle does not have enough stopping capacity to stop safely without the trailer having working brakes. The trailer can even swap ends with the tow vehicle in an emergency stop. You may never get a second chance for that to happen as you may be six feet under.

As for the trailer, a gooseneck trailer is so much easier to tow than a bumper pull trailer. You just never have to worry about it tracking properly behind you. I don't know how often you will need to transport the tractor, so it may not be economically feasible to have a gooseneck hitch installed which will like run you $500-600. B&W is the best. You need to figure out what the gross trailer weight will be with the tractor loaded and keep in mind that sooner or later, you will want to also load an attachment or two at the same time. So if your tractor weighs 6500# at a minimum, what is the empty weight of the trailer? A 20ft (min length in my opinion) trailer with 3500# axles will weigh around 3000#. However they have a max gross weight of 7000# and you are at 9500# gross already. If you go to a 10,000# gross weight trailer, it will probably weigh 4000#, so now you are at 10,500# gross, still over the limit. Now you are up to looking at a 14,000# gross weight trailer, which will weigh more again, probably around 5000#. But with your 6500# tractor, you are looking at 11,500#, finally enough capacity and a little reserve.

Now the problem, 11,500# behind a 7000# tow vehicle can be a chore to handle safely. It is done all the time, but I felt like I did not want to take those kind of chances, so I went with a 31ft gooseneck tandem dually deckover (flatbed) to haul my 4066R. That required me to have a gooseneck hitch installed and I have never been sorry I went that route as I can run down the highway completely at ease. I kept upgrading trailer sizes and finally decided that this was going to be the last trailer for me. You know the old saying: go big or go home.

Gooseneck trailers with 2 single axles(single tires) rated at 14,000# gross are available, which would be the minimum you would need. You might not need to go as heavy as I did. My gooseneck trailer weighs 7300# empty, therefore I gross 14,000# with the tow vehicle, even before loading the tractor, but that does not seem to be a problem as I can pull it in 6th gear with a F250 6.2L gasser, dropping to 5th on a decent grade and 4th on hills. Since 5th and 6th gears are overdrive, I am happy with that. Your diesel should pull even better than my gasser.

Sorry to be so long winded, but I hope I have spelled this out in a way that helps you.

Dave
 
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