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Discussion Starter #1
I found one of my trailer's wooden planks is rotten just below what looks to be a good board. If I'm to replace one board, I'll replace them all. My question is what kind of lumber should I use? Any pretreating of the wood prior to installation? This trailer sits out in the weather and sun with no protection. I was using used oil on the boards for protection, but it seems like that's not currently going to do anything for these boards. I didn't do this for the first 4-5 years I owned it. I'm not sure what kind of wood was used by the factory, I'm not a wood expert by any means.:lol:

My trailer is 20' Load Trail with full length boards.

Any suggestions that won't cost me thousands of dollars?
 

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Jason,
I just replaced the floor on my trailer. I used 2 x 10 treated lumber and then I painted them. I often thought how well a composite decking boards would do?
 
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Discussion Starter #3
I thought about composite, but it's very weak compared to real lumber. I use my trailer for anything and everything. Whatever goes back on needs to be as tough or tougher than what's there.

Do you know what kind of treated lumber? I'm assuming pressure treated pine? I'm not sure the newer pressure treated stuff won't attack the steel in the trailer. They advise you to use special fasteners at the lumber store due to the treatment used in the wood.
 

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Most of the time #2 Pressure Treated Pine is what is used.

You could talk to your local lumber yard and see if there is anything else that would work better / last longer.

Found this on PJ Trailers Website: Rubber Infused Wood

Blackwood Rubber Infused Lumber - PJ Trailers
 

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This is a million dollar question and one that has always plagued me.
:munch:
 

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Most of the time #2 Pressure Treated Pine is what is used.

You could talk to your local lumber yard and see if there is anything else that would work better / last longer.

Found this on PJ Trailers Website: Rubber Infused Wood

Blackwood Rubber Infused Lumber - PJ Trailers
That would be good the next time I have to replace the floor in the horse trailer, as well as for the flat bed. I'm sure it isn't cheap, but might make it the last time I needed to replace either.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Most of the time #2 Pressure Treated Pine is what is used.

You could talk to your local lumber yard and see if there is anything else that would work better / last longer.
Yeah, that's what I'm thinking, just wondering if there's something better. I don't want to do this every few years. I'm not a big fan of the pressure treated lumber around here. It seems to be junk and not last long.

Found this on PJ Trailers Website: Rubber Infused Wood

Blackwood Rubber Infused Lumber - PJ Trailers
That looks interesting. I wonder what the true longevity of that would be. Plus I seriously doubt they would sell just the lumber...
 

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Treated Southern Yellow Pine is pretty good stuff, bark side up.
 
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Yeah, that's what I'm thinking, just wondering if there's something better. I don't want to do this every few years. I'm not a big fan of the pressure treated lumber around here. It seems to be junk and not last long.



That looks interesting. I wonder what the true longevity of that would be. Plus I seriously doubt they would sell just the lumber...
Industrial Wood Technology
903-705-6982
PO Box 672 Winona, TX 75792


It is not a PJ Product.
 

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I've had good results with semi trailer flooring. I don't know the exact composition or what it's treated with, but it's held up very well in all the trailers we've used. It has a lip on the sides that slides under the board next to it so even if there is a little shrinkage you don't end up with a gap.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I've had good results with semi trailer flooring. I don't know the exact composition or what it's treated with, but it's held up very well in all the trailers we've used. It has a lip on the sides that slides under the board next to it so even if there is a little shrinkage you don't end up with a gap.
How would that do in an exposed to rain situation? Wouldn't the no gap be bad for drainage? And where can a guy get it?
 

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Just googled "semi truck trailer decking" and got some interesting results.
 

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I used untreated wood for my 12 foot trailer seven or eight years ago. Painted the boards with Thompsons paint AFTER assembly. This material and process was not good. It needs to be replaced again. My plan was to use pressure treated two bys and treat them prior to assembly. I have also thought about rough cut 5/4 if I can find it.

Now, I will watch this and see what diesel decides on. :munch:
 
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The bottom of trailer flooring is exposed all the time and subjected to water/ salt/ all the other junk on the roads and holds up fine. We ran it on our flatbed where it was exposed to weather and replaced it when it was about 12 years old. The boards were still solid, but had been patched here and there where they'd get gouged up loading and unloading equipment that wouldn't operate. Never saw any noticeable shrinkage, either. As for drainage, if the trailer is sitting in one place just jack the nose up a little higher so the water runs off toward the back of the trailer.

It's available at any semi trailer shop and some truck shops. Here locally I've used Trailer Sales of Tennessee for a long, long time. :good2:
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Just googled "semi truck trailer decking" and got some interesting results.
A good part of my responses here on GTT isn't just for my benefit, it's for others that may read this. I can Google stuff all day long, but people's experiences and opinions can't always be found with Google. I like to hear your opinion, not some other website I've never been to before. I respect a lot of the experience found here on GTT.

So a lot of times you see me asking where I can get stuff, it's to get good info here in the the thread that's relevant. Hope that makes sense.:good2:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The bottom of trailer flooring is exposed all the time and subjected to water/ salt/ all the other junk on the roads and holds up fine. We ran it on our flatbed where it was exposed to weather and replaced it when it was about 12 years old. The boards were still solid, but had been patched here and there where they'd get gouged up loading and unloading equipment that wouldn't operate. Never saw any noticeable shrinkage, either. As for drainage, if the trailer is sitting in one place just jack the nose up a little higher so the water runs off toward the back of the trailer.

It's available at any semi trailer shop and some truck shops. Here locally I've used Trailer Sales of Tennessee for a long, long time. :good2:
Any idea of the cost by chance?
 

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I've had good results with semi trailer flooring. I don't know the exact composition or what it's treated with, but it's held up very well in all the trailers we've used. It has a lip on the sides that slides under the board next to it so even if there is a little shrinkage you don't end up with a gap.

The lip 56 is refering to is apparently called "shiplap"

"In a shiplap profile has wooden siding rabbets so that when installed the edge of each board will overlap the next one to it, forming a flush joint. Shiplap is one of the most popular cuts used in Trailer Decking."
 

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Any idea of the cost by chance?
It's been about three years since I bought any, so I suspect prices may have changed. I remember we did a smaller flatbed truck that was 8' wide, and 25' long for about $400, but I don't remember how much of that was for the wood and how much was for new screws, drill bits, etc. You may also be able to find a better price at another shop, but the guys I mentioned before always treated me well and were helpful so I just went back there.
 

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A good part of my responses here on GTT isn't just for my benefit, it's for others that may read this. I can Google stuff all day long, but people's experiences and opinions can't always be found with Google. I like to hear your opinion, not some other website I've never been to before. I respect a lot of the experience found here on GTT.

So a lot of times you see me asking where I can get stuff, it's to get good info here in the the thread that's relevant. Hope that makes sense.:good2:
100% Agreed.

56 gave me a good idea (semi trialer decking) and I went looking.

Sometimes knowing the right "search keywords" is also good info. I have been digging around those results and am learning all kinds of neet stuff, some of which I have shared here.

I have seen but never used the rubber infused wood. It looks like a good product and in my opinion if PJ trailers uses it...it can't be all that bad. They build a very good product. Given that it is not that old of a product - no one can say what its longevity will be.
 
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