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What size trailer would be needed to legally haul, in Michigan, produce bulk crates or a JD 5200 with an attachment? I have a 1 ton truck. Not familiar with loading laws.
 

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Machine weighs under 5000 pounds per specs. If you double it you're trailer needs are still under 10,000. Providing your total truck and trailer combo does not get registered for anything over 26,000 you are good to go if under your personal name. I recall a business has a different criteria under commercial regs.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Machine weighs under 5000 pounds per specs. If you double it you're trailer needs are still under 10,000. Providing your total truck and trailer combo does not get registered for anything over 26,000 you are good to go if under your personal name. I recall a business has a different criteria under commercial regs.
Truck is a farm truck. Used to move equipment to repair shop or favors for friends. It takes product to local markets and if I recall my farm plate sheet specifies that's fine. Truck has an 8x12 wood flatbed but may be changed in the next year to 10' steel. I believe that's under 10,000#
 

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No, No you never do favors for friends. If you do it requires a DOT # and different insurance. You only haul your stuff and are not for hire or loan. It's just a farm vehicle for hauling your farm stuff. If it's not licensed, like tractors etc. it's yours if anyone cares to know.

You can look up the towing capacity of your truck online. Just Google towing capacity of year, make and model. Pay attention to trailer brakes or no brakes.
 

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Personally, I would call your local state police post, DOT, or vehicle enforcement office. Whatever anyone says here doesn't matter in a court of law. :good2:
This is the only post in this thread that should be heeded. Anything else should be considered inaccurate, incomplete, or flat-out wrong.

Check with State Police, the DMV/RMV, your local (insert truck brand here) dealer (for tow capacity info), AND anyone else that could have a hand in ticketing / fining you for doing it wrong. You might even want to lob a call to your insurance company to ask about the qualifications for commercial insurance as that will help you understand the lines that are drawn between consumer and commercial use, too.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Plates here for commercial vehicles are between $1200 & $2000. That's insane. Then you need a special license on top of that. That's why I try and stay inside the rules of farm plates.
 

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Finally found what I was looking for, my truck is well within legal limits as would a trailer.
Glad you got it figured out. It's not rocket science.

I forgot to add just look in the door jamb (I think that's where it was on my F350) for the GVWR and GCWR. It's attached to the truck someplace.
 

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I always hear that tow ratings are on the rating sticker on the door jamb or where ever, or in the operators manual. Well, on my '96 F-250 it is not in either of those two locations! I've flipped thru the ops manual page by page, checked the index, even looked thru the Helms service manuals, and the separate PSD owners manual on care & feeding of the 7.3L, NOTHING! Where I did find it was in the sales brochure I got from my dealer when I started shopping for the truck winter of '93/'94! Ordered the truck March of '96, took delivery 6-27-1996. Tow ratings may be on the rating sticker on new trucks, or in the owners manuals, but don't assume that applies to all trucks! There were no tow ratings on my '78 & '87 F-150's either!

It's odd, my 3.55 axle ratio drops gross tow capacity 2000# from the 4.10's. The 5-speed manual drops tow rating 2000# from the E4OD also. A 4.10 auto trans truck is rated 20,000# gross, my truck 16,000#. But the frame, axles, brakes, springs, tires, wheels, bearings, and anything else that effects load carrying capacity is all the same.

Heaviest I've towed was about 200 miles at a bit over 18,000# gross. I could run 50, 60, 70, maybe even 80 with my pure stock un-chipped truck. If I hit a big hill I could drop to 4th and still run 65 mph. If I towed heavy a lot, I'd want 4.10's, or even 3.73's that were not available in '96, but even with only 210-215 HP towing with 3.55's and 31-32" tall tires is fine.
 

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You haul anything for anyone else across a state line you are in DOT land and need a number and insurance
if the combination of truck and trailer has the CAPACITY to haul 10,001 lbs you are in DOT land and need a number and insurance

https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/registration/do-i-need-usdot-number-1
The requirement for a CDL, physical exam card and USDOT number has to do with "transporting property or passengers in commerce". This means what you are doing is for sale or you are getting paid to do it.

If you are driving a vehicle, no matter what size, for your own use, you do not fall under Federal DOT rules. Concerning your own State rules, as others have said, check with your State.

[h=1]Do I Need a USDOT Number?[/h][h=3]Are you a Motor Carrier, transporting property or passengers in commerce?[/h]
 

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What size trailer would be needed to legally haul, in Michigan, produce bulk crates or a JD 5200 with an attachment? I have a 1 ton truck. Not familiar with loading laws.
Every state has a different set of rules for towing and everyone will their own opinion on how much weight you can tow legally (and safely). Generally you do not need a CDL if your total weight is under 26k (check your state regs though). However, you need to see what your truck is rated for. If you have a newer 1 ton it will tow much more than what the manufacturer rates it at but it's the stopping part that will get you. So you have two factors to consider, what your truck will actually tow and what the law says you can without requiring a CDL (assuming you want to avoid a CDL). The DMV will also have rules about the length of your trailer as well. I would get familiar with them and make sure you completely understand before you make a purchase. I would read the DMV regulations yourself because everyone tends to have a different idea on what is considered legal. What is legal for me with a Virginia licensed truck may be completely different than in the great state of Michigan.

Once you wade through that then you need to figure out what size trailer you need for your tractor. Sounds like you have a decent size tractor so get a trailer with brakes on both axles. I always recommend a tandem axle trailer if you can afford it and for something as big as yours, you will need it. A tandem axle carries the weight better and if you have a blowout, you still have 3 more tires to carry the load. One of my trailers is a single axle and I am always concerned when I tow my little SCUT on it.

One rule of thumb I try to follow is to get as big of a trailer as you can afford because you will find a use for it. Better too have too much capacity than not enough.

Good luck with your search. If you happen to have any winter RV or tractor shows that is usually a good place to find a sale on a trailer. Sometimes those vendors don't want to take that trailer back home so they will cut a deal. :greentractorride:
 

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I always hear that tow ratings are on the rating sticker on the door jamb or where ever, or in the operators manual. Well, on my '96 F-250 it is not in either of those two locations! I've flipped thru the ops manual page by page, checked the index, even looked thru the Helms service manuals, and the separate PSD owners manual on care & feeding of the 7.3L, NOTHING! Where I did find it was in the sales brochure I got from my dealer when I started shopping for the truck winter of '93/'94! Ordered the truck March of '96, took delivery 6-27-1996. Tow ratings may be on the rating sticker on new trucks, or in the owners manuals, but don't assume that applies to all trucks! There were no tow ratings on my '78 & '87 F-150's either!

It's odd, my 3.55 axle ratio drops gross tow capacity 2000# from the 4.10's. The 5-speed manual drops tow rating 2000# from the E4OD also. A 4.10 auto trans truck is rated 20,000# gross, my truck 16,000#. But the frame, axles, brakes, springs, tires, wheels, bearings, and anything else that effects load carrying capacity is all the same.

Heaviest I've towed was about 200 miles at a bit over 18,000# gross. I could run 50, 60, 70, maybe even 80 with my pure stock un-chipped truck. If I hit a big hill I could drop to 4th and still run 65 mph. If I towed heavy a lot, I'd want 4.10's, or even 3.73's that were not available in '96, but even with only 210-215 HP towing with 3.55's and 31-32" tall tires is fine.
manufacturers develop tow ratings based on the suspension and the powertrain. It stands to reason a truck geared with a 3.55 will tow less than one with a 4.10 gear. Back then there wasn't a national standard on tow ratings. They just came out with one either last year or the year before. That's why over the years you see a wide variety of towing capacities from the Big 3. I think it was whatever the marketing folks thought they could get away with or the engineers used a very narrow set of towing conditions to achieve their numbers!
 

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Hmmm, maybe better check on that one

The requirement for a CDL, physical exam card and USDOT number has to do with "transporting property or passengers in commerce". This means what you are doing is for sale or you are getting paid to do it.

If you are driving a vehicle, no matter what size, for your own use, you do not fall under Federal DOT rules. Concerning your own State rules, as others have said, check with your State.

[h=1]Do I Need a USDOT Number?[/h][h=3]Are you a Motor Carrier, transporting property or passengers in commerce?[/h]
My understand is that if you are transporting goods for sale, no matter whether they are yours or someone else's you may be "in commerce". If you run interstate (between states) or on the federal highway system roads I would definitely make sure you are in compliance. It's just not worth the hassle of a ticket and possibly having a truck loaded with perishable goods on the side of a highway while it's being sorted out.

Treefarmer
 

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My understand is that if you are transporting goods for sale, no matter whether they are yours or someone else's you may be "in commerce". If you run interstate (between states) or on the federal highway system roads I would definitely make sure you are in compliance. It's just not worth the hassle of a ticket and possibly having a truck loaded with perishable goods on the side of a highway while it's being sorted out.

Treefarmer
There are specific exceptions for agricultural trucks, but you have to have the truck and trailer registered as such and may need an agriculture endorsement on your driver's license. It varies by state with regard to how they handle farm trucks.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
What size trailer would be needed to legally haul, in Michigan, produce bulk crates or a JD 5200 with an attachment? I have a 1 ton truck. Not familiar with loading laws.
Every state has a different set of rules for towing and everyone will their own opinion on how much weight you can tow legally (and safely). Generally you do not need a CDL if your total weight is under 26k (check your state regs though). However, you need to see what your truck is rated for. If you have a newer 1 ton it will tow much more than what the manufacturer rates it at but it's the stopping part that will get you. So you have two factors to consider, what your truck will actually tow and what the law says you can without requiring a CDL (assuming you want to avoid a CDL). The DMV will also have rules about the length of your trailer as well. I would get familiar with them and make sure you completely understand before you make a purchase. I would read the DMV regulations yourself because everyone tends to have a different idea on what is considered legal. What is legal for me with a Virginia licensed truck may be completely different than in the great state of Michigan.

Once you wade through that then you need to figure out what size trailer you need for your tractor. Sounds like you have a decent size tractor so get a trailer with brakes on both axles. I always recommend a tandem axle trailer if you can afford it and for something as big as yours, you will need it. A tandem axle carries the weight better and if you have a blowout, you still have 3 more tires to carry the load. One of my trailers is a single axle and I am always concerned when I tow my little SCUT on it.

One rule of thumb I try to follow is to get as big of a trailer as you can afford because you will find a use for it. Better too have too much capacity than not enough.

Good luck with your search. If you happen to have any winter RV or tractor shows that is usually a good place to find a sale on a trailer. Sometimes those vendors don't want to take that trailer back home so they will cut a deal.
Tandem is the only way to go in my opinion. Easier for me to back up too. I agree with you on the size thing.
 
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